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Monoclonal Antibody Ihc-Leica® bond™ Programmed Cell Death

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: CD14 is a leucine-rich repeat-containing pattern recognition receptor with expression largely restricted to the monocyte/macrophage cell lineage (1). Research studies have shown that CD14 is a bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding glycoprotein, expressed as either a GPI-linked membrane protein or a soluble plasma protein (2). LPS induces an upregulation of GPI-linked CD14 expression, which facilitates TLR4 signaling and macrophage activation in response to bacterial infection (3-5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bim/Bod is a pro-apoptotic protein belonging to the BH3-only group of Bcl-2 family members including Bad, Bid, Bik, Hrk, and Noxa that contain a BH3 domain but lack other conserved BH1 or BH2 domains (1,2). Bim induces apoptosis by binding to and antagonizing anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family. Interactions have been observed with Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1, Bcl-w, Bfl-1, and BHRF-1 (1,2). Bim functions in regulating apoptosis associated with thymocyte negative selection and following growth factor withdrawal, during which Bim expression is elevated (3-6). Three major isoforms of Bim are generated by alternative splicing: BimEL, BimL, and BimS (1). The shortest form, BimS, is the most cytotoxic and is generally only transiently expressed during apoptosis. The BimEL and BimL isoforms may be sequestered to the dynein motor complex through an interaction with the dynein light chain and released from this complex during apoptosis (7). Apoptotic activity of these longer isoforms may be regulated by phosphorylation (8,9). Environmental stress triggers Bim phosphorylation by JNK and results in its dissociation from the dynein complex and increased apoptotic activity.

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: c-Kit is a member of the subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases that includes PDGF, CSF-1, and FLT3/flk-2 receptors (1,2). It plays a critical role in activation and growth in a number of cell types including hematopoietic stem cells, mast cells, melanocytes, and germ cells (3). Upon binding with its stem cell factor (SCF) ligand, c-Kit undergoes dimerization/oligomerization and autophosphorylation. Activation of c-Kit results in the recruitment and tyrosine phosphorylation of downstream SH2-containing signaling components including PLCγ, the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase, SHP2, and CrkL (4). Molecular lesions that impair the kinase activity of c-Kit are associated with a variety of developmental disorders (5), and mutations that constitutively activate c-Kit can lead to pathogenesis of mastocytosis and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (6). Tyr719 is located in the kinase insert region of the catalytic domain. c-Kit phosphorylated at Tyr719 binds to the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase in vitro and in vivo (7).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Granzymes are a family of serine proteases expressed by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells and are key components of immune responses to pathogens and transformed cells (1). Granzymes are synthesized as zymogens and are processed into mature enzymes by cleavage of a leader sequence. They are released by exocytosis in lysosome-like granules containing perforin, a membrane pore-forming protein. Granzyme B has the strongest apoptotic activity of all the granzymes as a result of its caspase-like ability to cleave substrates at aspartic acid residues thereby activating procaspases directly and cleaving downstream caspase substrates (2,3).