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Monoclonal Antibody Ihc-Leica® bond™ Protein Amino Acid Phosphorylation

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF, CSF-1) receptor is an integral membrane tyrosine kinase encoded by the c-fms proto-oncogene. M-CSF receptor is expressed in monocytes (macrophages and their progenitors) and drives growth and development of this blood cell lineage. (1-3). Binding of M-CSF to its receptor induces receptor dimerization, activation, and autophosphorylation of cytoplasmic tyrosine residues used as docking sites for SH2-containing signaling proteins (4). There are at least five major tyrosine autophosphorylation sites. Tyr723 (Tyr721 in mouse) is located in the kinase insert (KI) region. Phosphorylated Tyr723 binds the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase as well as PLCγ2 (5). Phosphorylation of Tyr809 provides a docking site for Shc (5). Overactivation of this receptor can lead to a malignant phenotype in various cell systems (6). The activated M-CSF receptor has been shown to be a predictor of poor outcome in advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma (7) and breast cancer (8).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Semaphorin-4D/CD100 (Sema4D) is a disulfide-linked homodimeric type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein belonging to the class IV family of membrane bound semaphorins. The extracellular domain of Sema4D contains a cysteine-rich semaphorin-like domain, an Ig-like domain, and a PSI domain (1). Research studies have suggested that the cytoplasmic domain has a signaling function as it is phosphorylated on serine residues (2). Initial studies involving Sema4D revealed that it was implicated in axon guidance within the central nervous system through binding its high affinity receptor, plexin-B1 (3). Sema4D function has also been extensively characterized in the immune system and is the first semaphorin found to be expressed on the surface of many types of immune cells (4-6). In the immune system, CD72 serves as a low-affinity receptor for Sema4D (7) and research studies have shown that Sema4D not only regulates T-cell activation (8,9) but is also involved in the regulation of B-cell survival and differentiation (10). Many of the physiologic effects of Sema4D in the immune system are regulated by a soluble extracellular domain-containing fragment generated through proteolytic cleavage (11).Sema4D has also been implicated in oncogenesis as research studies have demonstrated overexpression in multiple types of solid tumors (12,13). The role of Sema4D in oncogenesis, in part, has been linked to its ability to promote tumor angiogenesis (14), cell invasion (15), and immunosuppression through enhancement of myeloid derived suppressor cell function (16).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CD40, also known as tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 5 (TNFRSF5), is a type I transmembrane protein expressed on the surface of B cells and professional antigen-presenting cells of the immune system, as well as on several non-hematopoietic cell types and cancers (1-4). CD40 interacts with CD40 ligand (CD40L/TNFSF5), which is expressed primarily on activated T cells but has also been reported on blood platelets, mast cells, basophils, NK cells, and B cells (5). Upon engagement with CD40L, CD40 signals through TNF receptor associated factors and MAP kinase signaling pathways, resulting in a wide variety of immune and inflammatory responses, including dendritic cell activation and cross-presentation, T cell-dependent immunoglobulin class switching, memory B cell development, and germinal center formation (6-8). The CD40/CD40L axis is essential for the initiation and progression of cellular and humoral adaptive immunity, and is an important area of interest in the study of tumor immunology, neurodegenerative diseases, vascular diseases, and inflammatory disorders (9-12).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activity of the cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6 is regulated by T-loop phosphorylation, by the abundance of their cyclin partners (the D-type cyclins), and by association with CDK inhibitors of the Cip/Kip or INK family of proteins (1). The inactive ternary complex of cyclin D/CDK4 and p27 Kip1 requires extracellular mitogenic stimuli for the release and degradation of p27 concomitant with a rise in cyclin D levels to affect progression through the restriction point and Rb-dependent entry into S-phase (2). The active complex of cyclin D/CDK4 targets the retinoblastoma protein for phosphorylation, allowing the release of E2F transcription factors that activate G1/S-phase gene expression (3). Levels of cyclin D protein drop upon withdrawal of growth factors through downregulation of protein expression and phosphorylation-dependent degradation (4).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: CD40, also known as tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 5 (TNFRSF5), is a type I transmembrane protein expressed on the surface of B cells and professional antigen-presenting cells of the immune system, as well as on several non-hematopoietic cell types and cancers (1-4). CD40 interacts with CD40 ligand (CD40L/TNFSF5), which is expressed primarily on activated T cells but has also been reported on blood platelets, mast cells, basophils, NK cells, and B cells (5). Upon engagement with CD40L, CD40 signals through TNF receptor associated factors and MAP kinase signaling pathways, resulting in a wide variety of immune and inflammatory responses, including dendritic cell activation and cross-presentation, T cell-dependent immunoglobulin class switching, memory B cell development, and germinal center formation (6-8). The CD40/CD40L axis is essential for the initiation and progression of cellular and humoral adaptive immunity, and is an important area of interest in the study of tumor immunology, neurodegenerative diseases, vascular diseases, and inflammatory disorders (9-12).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a member of the Btk/Tec family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases. Like other Btk family members, it contains a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and Src homology SH3 and SH2 domains. Btk plays an important role in B cell development (1,2). Activation of B cells by various ligands is accompanied by Btk membrane translocation mediated by its PH domain binding to phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (3-5). The membrane-localized Btk is active and associated with transient phosphorylation of two tyrosine residues, Tyr551 and Tyr223. Tyr551 in the activation loop is transphosphorylated by the Src family tyrosine kinases, leading to autophosphorylation at Tyr223 within the SH3 domain, which is necessary for full activation (6,7). The activation of Btk is negatively regulated by PKCβ through phosphorylation of Btk at Ser180, which results in reduced membrane recruitment, transphosphorylation, and subsequent activation (8). The PKC inhibitory signal is likely to be a key determinant of the B cell receptor signaling threshold to maintain optimal Btk activity (8).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation

Background: The protein phosphatase (PTP) receptor CD45 is a type I transmembrane protein comprised of a pair of intracellular tyrosine phosphatase domains and a variable extracellular domain generated by alternative splicing (1). The catalytic activity of CD45 is a function of the first phosphatase domain (D1) while the second phosphatase domain (D2) may interact with and stabilize the first domain, or recruit/bind substrates (2,3). CD45 interacts directly with antigen receptor complex proteins or activates Src family kinases involved in the regulation of T- and B-cell antigen receptor signaling (1). Specifically, CD45 dephosphorylates Src-family kinases Lck and Fyn at their conserved negative regulatory carboxy-terminal tyrosine residues and upregulates kinase activity. Conversely, studies indicate that CD45 can also inhibit Lck and Fyn by dephosphorylating their positive regulatory autophosphorylation site. CD45 appears to be both a positive and a negative regulator that conducts signals depending on specific stimuli and cell type (1). Human leukocytes including lymphocytes, eosinophils, monocytes, basophils, and neutrophils express CD45, while erythrocytes and platelets are negative for CD45 expression (4).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Met, a high affinity tyrosine kinase receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, also known as scatter factor) is a disulfide-linked heterodimer made of 45 kDa α- and 145 kDa β-subunits (1,2). The α-subunit and the amino-terminal region of the β-subunit form the extracellular domain. The remainder of the β-chain spans the plasma membrane and contains a cytoplasmic region with tyrosine kinase activity. Interaction of Met with HGF results in autophosphorylation at multiple tyrosines, which recruit several downstream signaling components, including Gab1, c-Cbl, and PI3 kinase (3). These fundamental events are important for all of the biological functions involving Met kinase activity. The addition of a phosphate at cytoplasmic Tyr1003 is essential for Met protein ubiquitination and degradation (4). Phosphorylation at Tyr1234/1235 in the Met kinase domain is critical for kinase activation. Phosphorylation at Tyr1349 in the Met cytoplasmic domain provides a direct binding site for Gab1 (5). Research studies have shown that altered Met levels and/or tyrosine kinase activities are found in several types of tumors, including renal, colon, and breast. Thus, investigators have concluded that Met is an attractive potential cancer therapeutic and diagnostic target (6,7).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: c-Kit is a member of the subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases that includes PDGF, CSF-1, and FLT3/flk-2 receptors (1,2). It plays a critical role in activation and growth in a number of cell types including hematopoietic stem cells, mast cells, melanocytes, and germ cells (3). Upon binding with its stem cell factor (SCF) ligand, c-Kit undergoes dimerization/oligomerization and autophosphorylation. Activation of c-Kit results in the recruitment and tyrosine phosphorylation of downstream SH2-containing signaling components including PLCγ, the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase, SHP2, and CrkL (4). Molecular lesions that impair the kinase activity of c-Kit are associated with a variety of developmental disorders (5), and mutations that constitutively activate c-Kit can lead to pathogenesis of mastocytosis and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (6). Tyr719 is located in the kinase insert region of the catalytic domain. c-Kit phosphorylated at Tyr719 binds to the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase in vitro and in vivo (7).