Microsize antibodies for $99 | Learn More >>

Monoclonal Antibody Ihc-Leica® bond™ Regulation of Cell Cycle

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bim/Bod is a pro-apoptotic protein belonging to the BH3-only group of Bcl-2 family members including Bad, Bid, Bik, Hrk, and Noxa that contain a BH3 domain but lack other conserved BH1 or BH2 domains (1,2). Bim induces apoptosis by binding to and antagonizing anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family. Interactions have been observed with Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1, Bcl-w, Bfl-1, and BHRF-1 (1,2). Bim functions in regulating apoptosis associated with thymocyte negative selection and following growth factor withdrawal, during which Bim expression is elevated (3-6). Three major isoforms of Bim are generated by alternative splicing: BimEL, BimL, and BimS (1). The shortest form, BimS, is the most cytotoxic and is generally only transiently expressed during apoptosis. The BimEL and BimL isoforms may be sequestered to the dynein motor complex through an interaction with the dynein light chain and released from this complex during apoptosis (7). Apoptotic activity of these longer isoforms may be regulated by phosphorylation (8,9). Environmental stress triggers Bim phosphorylation by JNK and results in its dissociation from the dynein complex and increased apoptotic activity.

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation

Background: The protein phosphatase (PTP) receptor CD45 is a type I transmembrane protein comprised of a pair of intracellular tyrosine phosphatase domains and a variable extracellular domain generated by alternative splicing (1). The catalytic activity of CD45 is a function of the first phosphatase domain (D1) while the second phosphatase domain (D2) may interact with and stabilize the first domain, or recruit/bind substrates (2,3). CD45 interacts directly with antigen receptor complex proteins or activates Src family kinases involved in the regulation of T- and B-cell antigen receptor signaling (1). Specifically, CD45 dephosphorylates Src-family kinases Lck and Fyn at their conserved negative regulatory carboxy-terminal tyrosine residues and upregulates kinase activity. Conversely, studies indicate that CD45 can also inhibit Lck and Fyn by dephosphorylating their positive regulatory autophosphorylation site. CD45 appears to be both a positive and a negative regulator that conducts signals depending on specific stimuli and cell type (1). Human leukocytes including lymphocytes, eosinophils, monocytes, basophils, and neutrophils express CD45, while erythrocytes and platelets are negative for CD45 expression (4).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activity of the cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6 is regulated by T-loop phosphorylation, by the abundance of their cyclin partners (the D-type cyclins), and by association with CDK inhibitors of the Cip/Kip or INK family of proteins (1). The inactive ternary complex of cyclin D/CDK4 and p27 Kip1 requires extracellular mitogenic stimuli for the release and degradation of p27 concomitant with a rise in cyclin D levels to affect progression through the restriction point and Rb-dependent entry into S-phase (2). The active complex of cyclin D/CDK4 targets the retinoblastoma protein for phosphorylation, allowing the release of E2F transcription factors that activate G1/S-phase gene expression (3). Levels of cyclin D protein drop upon withdrawal of growth factors through downregulation of protein expression and phosphorylation-dependent degradation (4).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Human p14 ARF (p19 ARF in mouse) is a pro-apoptotic cell cycle regulator frequently inactive in human tumors (1). Basal expression of p14 ARF is low in most cell types, but accumulation of this protein occurs in response to oncogene expression (2,3). Increased p14 ARF levels facilitate MDM2 degradation, leading to increased p53 protein levels and subsequent cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis (4). While most p14 ARF signaling has traditionally thought to be p53-dependent, more recent reports have described p53-independent p14 ARF signaling leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: L-arginine plays a critical role in regulating the immune system (1-3). In inflammation, cancer and certain other pathological conditions, myeloid cell differentiation is inhibited leading to a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells, known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs are recruited to sites of cancer-associated inflammation and express high levels of arginase-1 (4). Arginase-1 catalyzes the final step of the urea cycle converting L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea (5). Thus MDSCs increase the catabolism of L-arginine resulting in L-arginine depletion in the inflammatory microenvironment of cancer (4,6). The reduced availability of L-arginine suppresses T-cell proliferation and function and thus contributes to tumor progression (4,6). Arginase-1 is of great interest to researchers looking for a therapeutic target to inhibit the function of MDSCs in the context of cancer immunotherapy (7). In addition, research studies have demonstrated that Arginase-1 distinguishes primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from metastatic tumors in the liver, indicating its value as a potential biomarker in the diagnosis of HCC (8,9).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: L-arginine plays a critical role in regulating the immune system (1-3). In inflammation, cancer and certain other pathological conditions, myeloid cell differentiation is inhibited leading to a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells, known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs are recruited to sites of cancer-associated inflammation and express high levels of arginase-1 (4). Arginase-1 catalyzes the final step of the urea cycle converting L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea (5). Thus MDSCs increase the catabolism of L-arginine resulting in L-arginine depletion in the inflammatory microenvironment of cancer (4,6). The reduced availability of L-arginine suppresses T-cell proliferation and function and thus contributes to tumor progression (4,6). Arginase-1 is of great interest to researchers looking for a therapeutic target to inhibit the function of MDSCs in the context of cancer immunotherapy (7). In addition, research studies have demonstrated that Arginase-1 distinguishes primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from metastatic tumors in the liver, indicating its value as a potential biomarker in the diagnosis of HCC (8,9).