Microsize antibodies for $99 | Learn More >>

Monoclonal Antibody Ihc-Leica Bond Regulation of Cell Differentiation

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: OX40 (TNFRSF4, CD134) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily that regulates T cell activity and immune responses. The OX40 protein contains four cysteine rich domains, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail containing a QEE motif (1,2). OX40 is primarily expressed on activated CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, while the OX40 ligand (OX40L, TNFSF4, CD252) is predominantly expressed on activated antigen presenting cells (3-7). The engagement of OX40 with OX40L leads to the recruitment of TNF receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) and results in the formation of a TCR-independent signaling complex. One component of this complex, PKCθ, activates the NF-κB pathway (2,8). OX40 signaling through Akt can also enhance TCR signaling directly (9). Research studies indicate that the OX40L-OX40 pathway is associated with inflammation and autoimmune diseases (10). Additional research studies show that OX40 agonists augment anti-tumor immunity in several cancer types (11,12).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Forkhead box (Fox) proteins are a family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors containing a sequence known as Forkhead box or winged helix DNA binding domain (1). The human genome contains 43 Fox proteins that are divided into subfamilies. The FoxP subfamily has four members, FoxP1 - FoxP4, which are broadly expressed and play important roles in organ development, immune response and cancer pathogenesis (2-4). The FoxP subfamily has several characteristics that are atypical among Fox proteins: their Forkhead domain is located at the carboxy-terminal region and they contain motifs that promote homo- and heterodimerization. FoxP proteins usually function as transcriptional repressors (4,5).FoxP3 is crucial for the development of T cells with regulatory properties (Treg) (6). Mutations in FoxP3 are associated with immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, and X-linked syndrome (IPEX) (7), while overexpression in mice causes severe immunodeficiency (8). Research studies have shown that FoxP3 functions as a tumor suppressor in several types of cancer (9-11).