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Monoclonal Antibody Immunofluorescence Frozen Calcium Ion Binding

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: F4/80 (EMR1) is a heavily glycosylated G-protein-coupled receptor and is a well-established marker for mouse macrophages (1-3). Expression of F4/80 has also been observed in microglia and subset populations of dendritic cells (4).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Calcium-binding proteins of different subfamilies regulate the second messenger calcium. Calbindin, calmodulin, S-100, parvalbumin and troponin C are members of the low molecular weight calcium-binding protein family (1). Calbindin is expressed in discrete neuronal populations within the CNS and is thought to act as an intracellular calcium buffering protein. Most Purkinje cells express calbindin, which is expressed when neurons start to migrate and differentiate. In contrast, other calcium buffering proteins, such as parvalbumin, are expressed later during development and in parallel with increasing neuronal activity (2).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: α-Synuclein is a protein of 140-amino acids expressed abundantly in the brain. α-Synuclein is also the main component of pathogenic Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. Research studies have shown that mutations of the α-synuclein gene are linked to Parkinson's disease (1).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: F4/80 (EMR1) is a heavily glycosylated G-protein-coupled receptor and is a well-established marker for mouse macrophages (1-3). Expression of F4/80 has also been observed in microglia and subset populations of dendritic cells (4).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Calcium-binding proteins of different subfamilies regulate the second messenger calcium. Calbindin, calmodulin, S-100, parvalbumin and troponin C are members of the low molecular weight calcium-binding protein family (1). Calbindin is expressed in discrete neuronal populations within the CNS and is thought to act as an intracellular calcium buffering protein. Most Purkinje cells express calbindin, which is expressed when neurons start to migrate and differentiate. In contrast, other calcium buffering proteins, such as parvalbumin, are expressed later during development and in parallel with increasing neuronal activity (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Synaptotagmin 1 (SYT1) is an integral membrane protein found in synaptic vesicles thought to play a role in vesicle trafficking and exocytosis (1). Individual SYT1 proteins are composed of an amino-terminal transmembrane region, a central linker region and a pair of carboxy-terminal C2 domains responsible for binding Ca2+ (2). The C2 domains appear to be functionally distinct, with the C2A domain responsible for regulating synaptic vesicle fusion in a calcium-dependent manner during exocytosis while the C2B domain allows for interaction between adjacent SYT1 proteins (3). Because synaptotagmin 1 binds calcium and is found in synaptic vesicles, this integral membrane protein is thought to act as a calcium sensor in fast synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Evidence suggests possible roles in vesicle-mediated endocytosis and glucose-induced insulin secretion as well (4,5). SYT1 binds several different SNARE proteins during calcium-mediated vesicle endocytosis and an association between SYT1 and the SNARE protein SNAP-25 is thought to be a key element in vesicle-mediated exocytosis (6).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: S100A8 and S100A9 are calcium-binding proteins that form a noncovalent heterodimer present in monocytes, neutrophils, macrophages, and some epithelial cells (1, 2). S100A8 and S100A9 are secreted by a tubulin-dependent mechanism during inflammatory conditions and have antimicrobial and chemotactic functions (3-5). Extracellular S100A8/S100A9 also induces an inflammatory response in endothelial cells, including induction of proinflammatory chemokines and adhesion molecules and increased vascular permeability (6). S100A8/S100A9 induces and recruits myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in tumor-bearing mice (7). MDSC produce additional S100A8/S100A9 themselves, resulting in a positive feedback mechanism that sustains MDSC accumulation (7). S100A8/S100A9 is also highly expressed in psoriatic skin, where it directly upregulates transcription of complement protein C3, which contributes to disease (8). In addition, tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells induce expression of S100A8 and S100A9 in cancer cells, which increases invasiveness and metastasis (9).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in rat cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Calbindin (D1I4Q) XP® Rabbit mAb #13176.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Calcium-binding proteins of different subfamilies regulate the second messenger calcium. Calbindin, calmodulin, S-100, parvalbumin and troponin C are members of the low molecular weight calcium-binding protein family (1). Calbindin is expressed in discrete neuronal populations within the CNS and is thought to act as an intracellular calcium buffering protein. Most Purkinje cells express calbindin, which is expressed when neurons start to migrate and differentiate. In contrast, other calcium buffering proteins, such as parvalbumin, are expressed later during development and in parallel with increasing neuronal activity (2).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 594 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in rat cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Calbindin (D1I4Q) XP® Rabbit mAb #13176.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Calcium-binding proteins of different subfamilies regulate the second messenger calcium. Calbindin, calmodulin, S-100, parvalbumin and troponin C are members of the low molecular weight calcium-binding protein family (1). Calbindin is expressed in discrete neuronal populations within the CNS and is thought to act as an intracellular calcium buffering protein. Most Purkinje cells express calbindin, which is expressed when neurons start to migrate and differentiate. In contrast, other calcium buffering proteins, such as parvalbumin, are expressed later during development and in parallel with increasing neuronal activity (2).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in rat cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Calbindin (D1I4Q) XP® Rabbit mAb #13176.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Calcium-binding proteins of different subfamilies regulate the second messenger calcium. Calbindin, calmodulin, S-100, parvalbumin and troponin C are members of the low molecular weight calcium-binding protein family (1). Calbindin is expressed in discrete neuronal populations within the CNS and is thought to act as an intracellular calcium buffering protein. Most Purkinje cells express calbindin, which is expressed when neurons start to migrate and differentiate. In contrast, other calcium buffering proteins, such as parvalbumin, are expressed later during development and in parallel with increasing neuronal activity (2).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: α-Synuclein is a protein of 140-amino acids expressed abundantly in the brain. α-Synuclein is also the main component of pathogenic Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. Research studies have shown that mutations of the α-synuclein gene are linked to Parkinson's disease (1).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: α-Synuclein is a protein of 140-amino acids expressed abundantly in the brain. α-Synuclein is also the main component of pathogenic Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. Research studies have shown that mutations of the α-synuclein gene are linked to Parkinson's disease (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are serine/threonine kinases that are activated by cyclins and govern eukaryotic cell cycle progression. While CDK5 shares high sequence homology with its family members, it is thought mainly to function in postmitotic neurons, regulating the cytoarchitecture of these cells. Analogous to cyclins, p35 and p39 associate with and activate CDK5 despite the lack of sequence homology. CDK5 is ubiquitously expressed, but high levels of kinase activity are detected primarily in the nervous system due to the narrow expression pattern of p35 and p39 in post-mitotic neurons. A large number of CDK5 substrates have been identified although no discrete substrates have been attributed as a function of p35 vs. p39. Amongst many, substrates of CDK5 include p35 and p39. p35 is rapidly degraded (T1/2 <20 min) by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (1). However, p35 stability increases as CDK5 kinase activity decreases, and this is likely a result of decreased phosphorylation of p35 at Thr138 by CDK5 (2). NGF activates Erk and EGR1, and induces p35 expression in PC12 cells (3). Proteolytic cleavage of p35 by calpain produces p25 upon neurotoxic insult, resulting in prolonged activation of CDK5 by p25. Accumulation of p25 is found in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (4-5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) forms a heterodimer of at least one NR1 and one NR2A-D subunit. Multiple receptor isoforms with distinct brain distributions and functional properties arise by selective splicing of the NR1 transcripts and differential expression of the NR2 subunits. NR1 subunits bind the co-agonist glycine and NR2 subunits bind the neurotransmitter glutamate. Activation of the NMDA receptor or opening of the ion channel allows flow of Na+ and Ca2+ ions into the cell, and K+ out of the cell (1). Each subunit has a cytoplasmic domain that can be directly modified by the protein kinase/phosphatase (2). PKC can phosphorylate the NR1 subunit (NMDAR1) of the receptor at Ser890/Ser896, and PKA can phosphorylate NR1 at Ser897 (3). The phosphorylation of NR1 by PKC decreases its affinity for calmodulin, thus preventing the inhibitory effect of calmodulin on NMDAR (4). The phosphorylation of NR1 by PKA probably counteracts the inhibitory effect of calcineurin on the receptor (5). NMDAR mediates long-term potentiation and slow postsynaptic excitation, which play central roles in learning, neurodevelopment, and neuroplasticity (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).