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Monoclonal Antibody Immunofluorescence Frozen Phospholipase c Activation

Also showing Monoclonal Antibody Immunofluorescence Frozen Phospholipase c Activating Pathway

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: CREB is a bZIP transcription factor that activates target genes through cAMP response elements. CREB is able to mediate signals from numerous physiological stimuli, resulting in regulation of a broad array of cellular responses. While CREB is expressed in numerous tissues, it plays a large regulatory role in the nervous system. CREB is believed to play a key role in promoting neuronal survival, precursor proliferation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal differentiation in certain neuronal populations (1-3). Additionally, CREB signaling is involved in learning and memory in several organisms (4-6). CREB is able to selectively activate numerous downstream genes through interactions with different dimerization partners. CREB is activated by phosphorylation at Ser133 by various signaling pathways including Erk, Ca2+, and stress signaling. Some of the kinases involved in phosphorylating CREB at Ser133 are p90RSK, MSK, CaMKIV, and MAPKAPK-2 (7-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Orexin, also called HCRT or hypocretin, is expressed as a precursor that is processed into two biologically active neuropeptides called orexin-A (HCRT1) and orexin-B (HCRT2) (1). Orexin is expressed in the lateral and posterior hypothalamus and plays a role in feeding behavior (1). The orexin neuropeptides act by stimulating the two orexin receptors that belong to the G Protein-Coupled Receptors family (1). Orexin receptor 1 is mostly found in the hypothalamic region, while orexin receptor 2 is also found in the cerebral cortex and the nucleus accumbent (2). Orexin also plays a role in adipocyte homeostasis and is required for brown adipose tissue development, differentiation, and function (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: CREB is a bZIP transcription factor that activates target genes through cAMP response elements. CREB is able to mediate signals from numerous physiological stimuli, resulting in regulation of a broad array of cellular responses. While CREB is expressed in numerous tissues, it plays a large regulatory role in the nervous system. CREB is believed to play a key role in promoting neuronal survival, precursor proliferation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal differentiation in certain neuronal populations (1-3). Additionally, CREB signaling is involved in learning and memory in several organisms (4-6). CREB is able to selectively activate numerous downstream genes through interactions with different dimerization partners. CREB is activated by phosphorylation at Ser133 by various signaling pathways including Erk, Ca2+, and stress signaling. Some of the kinases involved in phosphorylating CREB at Ser133 are p90RSK, MSK, CaMKIV, and MAPKAPK-2 (7-9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a peptide of 37 amino acids that belongs to the calcitonin (CT) family of peptide hormones. The calcitonin gene (CALCA) encodes a number of tissue-specific peptides through alternative splicing of mRNA transcripts and precursor protein cleavage (1). Both calcitonin and α-CGRP are produced from the CALCA gene, while a second gene (CALCB) encodes the related β-CGRP protein (2). α-CGRP and β-CGRP share similar activities and differ by three or fewer residues depending on the species (3). The CGRP peptide activates a heterotrimeric receptor complex that consists of the seven transmembrane-spanning calcitonin receptor-like receptor, the single transmembrane-spanning RAMP1 protein, and an intracellular receptor component protein (4,5). CGRP is expressed in the central and peripheral nervous system in mammals, where it exhibits several important physiologic roles. Research studies demonstrate that CGRP is a potent vasodilatator (6) and a modulator of acetylcholine receptor function at neuromuscular junctions (7). Additional studies indicate that CGRP peptide is involved in feeding (8) and inflammatory pain (9). CGRP peptide also plays a key role in the physiology of migraine attacks. Specifically, CGRP peptide levels increase during acute migraine attacks, which can be ameliorated through treatment with CGRP antagonists (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CREB is a bZIP transcription factor that activates target genes through cAMP response elements. CREB is able to mediate signals from numerous physiological stimuli, resulting in regulation of a broad array of cellular responses. While CREB is expressed in numerous tissues, it plays a large regulatory role in the nervous system. CREB is believed to play a key role in promoting neuronal survival, precursor proliferation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal differentiation in certain neuronal populations (1-3). Additionally, CREB signaling is involved in learning and memory in several organisms (4-6). CREB is able to selectively activate numerous downstream genes through interactions with different dimerization partners. CREB is activated by phosphorylation at Ser133 by various signaling pathways including Erk, Ca2+, and stress signaling. Some of the kinases involved in phosphorylating CREB at Ser133 are p90RSK, MSK, CaMKIV, and MAPKAPK-2 (7-9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
$630
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CREB is a bZIP transcription factor that activates target genes through cAMP response elements. CREB is able to mediate signals from numerous physiological stimuli, resulting in regulation of a broad array of cellular responses. While CREB is expressed in numerous tissues, it plays a large regulatory role in the nervous system. CREB is believed to play a key role in promoting neuronal survival, precursor proliferation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal differentiation in certain neuronal populations (1-3). Additionally, CREB signaling is involved in learning and memory in several organisms (4-6). CREB is able to selectively activate numerous downstream genes through interactions with different dimerization partners. CREB is activated by phosphorylation at Ser133 by various signaling pathways including Erk, Ca2+, and stress signaling. Some of the kinases involved in phosphorylating CREB at Ser133 are p90RSK, MSK, CaMKIV, and MAPKAPK-2 (7-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for the neurotransmitter glutamate in the mammalian brain. Unlike ionotropic receptors, metabotropic receptors do not form an ion channel pore themselves but are indirectly linked to ion channels (1). Both mGluR1 and mGluR5 are coupled to phospholipase C and activate inositol phospholipid metabolism via G protein-mediated mechanisms. Upon phosphatidylinositol activation, the second messenger calcium is released and generates a calcium-activated chloride current. Metabotropic glutamate receptors other than mGluR1 and mGluR5 inhibit adenylate cyclase (1-3). mGluR1 does not share sequence homology with conventional GPCRs (1). mGluR1 forms a homodimer and is linked to synaptic plasticity, as well as long-term potentiation and long-term depression. Furthermore, mGluR1 is a potential therapeutic target for various psychiatric and neurological diseases, including schizophrenia, epilepsy, and Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases (4-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: mGluR5, a metabotropic glutamate receptor, is a class C G protein-coupled receptor that signals through the Gaq/11-PLC-inositol 1,4,5 triphosphate pathway (1). mGluR5 is comprised of a large N-terminal extracellular domain, seven transmembrane domains, and a C-terminal intracellular domain. Glutamate binding to mGluR5 leads to an increase in intracellular calcium levels and stimulation of PKC activity (2). In neurons, mGluR5 is found in the post-synapse, in a complex with NMDA receptors, PSD-95, SHANK, and Homer (3). mGluR5 is also expressed in microglia and astrocytes (4). Neuronal mGluR5 has been shown to interact with amyloid beta oligomers, and mGluR5 antagonists exhibit neuroprotective effects (5) placing mGluR5 as a potential therapeutic target for Alzheimer’s disease. In glial cells, mGluR5 appears to play an anti-inflammatory role by negatively regulating the release of inflammatory factors (6).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells and immunofluorescence analysis in human cells and rat tissue. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-CREB (Ser133) (87G3) Rabbit mAb #9198.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: CREB is a bZIP transcription factor that activates target genes through cAMP response elements. CREB is able to mediate signals from numerous physiological stimuli, resulting in regulation of a broad array of cellular responses. While CREB is expressed in numerous tissues, it plays a large regulatory role in the nervous system. CREB is believed to play a key role in promoting neuronal survival, precursor proliferation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal differentiation in certain neuronal populations (1-3). Additionally, CREB signaling is involved in learning and memory in several organisms (4-6). CREB is able to selectively activate numerous downstream genes through interactions with different dimerization partners. CREB is activated by phosphorylation at Ser133 by various signaling pathways including Erk, Ca2+, and stress signaling. Some of the kinases involved in phosphorylating CREB at Ser133 are p90RSK, MSK, CaMKIV, and MAPKAPK-2 (7-9).