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Monoclonal Antibody Immunofluorescence Frozen Regulation of Synaptic Transmission

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Synaptotagmin 1 (SYT1) is an integral membrane protein found in synaptic vesicles thought to play a role in vesicle trafficking and exocytosis (1). Individual SYT1 proteins are composed of an amino-terminal transmembrane region, a central linker region and a pair of carboxy-terminal C2 domains responsible for binding Ca2+ (2). The C2 domains appear to be functionally distinct, with the C2A domain responsible for regulating synaptic vesicle fusion in a calcium-dependent manner during exocytosis while the C2B domain allows for interaction between adjacent SYT1 proteins (3). Because synaptotagmin 1 binds calcium and is found in synaptic vesicles, this integral membrane protein is thought to act as a calcium sensor in fast synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Evidence suggests possible roles in vesicle-mediated endocytosis and glucose-induced insulin secretion as well (4,5). SYT1 binds several different SNARE proteins during calcium-mediated vesicle endocytosis and an association between SYT1 and the SNARE protein SNAP-25 is thought to be a key element in vesicle-mediated exocytosis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Postsynaptic Density protein 95 (PSD95) is a member of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family of proteins. These family members consist of an amino-terminal variable segment followed by three PDZ domains, a SH3 domain, and an inactive guanylate kinase (GK) domain. PSD95 is a scaffolding protein involved in the assembly and function of the postsynaptic density complex (1-2). PSD95 participates in synaptic targeting of AMPA receptors through an indirect manner involving Stargazin and related transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) (3). It is implicated in experience-dependent plasticity and plays an indispensable role in learning (4). Mutations in PSD95 are associated with autism (5).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Western Blotting

Background: Postsynaptic Density protein 95 (PSD95) is a member of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family of proteins. These family members consist of an amino-terminal variable segment followed by three PDZ domains, a SH3 domain, and an inactive guanylate kinase (GK) domain. PSD95 is a scaffolding protein involved in the assembly and function of the postsynaptic density complex (1-2). PSD95 participates in synaptic targeting of AMPA receptors through an indirect manner involving Stargazin and related transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) (3). It is implicated in experience-dependent plasticity and plays an indispensable role in learning (4). Mutations in PSD95 are associated with autism (5).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Adenosine Receptor A2a (A2AR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). As a member of the purinergic adenosine receptors (A1, A2, and A3), A2AR activates classic G-protein signaling pathways upon binding of adenosine (1). Adenosine is present in all cells and extracellular fluids. Adenosine signaling, via A2AR, is mobilized during both physiological and pathological conditions. For example, adenosine, via A2AR, modulates neuronal function, acting to fine-tune neuronal function (2). A2AR function is modulated, in part, by its ability to form functional heteromers with other GPCRs, including dopamine receptors (D1 and D3), metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR5), and others (3). In the brain, A2AR is enriched in the basal ganglia, suggesting that A2AR may be a potential drug target for neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s disease, drug addiction, and psychiatric disorders (4). Outside of the brain, A2AR may act as an immune checkpoint molecule to maintain an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, an environment that exhibits relatively elevated adenosine levels (5, 6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: α-Synuclein is a protein of 140-amino acids expressed abundantly in the brain. α-Synuclein is also the main component of pathogenic Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. Research studies have shown that mutations of the α-synuclein gene are linked to Parkinson's disease (1).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. During neurotransmission, glutamate is released from vesicles of the pre-synaptic cell, and glutamate receptors (e.g. NMDA Receptor, AMPA Receptor) bind glutamate for activation at the opposing post-synaptic cell. Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) regulate and maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below excitotoxic levels. In addition, glutamate transporters may limit the duration of synaptic excitation by an electrogenic process in which the transmitter is cotransported with three sodium ions and one proton, followed by countertransport of a potassium ion. Five EAATs (EAAT1-5) are characterized: EAAT2 (GLT-1) is primarily expressed in astrocytes but is also expressed in neurons of the retina and during fetal development (1). Homozygous EAAT2 knockout mice have spontaneous, lethal seizures and an increased predisposition to acute cortical injury (2). PKC phosphorylates Ser113 of EAAT2 and coincides with glutamate transport (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for the neurotransmitter glutamate in the mammalian brain. Unlike ionotropic receptors, metabotropic receptors do not form an ion channel pore themselves but are indirectly linked to ion channels (1). Both mGluR1 and mGluR5 are coupled to phospholipase C and activate inositol phospholipid metabolism via G protein-mediated mechanisms. Upon phosphatidylinositol activation, the second messenger calcium is released and generates a calcium-activated chloride current. Metabotropic glutamate receptors other than mGluR1 and mGluR5 inhibit adenylate cyclase (1-3). mGluR1 does not share sequence homology with conventional GPCRs (1). mGluR1 forms a homodimer and is linked to synaptic plasticity, as well as long-term potentiation and long-term depression. Furthermore, mGluR1 is a potential therapeutic target for various psychiatric and neurological diseases, including schizophrenia, epilepsy, and Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases (4-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: mGluR5, a metabotropic glutamate receptor, is a class C G protein-coupled receptor that signals through the Gaq/11-PLC-inositol 1,4,5 triphosphate pathway (1). mGluR5 is comprised of a large N-terminal extracellular domain, seven transmembrane domains, and a C-terminal intracellular domain. Glutamate binding to mGluR5 leads to an increase in intracellular calcium levels and stimulation of PKC activity (2). In neurons, mGluR5 is found in the post-synapse, in a complex with NMDA receptors, PSD-95, SHANK, and Homer (3). mGluR5 is also expressed in microglia and astrocytes (4). Neuronal mGluR5 has been shown to interact with amyloid beta oligomers, and mGluR5 antagonists exhibit neuroprotective effects (5) placing mGluR5 as a potential therapeutic target for Alzheimer’s disease. In glial cells, mGluR5 appears to play an anti-inflammatory role by negatively regulating the release of inflammatory factors (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGluR2) is a class C G protein-coupled receptor for the neurotransmitter glutamate in the mammalian brain. Unlike ionotropic receptors, metabotropic receptors do not form an ion channel pore themselves but are indirectly linked to ion channels (1). While mGluR1 and mGluR5 activate phospholipase C, mGluR2, mGluR3, mGluR4, and mGluR6 are coupled to the inhibitory G protein Gα(i/o) and inhibit adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity (1). Research studies have suggested that mGluR2/3 receptors may be potential targets for the treatment of Schizophrenia (2). Furthermore, mGluR2 interacts with the 5HT2A serotonin receptor to form a hetero-complex in the brain. This complex is a potential pharmacological target for hallucinogenic drugs (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The endocannabinoid system consists of the cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2 receptors, the enzymes that produce and degrade the endogenous cannabinoid ligands (such as FAAH, DAG lipases, and MAG lipase), and the endocannabinoid ligands derived from the metabolism of arachidonic acid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and anandamide (1-3). CB1 receptor belongs to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and harbors a large N-terminal extracellular domain, seven transmembrane domains, and a C-terminal intracellular tail. CB1 receptor is coupled to the Gai/o subunit of the G protein which inhibits adenylyl cyclases and regulates calcium and potassium ion channels (4). CB1 receptor is one of the most abundant GPCRs in the central nervous system. It has been show to play critical roles in the wiring of the brain during development (5), in neuronal plasticity (6), analgesia, drug abuse and metabolic homeostasis (7). In addition, CB1 receptor has been shown to interact with other GPCRs, to give rise to novel pharmacological and signaling heteromers with implication in diseases (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The SHANK family proteins, also known as proline-rich synapse-associated proteins, consist of SHANK1, SHANK2, and SHANK3. SHANK proteins act as scaffolds at the neuronal post-synaptic density (PSD) (1), where they play a critical role in PSD assembly of excitatory synapses during development (2). While recruitment of SHANK proteins to the synapse is independent of their interaction with Homer (3), proper synaptic targeting of SHANK1 is mediated by interactions between its PDZ domain and PSD proteins (4). At the synapse, SHANK proteins interact with NMDA receptors and metabotropic glutamate receptor complexes (5). Research studies have proposed the involvement of SHANK proteins in autism and neurodegenerative diseases (6).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase that belongs to the HER/ErbB protein family. Ligand binding results in receptor dimerization, autophosphorylation, activation of downstream signaling, internalization, and lysosomal degradation (1,2). Phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) at Tyr845 in the kinase domain is implicated in stabilizing the activation loop, maintaining the active state enzyme, and providing a binding surface for substrate proteins (3,4). c-Src is involved in phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr845 (5). The SH2 domain of PLCγ binds at phospho-Tyr992, resulting in activation of PLCγ-mediated downstream signaling (6). Phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1045 creates a major docking site for the adaptor protein c-Cbl, leading to receptor ubiquitination and degradation following EGFR activation (7,8). The GRB2 adaptor protein binds activated EGFR at phospho-Tyr1068 (9). A pair of phosphorylated EGFR residues (Tyr1148 and Tyr1173) provide a docking site for the Shc scaffold protein, with both sites involved in MAP kinase signaling activation (2). Phosphorylation of EGFR at specific serine and threonine residues attenuates EGFR kinase activity. EGFR carboxy-terminal residues Ser1046 and Ser1047 are phosphorylated by CaM kinase II; mutation of either of these serines results in upregulated EGFR tyrosine autophosphorylation (10).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Synapsins, a group of at least five related members (synapsins Ia, Ib, IIa, IIb, and IIIa), are abundant brain proteins essential for regulating neurotransmitter release (1,2). All synapsins contain a short amino-terminal domain that is highly conserved and phosphorylated by PKA or CaM kinase I (1). Phosphorylation of the synapsin amino-terminal domain at Ser9 inhibits its binding to phospholipids and dissociates synapsins from synaptic vesicles (2).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in mouse and rat tissues. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Synapsin-1 (D12G5) XP® Rabbit mAb #5297.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Synapsins, a group of at least five related members (synapsins Ia, Ib, IIa, IIb, and IIIa), are abundant brain proteins essential for regulating neurotransmitter release (1,2). All synapsins contain a short amino-terminal domain that is highly conserved and phosphorylated by PKA or CaM kinase I (1). Phosphorylation of the synapsin amino-terminal domain at Ser9 inhibits its binding to phospholipids and dissociates synapsins from synaptic vesicles (2).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross reactivity as the unconjugated Synapsin-1 (D12G5) XP® Rabbit mAb #5297
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Synapsins, a group of at least five related members (synapsins Ia, Ib, IIa, IIb, and IIIa), are abundant brain proteins essential for regulating neurotransmitter release (1,2). All synapsins contain a short amino-terminal domain that is highly conserved and phosphorylated by PKA or CaM kinase I (1). Phosphorylation of the synapsin amino-terminal domain at Ser9 inhibits its binding to phospholipids and dissociates synapsins from synaptic vesicles (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2, also called synaptobrevin) is part of the R-soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex (1). The SNARE complex is involved in vesicular transport and membrane fusion, a process regulated by calcium (2). In neurons, VAMP2 is predominantly inserted in presynaptic vesicle membranes. Assembly of VAMP2 with the plasma membrane SNAREs syntaxin 1 and SNAP25 is a key event necessary for membrane fusion and neurotransmitter release (2). In addition to this important function, VAMP2 is also involved in granule exocytosis in neutrophils (3) and release of bioactive peptides from cardiac myocytes (4) and juxtaglomerular cells (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Chloride channel 3 (CLCN3) is a voltage-gated chloride channel (CIC) family protein that mediates H+/Cl- exchange across cell membranes. This 818 amino acid, multi-pass membrane protein is highly expressed in the brain and is especially abundant in the olfactory bulb, hippocampus, and cerebellum (1). CLCN3 protein localizes to endosomal compartments and synaptic vesicles where it contributes to vesicle acidification and proper synaptic vesicle neurotransmitter loading for GABAergic synaptic transmission (2,3). CAMKII-mediated phosphorylation of CLCN3 regulates chloride channel activity by regulating cell surface targeting of the CLCN3 chloride channel (4). Research studies show abnormally high CLCN3 expression at the cell surface of human glioma cells, and that CAMKII-dependent regulation of these channels contributes to glioma invasion (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter dopamine and other catecholamines. TH functions as a tetramer, with each subunit composed of a regulatory and catalytic domain, and exists in several different isoforms (1,2). This enzyme is required for embryonic development since TH knockout mice die before or at birth (3). Levels of transcription, translation and posttranslational modification regulate TH activity. The amino-terminal regulatory domain contains three serine residues: Ser9, Ser31 and Ser40. Phosphorylation at Ser40 by PKA positively regulates the catalytic activity of TH (4-6). Phosphorylation at Ser31 by CDK5 also increases the catalytic activity of TH through stabilization of TH protein levels (7-9).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: β-Catenin is a key downstream effector in the Wnt signaling pathway (1). It is implicated in two major biological processes in vertebrates: early embryonic development (2) and tumorigenesis (3). CK1 phosphorylates β-catenin at Ser45. This phosphorylation event primes β-catenin for subsequent phosphorylation by GSK-3β (4-6). GSK-3β destabilizes β-catenin by phosphorylating it at Ser33, Ser37, and Thr41 (7). Mutations at these sites result in the stabilization of β-catenin protein levels and have been found in many tumor cell lines (8).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: CREB is a bZIP transcription factor that activates target genes through cAMP response elements. CREB is able to mediate signals from numerous physiological stimuli, resulting in regulation of a broad array of cellular responses. While CREB is expressed in numerous tissues, it plays a large regulatory role in the nervous system. CREB is believed to play a key role in promoting neuronal survival, precursor proliferation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal differentiation in certain neuronal populations (1-3). Additionally, CREB signaling is involved in learning and memory in several organisms (4-6). CREB is able to selectively activate numerous downstream genes through interactions with different dimerization partners. CREB is activated by phosphorylation at Ser133 by various signaling pathways including Erk, Ca2+, and stress signaling. Some of the kinases involved in phosphorylating CREB at Ser133 are p90RSK, MSK, CaMKIV, and MAPKAPK-2 (7-9).