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Monoclonal Antibody Immunofluorescence Immunocytochemistry Autophagy

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1, p62) is a ubiquitin binding protein involved in cell signaling, oxidative stress, and autophagy (1-4). It was first identified as a protein that binds to the SH2 domain of p56Lck (5) and independently found to interact with PKCζ (6,7). SQSTM1 was subsequently found to interact with ubiquitin, providing a scaffold for several signaling proteins and triggering degradation of proteins through the proteasome or lysosome (8). Interaction between SQSTM1 and TRAF6 leads to the K63-linked polyubiquitination of TRAF6 and subsequent activation of the NF-κB pathway (9). Protein aggregates formed by SQSTM1 can be degraded by the autophagosome (4,10,11). SQSTM1 binds autophagosomal membrane protein LC3/Atg8, bringing SQSTM1-containing protein aggregates to the autophagosome (12). Lysosomal degradation of autophagosomes leads to a decrease in SQSTM1 levels during autophagy; conversely, autophagy inhibitors stabilize SQSTM1 levels. Studies have demonstrated a link between SQSTM1 and oxidative stress. SQSTM1 interacts with KEAP1, which is a cytoplasmic inhibitor of NRF2, a key transcription factor involved in cellular responses to oxidative stress (3). Thus, accumulation of SQSTM1 can lead to an increase in NRF2 activity.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation

Background: Sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1, p62) is a ubiquitin binding protein involved in cell signaling, oxidative stress, and autophagy (1-4). It was first identified as a protein that binds to the SH2 domain of p56Lck (5) and independently found to interact with PKCζ (6,7). SQSTM1 was subsequently found to interact with ubiquitin, providing a scaffold for several signaling proteins and triggering degradation of proteins through the proteasome or lysosome (8). Interaction between SQSTM1 and TRAF6 leads to the K63-linked polyubiquitination of TRAF6 and subsequent activation of the NF-κB pathway (9). Protein aggregates formed by SQSTM1 can be degraded by the autophagosome (4,10,11). SQSTM1 binds autophagosomal membrane protein LC3/Atg8, bringing SQSTM1-containing protein aggregates to the autophagosome (12). Lysosomal degradation of autophagosomes leads to a decrease in SQSTM1 levels during autophagy; conversely, autophagy inhibitors stabilize SQSTM1 levels. Studies have demonstrated a link between SQSTM1 and oxidative stress. SQSTM1 interacts with KEAP1, which is a cytoplasmic inhibitor of NRF2, a key transcription factor involved in cellular responses to oxidative stress (3). Thus, accumulation of SQSTM1 can lead to an increase in NRF2 activity.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1, p62) is a ubiquitin binding protein involved in cell signaling, oxidative stress, and autophagy (1-4). It was first identified as a protein that binds to the SH2 domain of p56Lck (5) and independently found to interact with PKCζ (6,7). SQSTM1 was subsequently found to interact with ubiquitin, providing a scaffold for several signaling proteins and triggering degradation of proteins through the proteasome or lysosome (8). Interaction between SQSTM1 and TRAF6 leads to the K63-linked polyubiquitination of TRAF6 and subsequent activation of the NF-κB pathway (9). Protein aggregates formed by SQSTM1 can be degraded by the autophagosome (4,10,11). SQSTM1 binds autophagosomal membrane protein LC3/Atg8, bringing SQSTM1-containing protein aggregates to the autophagosome (12). Lysosomal degradation of autophagosomes leads to a decrease in SQSTM1 levels during autophagy; conversely, autophagy inhibitors stabilize SQSTM1 levels. Studies have demonstrated a link between SQSTM1 and oxidative stress. SQSTM1 interacts with KEAP1, which is a cytoplasmic inhibitor of NRF2, a key transcription factor involved in cellular responses to oxidative stress (3). Thus, accumulation of SQSTM1 can lead to an increase in NRF2 activity.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1, p62) is a ubiquitin binding protein involved in cell signaling, oxidative stress, and autophagy (1-4). It was first identified as a protein that binds to the SH2 domain of p56Lck (5) and independently found to interact with PKCζ (6,7). SQSTM1 was subsequently found to interact with ubiquitin, providing a scaffold for several signaling proteins and triggering degradation of proteins through the proteasome or lysosome (8). Interaction between SQSTM1 and TRAF6 leads to the K63-linked polyubiquitination of TRAF6 and subsequent activation of the NF-κB pathway (9). Protein aggregates formed by SQSTM1 can be degraded by the autophagosome (4,10,11). SQSTM1 binds autophagosomal membrane protein LC3/Atg8, bringing SQSTM1-containing protein aggregates to the autophagosome (12). Lysosomal degradation of autophagosomes leads to a decrease in SQSTM1 levels during autophagy; conversely, autophagy inhibitors stabilize SQSTM1 levels. Studies have demonstrated a link between SQSTM1 and oxidative stress. SQSTM1 interacts with KEAP1, which is a cytoplasmic inhibitor of NRF2, a key transcription factor involved in cellular responses to oxidative stress (3). Thus, accumulation of SQSTM1 can lead to an increase in NRF2 activity.

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Cathepsin B (D1C7Y) XP® Rabbit mAb #31718.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Cathepsin B (CSTB), part of the papain family of proteases, is a widely expressed lysosomal cysteine endopeptidase (1,2). Cathepsin B is produced from a larger precursor form, pro-cathepsin B, which runs at approximately 44 kDa on SDS-PAGE, and is proteolytically processed and glycosylated to form a mature two-chain protein containing a heavy chain (running at 27 and 24 kDa) and a light chain (5 kDa). High levels of cathepsin B are found in macrophages and osteoclasts, as well as various types of cancer cells, including lung, colon, prostate, breast, and stomach. In addition, expression of cathepsin B has been associated with multiple sclerosis (3), rheumatoid arthritis (4), and pancreatitis (5). While generally localized to lysosomes, in cancer alterations can lead to its secretion (6). Its role in tumor progression is thought to involve promotion of basement membrane degradation, invasion and metastasis (7,8). Expression can correlate with poor prognosis for a variety of forms of cancer (9-13).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Bcl-2 exerts a survival function in response to a wide range of apoptotic stimuli through inhibition of mitochondrial cytochrome c release (1). It has been implicated in modulating mitochondrial calcium homeostasis and proton flux (2). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified within Bcl-2 including Thr56, Ser70, Thr74, and Ser87 (3). It has been suggested that these phosphorylation sites may be targets of the ASK1/MKK7/JNK1 pathway and that phosphorylation of Bcl-2 may be a marker for mitotic events (4,5). Mutation of Bcl-2 at Thr56 or Ser87 inhibits its anti-apoptotic activity during glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis of T lymphocytes (6). Interleukin-3 and JNK-induced Bcl-2 phosphorylation at Ser70 may be required for its enhanced anti-apoptotic functions (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitinating enzymes (UBEs) catalyze protein ubiquitination, a reversible process countered by deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) action (1,2). Five DUB subfamilies are recognized, including the USP, UCH, OTU, MJD, and JAMM enzymes. USP10 possesses amino acid sequences that match the consensus cysteine and histidine boxes representative of the USP family of deubiquitinating enzymes. At the posttranslational level, USP10 appears to be regulated through both protein-protein interactions and phosphorylation. Indeed, interaction of USP10 with Ras-GAP SH3 domain binding protein (G3BP) has been found to inhibit its ability to catalyze the disassembly of ubiquitin chains (3). Furthermore, ATM-mediated phosphorylation of USP10 at Thr42 and Ser337 was shown to promote USP10 stabilization and redistribution from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, where it functions in p53 deubiquitination, stabilization, and activation in response to genotoxic stress (4). Recently, it was shown that USP10 works in concert with USP13 and Vps34 complexes. USP10, along with USP13, appears to deubiquitinate Vps34 complexes to regulate the levels of this class III PI3K. Beclin-1, another component of these complexes, functions to regulate the stability of USP13, which can deubiquitinate and stabilize the levels of USP10. Therefore, Beclin-1, can indirectly regulate p53 stability by controlling the DUB activity of USP10 (5). USP10 also functions in the endosomal compartment, where it has been shown to deubiquitinate CFTR in order to enhance its endocytic recycling and cell surface expression (6,7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Two related serine/threonine kinases, UNC-51-like kinase 1 and 2 (ULK1, ULK2), were discovered as mammalian homologs of the C. elegans gene UNC-51 in which mutants exhibited abnormal axonal extension and growth (1-4). Both proteins are widely expressed and contain an amino-terminal kinase domain followed by a central proline/serine rich domain and a highly conserved carboxy-terminal domain. The roles of ULK1 and ULK2 in axon growth have been linked to studies showing that the kinases are localized to neuronal growth cones and are involved in endocytosis of critical growth factors, such as NGF (5). Yeast two-hybrid studies found ULK1/2 associated with modulators of the endocytic pathway, SynGAP and syntenin (6). Structural similarity of ULK1/2 has also been recognized with the yeast autophagy protein Atg1/Apg1 (7). Knockdown experiments using siRNA demonstrated that ULK1 is essential for autophagy (8), a catabolic process for the degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (9,10). It appears that Atg1/ULK1 can act as a convergence point for multiple signals that control autophagy (11), and can bind to several autophagy-related (Atg) proteins, regulating phosphorylation states and protein trafficking (12-16).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Forkhead family of transcription factors is involved in tumorigenesis of rhabdomyosarcoma and acute leukemias (1-3). Within the family, three members (FoxO1, FoxO4, and FoxO3a) have sequence similarity to the nematode orthologue DAF-16, which mediates signaling via a pathway involving IGFR1, PI3K, and Akt (4-6). Active forkhead members act as tumor suppressors by promoting cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Increased expression of any FoxO member results in the activation of the cell cycle inhibitor p27 Kip1. Forkhead transcription factors also play a part in TGF-β-mediated upregulation of p21 Cip1, a process negatively regulated through PI3K (7). Increased proliferation results when forkhead transcription factors are inactivated through phosphorylation by Akt at Thr24, Ser256, and Ser319, which results in nuclear export and inhibition of transcription factor activity (8). Forkhead transcription factors can also be inhibited by the deacetylase sirtuin (SirT1) (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1, p62) is a ubiquitin binding protein involved in cell signaling, oxidative stress, and autophagy (1-4). It was first identified as a protein that binds to the SH2 domain of p56Lck (5) and independently found to interact with PKCζ (6,7). SQSTM1 was subsequently found to interact with ubiquitin, providing a scaffold for several signaling proteins and triggering degradation of proteins through the proteasome or lysosome (8). Interaction between SQSTM1 and TRAF6 leads to the K63-linked polyubiquitination of TRAF6 and subsequent activation of the NF-κB pathway (9). Protein aggregates formed by SQSTM1 can be degraded by the autophagosome (4,10,11). SQSTM1 binds autophagosomal membrane protein LC3/Atg8, bringing SQSTM1-containing protein aggregates to the autophagosome (12). Lysosomal degradation of autophagosomes leads to a decrease in SQSTM1 levels during autophagy; conversely, autophagy inhibitors stabilize SQSTM1 levels. Studies have demonstrated a link between SQSTM1 and oxidative stress. SQSTM1 interacts with KEAP1, which is a cytoplasmic inhibitor of NRF2, a key transcription factor involved in cellular responses to oxidative stress (3). Thus, accumulation of SQSTM1 can lead to an increase in NRF2 activity.

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Cathepsin B (CSTB), part of the papain family of proteases, is a widely expressed lysosomal cysteine endopeptidase (1,2). Cathepsin B is produced from a larger precursor form, pro-cathepsin B, which runs at approximately 44 kDa on SDS-PAGE, and is proteolytically processed and glycosylated to form a mature two-chain protein containing a heavy chain (running at 27 and 24 kDa) and a light chain (5 kDa). High levels of cathepsin B are found in macrophages and osteoclasts, as well as various types of cancer cells, including lung, colon, prostate, breast, and stomach. In addition, expression of cathepsin B has been associated with multiple sclerosis (3), rheumatoid arthritis (4), and pancreatitis (5). While generally localized to lysosomes, in cancer alterations can lead to its secretion (6). Its role in tumor progression is thought to involve promotion of basement membrane degradation, invasion and metastasis (7,8). Expression can correlate with poor prognosis for a variety of forms of cancer (9-13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: BNIP3 (Bcl-2/E1B-19kDa interacting protein 3) is a pro-apoptotic mitochondrial protein and Bcl-2 family member that contains a Bcl-2 homology 3 (BH3) domain and a carboxyl-terminal transmembrane (TM) domain (1-3). While BNIP3 has a predicted molecular weight of about 22 kDa, it runs anomalously on SDS-PAGE and includes a band of around 60 kDa that may be a dimeric form that is not reduced (2). BNIP3 associates with anti-apoptotic family members Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and the adenovirus homologue E1B-19kDa. BNIP3 is distinct from other Bcl-2 family members that contain only the BH3 domain in that the TM domain, and not the BH3 domain, is required for mitochondrial targeting and pro-apoptotic activity (4). In addition to apoptosis, BNIP3 has been implicated in necrosis (5) and autophagy (6-11). In hypoxic conditions, BNIP3 can induce mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy) by disrupting the Bcl-2-Beclin-1 complex (9). BNIP3 can also promote mitophagy by triggering the translocation of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin to the mitochondria (10) or by directly binding LC3 on the autophagosome (11). BNIP3 may also localize to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where it can selectively induce the autophagic clearance of ER (ERphagy) (11). Increased expression of BNIP3 under hypoxic conditions is mainly regulated by the transcription factor HIF-1α (12-14). Silencing of the BNIP3 promoter by methylation has been observed in several types of cancer cells and may play an important role in their survival (14-18).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).

$122
20 µl
$307
100 µl
$719
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).

$134
20 µl
$336
100 µl
$792
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, D. melanogaster, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
$630
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).

$134
20 µl
$336
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).