20% off purchase of 3 or more products* | Learn More >>

Monoclonal Antibody Immunofluorescence Immunocytochemistry Nadp Binding

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: IDH1 is one of three isocitrate dehydrogenases that catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). These enzymes exist in two distinct subclasses that utilize either NAD or NADP+ respectively, as an electron acceptor (1). IDH1 is the NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase found in the cytoplasm and peroxisomes. IDH2 and 3 are mitochondrial enzymes that also function in the Krebs cycle. IDH1 is inactivated by phosphorylation at Ser113 and contains a clasp-like domain wherein both polypeptide chains in the dimer interlock (2,3). IDH1 is expressed in a wide range of species and also in organisms that lack a complete citric acid cycle. Mutations in IDH1 have been reported in glioblastoma (4), acute myeloid leukemia (5,6), and other malignancies (7). IDH1 appears to function as a tumor suppressor that, when mutationally inactivated, contributes to tumorigenesis in part through induction of the HIF-1 pathway (8).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated antibody (GAPDH (14C10) Rabbit mAb #2118).
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the phosphorylation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate during glycolysis. Though differentially expressed from tissue to tissue (1), GAPDH is thought to be a constitutively expressed housekeeping protein. For this reason, GAPDH mRNA and protein levels are often measured as controls in experiments quantifying specific changes in expression of other targets. Recent work has elucidated roles for GAPDH in apoptosis (2), gene expression (3), and nuclear transport (4). GAPDH may also play a role in neurodegenerative pathologies such as Huntington and Alzheimer's diseases (4,5).

$117
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the phosphorylation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate during glycolysis. Though differentially expressed from tissue to tissue (1), GAPDH is thought to be a constitutively expressed housekeeping protein. For this reason, GAPDH mRNA and protein levels are often measured as controls in experiments quantifying specific changes in expression of other targets. Recent work has elucidated roles for GAPDH in apoptosis (2), gene expression (3), and nuclear transport (4). GAPDH may also play a role in neurodegenerative pathologies such as Huntington and Alzheimer's diseases (4,5).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated GAPDH (14C10) Rabbit mAb #2118.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the phosphorylation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate during glycolysis. Though differentially expressed from tissue to tissue (1), GAPDH is thought to be a constitutively expressed housekeeping protein. For this reason, GAPDH mRNA and protein levels are often measured as controls in experiments quantifying specific changes in expression of other targets. Recent work has elucidated roles for GAPDH in apoptosis (2), gene expression (3), and nuclear transport (4). GAPDH may also play a role in neurodegenerative pathologies such as Huntington and Alzheimer's diseases (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) is an important enzyme in the cardiovascular system. It catalyzes the production of nitric oxide (NO), a key regulator of blood pressure, vascular remodeling, and angiogenesis (1,2). The activity of eNOS is regulated by phosphorylation at multiple sites. The two most thoroughly studied sites are the activation site Ser1177 and the inhibitory site Thr495 (3). Several protein kinases including Akt/PKB, PKA, and AMPK activate eNOS by phosphorylating Ser1177 in response to various stimuli (4,5). In contrast, bradykinin and H2O2 activate eNOS activity by promoting both Ser1177 phosphorylation and Thr495 dephosphorylation (6,7).

$260
100 µl
$637
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the phosphorylation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate during glycolysis. Though differentially expressed from tissue to tissue (1), GAPDH is thought to be a constitutively expressed housekeeping protein. For this reason, GAPDH mRNA and protein levels are often measured as controls in experiments quantifying specific changes in expression of other targets. Recent work has elucidated roles for GAPDH in apoptosis (2), gene expression (3), and nuclear transport (4). GAPDH may also play a role in neurodegenerative pathologies such as Huntington and Alzheimer's diseases (4,5).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Catalase catalyzes the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen (1). Research studies show that overexpression of this antioxidant enzyme increases the ability of pancreatic β-cells to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS), thereby protecting pancreatic β-cells from oxidative stress (2). The pancreatic β-cells overexpressing this enzyme are also protected from hydrogen peroxide-mediated lipotoxicity, providing further evidence for the importance of catalase in the pathogenesis of diabetes (3).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: IDH2 is one of three isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDH1-3) that catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to produce CO2 and α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). These enzymes belong to two distinct subclasses that utilize either NAD or NADP+ as an electron acceptor. IDH2 is an NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase expressed primarily in the mitochondria, where it also functions in the TCA cycle (1,2). Mutations in IDH2 or its cytoplasmic counterpart (IDH1) have been reported in glioblastoma multiforme (3), acute myeloid leukemia (4,5), and other malignancies (6). Research studies have shown that gain-of-function mutations in IDH2 can lead to the accumulation and secretion of the oncometabolite R-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG) in cancer cells (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Glutamate dehydrogenase is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative deamination of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate through association with the cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (1). Glutamate dehydrogenase is highly expressed in various tissues such as the liver, brain, kidney, heart, pancreas, ovaries, and testis. Two isoforms produced by two distinct genes are found in mammalian tissues. The GLUD1 gene is ubiquitously expressed (2), while the GLUD2 gene is specifically expressed in testicular tissues and astrocytes (3,4). Glutamate dehydrogenase links glutamate to the Krebs cycle, thereby playing a critical role in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Research studies have shown that changes in glutamate dehydrogenase activity in pancreatic β-cells can cause a hyperinsulinism syndrome (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (Sir2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of this family is Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sir2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT6, a mammalian homolog of Sir2, is a nuclear, chromatin-associated protein that promotes the normal maintenance of genome integrity mediated by the base excision repair (BER) pathway (2-4). The BER pathway repairs single-stranded DNA lesions that arise spontaneously from endogenous alkylation, oxidation, and deamination events. SirT6 deficient mice show increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents, including the alkylating agents MMS and H2O2 (2). In addition, these mice show genome instability with increased frequency of fragmented chromosomes, detached centromeres, and gaps (2). SirT6 may regulate the BER pathway by deacetylating DNA Polβ or other core components of the pathway (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CtBP1 (C-terminal binding protein 1) was first recognized as a cellular factor that interacts with the C-terminal portion of adenovirus E1A, a protein involved in the transcriptional regulation of key cellular genes (1). CtBP1 is able to regulate gene activity through its intrinsic dehydrogenase activity (2,3) and by interacting with Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins during development (4). Along with its homologue, CtBP2, it acts as a transcriptional corepressor of zinc-finger homeodomain factor deltaEF1 to regulate a wide range of cellular processes through transrepression mechanisms (5). Through its direct interaction with PRDM16, CtBP1 has been shown to be involved in brown adipose tissue differentiation by mediating the repression of white fat genes and directing differentiation toward the brown fat gene program (6). CtBP1 also plays a role in lipid metabolic pathways and membrane fission by regulating the fission machinery operating Golgi tubular networks (7). CtBP1 has recently been shown to repress transcription of BRCA1 via a redox regulated mechanism (8). Furthermore, it is thought that downregulation of BRCA1 and E-cadherin in invasive ductal breast carcinoma correlates directly with activation of CtBP1 (9).