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Monoclonal Antibody Immunohistochemistry Paraffin Atpase Binding

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The ATPase inhibitor factor 1 (ATPIF1) gene encodes a mitochondrial ATPase inhibitor that limits ATP depletion when mitochondrial respiration is impaired (1). ATPIF1 becomes activated following a drop in pH, binding to β-F1-ATPase, thereby inhibiting the hydrolase activity of the H+-ATP synthase (1,2). In addition to its role as an ATP hydrolase, ATPIF1 has also been shown to play a regulatory role in cellular energy metabolism by triggering the induction of aerobic glycolysis in cancer cells resulting in their Warburg phenotype (3,4). Research studies demonstrate that the overexpression of ATPIF1 in several human carcinomas further supports its participation in oncogenesis and provides insight into the altered metabolism of cancer cells, which includes the reprogramming of energetic metabolism toward glycolysis (3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: HSP40 and HSP40-like proteins represent a large family of chaperone proteins that are homologous to E. coli DnaJ protein (1). These proteins are classified into three subtypes based on their structures. The common feature of the family is a conserved J domain, which is usually located at the amino terminus of proteins and responsible for their association with HSP70 (1,2). Human HSP40, also known as Hdj1, belongs to subtype II that contain a unique Gly/Phe-rich region (2). HSP40 family proteins bind unfolded proteins, prevent their aggregation, and then deliver them to HSP70 (2,3). Another major function of HSP40 is to stimulate ATPase activity of HSP70, which causes conformational change of the unfolded proteins (4,5). The HSP40-HSP70-unfolded protein complex further binds to co-chaperones Hip, Hop and HSP90 or components of the protein degradation machinery such as CHIP and BAG-1, which either leads to protein folding or degradation, respectively (6).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Peptide ELISA (DELFIA), Western Blotting

Background: The ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins function as linkers between the plasma membrane and the actin cytoskeleton and are involved in cell adhesion, membrane ruffling, and microvilli formation (1). ERM proteins undergo intra or intermolecular interaction between their amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, existing as inactive cytosolic monomers or dimers (2). Phosphorylation at a carboxy-terminal threonine residue (Thr567 of ezrin, Thr564 of radixin, Thr558 of moesin) disrupts the amino- and carboxy-terminal association and may play a key role in regulating ERM protein conformation and function (3,4). Phosphorylation at Thr567 of ezrin is required for cytoskeletal rearrangements and oncogene-induced transformation (5). Ezrin is also phosphorylated at tyrosine residues upon growth factor stimulation. Phosphorylation of Tyr353 of ezrin transmits a survival signal during epithelial differentiation (6).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Estrogen receptor α (ERα), a member of the steroid receptor superfamily, contains highly conserved DNA binding and ligand binding domains (1). Through its estrogen-independent and estrogen-dependent activation domains (AF-1 and AF-2, respectively), ERα regulates transcription by recruiting coactivator proteins and interacting with general transcriptional machinery (2). Phosphorylation at multiple sites provides an important mechanism to regulate ERα activity (3-5). Ser104, 106, 118, and 167 are located in the amino-terminal transcription activation function domain AF-1, and phosphorylation of these serine residues plays an important role in regulating ERα activity. Ser118 may be the substrate of the transcription regulatory kinase CDK7 (5). Ser167 may be phosphorylated by p90RSK and Akt (4,6). According to the research literature, phosphorylation at Ser167 may confer tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer patients (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Human progesterone receptor (PR) is expressed as two forms: the full length PR-B and the short form PR-A. PR-A lacks the first 164 amino acid residues of PR-B (1,2). Both PR-A and PR-B are ligand activated, but differ in their relative ability to activate target gene transcription (3,4). The activity of PR is regulated by phosphorylation; at least seven serine residues are phosphorylated in its amino-terminal domain. Three sites (Ser81, Ser102, and Ser162) are unique to full length PR-B, while other sites (Ser190, Ser294, Ser345, and Ser400) are shared by both isoforms (5). Phosphorylation of PR-B at Ser190 (equivalent to Ser26 of PR-A) is catalyzed by CDK2 (6). Mutation of Ser190 results in decreased activity of PR (7), suggesting that the phosphorylation at Ser190 may be critical to its biological function.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Human progesterone receptor (PR) is expressed as two forms: the full length PR-B and the short form PR-A. PR-A lacks the first 164 amino acid residues of PR-B (1,2). Both PR-A and PR-B are ligand activated, but differ in their relative ability to activate target gene transcription (3,4). The activity of PR is regulated by phosphorylation; at least seven serine residues are phosphorylated in its amino-terminal domain. Three sites (Ser81, Ser102, and Ser162) are unique to full length PR-B, while other sites (Ser190, Ser294, Ser345, and Ser400) are shared by both isoforms (5). Phosphorylation of PR-B at Ser190 (equivalent to Ser26 of PR-A) is catalyzed by CDK2 (6). Mutation of Ser190 results in decreased activity of PR (7), suggesting that the phosphorylation at Ser190 may be critical to its biological function.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Human progesterone receptor (PR) is expressed as two forms: the full length PR-B and the short form PR-A. PR-A lacks the first 164 amino acid residues of PR-B (1,2). Both PR-A and PR-B are ligand activated, but differ in their relative ability to activate target gene transcription (3,4). The activity of PR is regulated by phosphorylation; at least seven serine residues are phosphorylated in its amino-terminal domain. Three sites (Ser81, Ser102, and Ser162) are unique to full length PR-B, while other sites (Ser190, Ser294, Ser345, and Ser400) are shared by both isoforms (5). Phosphorylation of PR-B at Ser190 (equivalent to Ser26 of PR-A) is catalyzed by CDK2 (6). Mutation of Ser190 results in decreased activity of PR (7), suggesting that the phosphorylation at Ser190 may be critical to its biological function.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Dog, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 21-24 kDa integral proteins, caveolins, are the principal structural components of the cholesterol/sphingolipid-enriched plasma membrane microdomain caveolae. Three members of the caveolin family (caveolin-1, -2, and -3) have been identified with different tissue distributions. Caveolins form hetero- and homo-oligomers that interact with cholesterol and other lipids (1). Caveolins are involved in diverse biological functions, including vesicular trafficking, cholesterol homeostasis, cell adhesion, and apoptosis, and are also implicated in neurodegenerative disease (2). Caveolins interact with multiple signaling molecules such as Gα subunit, tyrosine kinase receptors, PKCs, Src family tyrosine kinases, and eNOS (1,2). It is believed that caveolins serve as scaffolding proteins for the integration of signal transduction. Phosphorylation at Tyr14 is essential for caveolin association with SH2 or PTB domain-containing adaptor proteins such as GRB7 (3-5). Phosphorylation at Ser80 regulates caveolin binding to the ER membrane and entry into the secretory pathway (6).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Androgen receptor (AR), a zinc finger transcription factor belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily, is activated by phosphorylation and dimerization upon ligand binding (1). This promotes nuclear localization and binding of AR to androgen response elements in androgen target genes. Research studies have shown that AR plays a crucial role in several stages of male development and the progression of prostate cancer (2,3).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Lck belongs to the Src-like non-receptor tyrosine kinase family with the typical Src family kinase structure: a unique amino terminal domain (Src homology 4 domain, SH4) followed by an SH3 domain, an SH2 domain, a kinase domain (SH1), and a carboxy-terminal negative regulatory domain (1). Lck activity is controlled by the interactions of SH2 and SH3 domains as well as tyrosine phosphorylation status of the activation loop (2,3). Lck is recruited to the T cell receptor (TCR) complex upon stimulation and activates downstream tyrosine kinases to initiate T cell signaling (4). Lck is also found to be involved in the regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis pathways and may be responsible for some anticancer drug induced apoptosis (5,6).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The Na,K-ATPase is an integral membrane heterodimer belonging to the P-type ATPase family. This ion channel uses the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to maintain membrane potential by driving sodium export and potassium import across the plasma membrane against their electrochemical gradients. It is composed of a catalytic α subunit and a β subunit (reviewed in 1). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified for the α1 subunit. Tyr10 is phosphorylated by an as yet undetermined kinase (2), Ser16 and Ser23 are phosphorylated by PKC, and Ser943 is phosphorylated by PKA (3-5). All of these sites have been implicated in the regulation of enzyme activity in response to hormones and neurotransmitters, altering trafficking and kinetic properties of Na,K-ATPase. Altered phosphorylation in response to angiotensin II stimulates activity in the rat proximal tubule (6). Na,K-ATPase is also involved in other signal transduction pathways. Insulin regulates its localization in differentiated primary human skeletal muscle cells, and this regulation is dependent on ERK1/2 phosphorylation of the α subunit (7). Na,K-ATPase and Src form a signaling receptor complex that affects regulation of Src kinase activity and, subsequently, its downstream effectors (8,9).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a member of the MRP subfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters (1). MRP1/ABCC1 protein functions as an organic anion transporter. It has a broad range of substrates, including antineoplastic or therapeutic agents and the glutathione (GSH) conjugates of these compounds. MRP1/ABCC1 also transports physiological substrates such as folates, GSH and GSH disulfide (GSSG) conjugates of steroids, leukotrienes, and prostaglandins (2,3).Although MRP1/ABCC1 is generally expressed in normal tissue, upregulation of MRP1/ABCC1 has been found in a variety of solid tumors, including small cell lung cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer (1,4,5). Research studies show that overexpression of MRP1/ABCC1 facilitates the elimination of therapeutic agents from cancer cells and confers drug resistance in those patients. Research studies also show that elevated expression of MRP1/ABCC1 is a negative prognostic marker for breast cancer and small cell lung cancer, as the level of MRP1/ABCC1 is predictive of the response and toxicity of chemotherapeutic agents in those patients (6-10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HSP70 and HSP90 are molecular chaperones expressed constitutively under normal conditions to maintain protein homeostasis and are induced upon environmental stress (1). Both HSP70 and HSP90 are able to interact with unfolded proteins to prevent irreversible aggregation and catalyze the refolding of their substrates in an ATP- and co-chaperone-dependent manner (1). HSP70 has a broad range of substrates including newly synthesized and denatured proteins, while HSP90 tends to have a more limited subset of substrates, most of which are signaling molecules. HSP70 and HSP90 often function collaboratively in a multi-chaperone system, which requires a minimal set of co-chaperones: HSP40, Hop, and p23 (2,3). The co-chaperones either regulate the intrinsic ATPase activity of the chaperones or recruit chaperones to specific substrates or subcellular compartments (1,4). When the ubiquitin ligase CHIP associates with the HSP70/HSP90 complex as a cofactor, the unfolded substrates are subjected to degradation by the proteasome (4). The biological functions of HSP70/HSP90 extend beyond their chaperone activity. They are essential for the maturation and inactivation of nuclear hormones and other signaling molecules (1,3). They also play a role in vesicle formation and protein trafficking (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: MDR1/ABCB1 belongs to the Mdr/Tap subfamily of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily (1). Multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) serves as an efflux pump for xenobiotic compounds with broad substrate specificity. MDR1 substrates include therapeutic agents such as actinomycin D, etoposide, imatinib, and doxorubicin, as well as endogenous molecules including β-amyloids, steroid hormones, lipids, phospholipids, cholesterol, and cytokines (2). Research studies have shown that MDR1 reduces drug accumulation in cancer cells, allowing the development of drug resistance (3-5). On the other hand, MDR1 expressed in the plasma membrane of cells in the blood-brain, blood-cerebral spinal fluid, or blood-placenta barriers restricts the permeability of drugs into these organs from the apical or serosal side (6,7). MDR1 is also expressed in normal tissues with excretory function such as small intestine, liver, and kidney (7). Intracellular MDR1 has been detected in the ER, vesicles, and nuclear envelope, and has been associated with cell trafficking machinery (8). Other reported functions of MDR1 include viral resistance, cytokine trafficking (9,10), and lipid homeostasis in the peripheral and central nervous system (11-13).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1 (NTPDase 1, also known as CD39) is a multi-pass membrane ectoenzyme that metabolizes adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) to regulate purinergic signaling. Purinergic signaling by extracellular ATP and its metabolites regulate many biological processes, including vascular tone, digestion, neuronal function, and inflammation in both normal and diseased states (1). NTPDase 1 is expressed in endothelial cells in the vasculature to regulate local platelet purinergic signaling via metabolism of ATP to adenosine (2). Accordingly, NTPDase 1 regulates platelet activation aggregation and contributes to the antithrombotic properties of endothelial cells (3). ATP and its metabolites also finely modulate the activity of T cells and macrophages (4, 5). Immunomodulation is regulated, in part, by the availability of extracellular ATP and adenosine, suggesting that NTPdase 1 (CD39) may play an immunosuppressive role in the tumor microenvironment.

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: HSP70 and HSP90 are molecular chaperones expressed constitutively under normal conditions to maintain protein homeostasis and are induced upon environmental stress (1). Both HSP70 and HSP90 are able to interact with unfolded proteins to prevent irreversible aggregation and catalyze the refolding of their substrates in an ATP- and co-chaperone-dependent manner (1). HSP70 has a broad range of substrates including newly synthesized and denatured proteins, while HSP90 tends to have a more limited subset of substrates, most of which are signaling molecules. HSP70 and HSP90 often function collaboratively in a multi-chaperone system, which requires a minimal set of co-chaperones: HSP40, Hop, and p23 (2,3). The co-chaperones either regulate the intrinsic ATPase activity of the chaperones or recruit chaperones to specific substrates or subcellular compartments (1,4). When the ubiquitin ligase CHIP associates with the HSP70/HSP90 complex as a cofactor, the unfolded substrates are subjected to degradation by the proteasome (4). The biological functions of HSP70/HSP90 extend beyond their chaperone activity. They are essential for the maturation and inactivation of nuclear hormones and other signaling molecules (1,3). They also play a role in vesicle formation and protein trafficking (2).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ABCG2 (BCRP1/ABCP/MXR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter family that functions as ATP-dependent transporters for a wide variety of chemical compounds and are associated with drug-resistance in cancer cells (1-6). ABCG2 is a heavily glycosylated transmembrane protein with six transmembrane spanning regions consistent with it functioning as a half-transporter. The ABC family can exist as either full-length transporters or as half-transporters that form functional transporters through homo- or heterodimerization. High expression of ABCG2 was found in placenta as well as cell lines selected for resistance to a number of chemotherapeutic drugs, including mitoxantrone, doxorubicin, topotecan and flavopiridol. In rodents, the highest expression of ABCG2 was found in kidney (8). ABCG2 expression has also been observed in stem cell populations, particularly in hematopoietic and neuronal stem cells and is downregulated with differentiation (9-12).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) repairs post-replication DNA, inhibits recombination between non-identical DNA sequences and induces both checkpoint and apoptotic responses following certain types of DNA damage (1). MSH2 (MutS homologue 2) forms the hMutS-α dimer with MSH6 and is an essential component of the mismatch repair process. hMutS-α is part of the BRCA1-associated surveillance complex (BASC), a complex that also contains BRCA1, MLH1, ATM, BLM, PMS2 proteins and the Rad50-Mre11-NBS1 complex (2).Mutations in MSH2 have been found in a large proportion of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch Syndrome), the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer in the Western world (3). Mutations have also been associated with other sporadic tumors.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes play an essential role in the regulation of various nuclear processes, such as gene expression, DNA replication, and repair (1,2). The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex consists of more than 10 subunits with a single molecule of the ATPase catalytic subunit BRM or BRG1, but not both. The activities of these two subunits drive the disruption of histone-DNA contacts that lead to changes in accessibility of crucial regulatory elements within chromatin (2-5). The BRM/BRG1 containing SWI/SNF complexes are recruited to target promoters by transcription factors, such as nuclear receptors, p53, RB, and BRCA1 to regulate gene activation, cell growth, the cell cycle, and differentiation processes (1,6-9). BRM and BRG1 are also considered to be tumor suppressors and their expression levels are severely reduced in several cancer cell lines (10-13).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) repairs post-replication DNA, inhibits recombination between nonidentical DNA sequences, and induces both checkpoint and apoptotic responses following certain types of DNA damage (1). MSH2 (MutS homologue 2) forms the hMutS-α dimer with MSH6 and is an essential component of the mismatch repair process. hMutS-α is part of the BRCA1-associated surveillance complex (BASC), a complex that also contains BRCA1, MLH1, ATM, BLM, PMS2 proteins, and the Rad50-Mre11-NBS1 complex (2). Mutations in MSH6 and other MMR proteins have been found in a large proportion of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch Syndrome), the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer in the Western world (3). Mutations in MSH6 have been shown to occur in glioblastoma in response to temozolomide therapy and to promote temozolomide resistance (4).