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Monoclonal Antibody Immunohistochemistry Paraffin Coreceptor Activity

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Nectin-2, also known as CD112 and poliovirus receptor-related 2 (PVRL2), is a single-pass type I membrane glycoprotein ubiquitously expressed on various human tissues (1). It is a calcium independent cell adhesion molecule known to interact with several cell surface receptors, including DNAM-1 (CD226), LFA-1 (CD11a), Nectin-3 (CD113), TIGIT (VSTM3), and PVRIG (CD112R) (2-7). It is one of the major constituents of adherins junctions, and therefore plays a central role in a number of cellular processes, including adhesion, migration, and proliferation (2-8). Within the immune system, Nectin-2 modulates immune cell signaling. Upon interaction with DNAM-1 expressed on T and NK cells, Nectin-2 stimulates proliferation and cytokine production (4). Upon interaction with PVRIG, Nectin-2 inhibits proliferation (7). Thus, Nectin-2 can be either a co-stimulator or a co-inhibitor of immune cell function depending on competitive receptor interactions. Nectin-2 also serves as an entry for certain mutant strains of herpes simplex virus and pseudorabies virus, and it is involved in cell to cell spreading of these viruses (8,9). Alternate transcriptional splice variants, encoding different isoforms, have been characterized (10,11).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 8 (CD8) is a disulphide-linked heterodimer consisting of the unrelated α and β subunits. Each subunit is a glycoprotein composed of a single extracellular Ig-like domain, a polypeptide linker, a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. On T cells, CD8 is the coreceptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the Ig-like domain of CD8α interacts with the α3-domain of the MHC class I molecule. CD8 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell, and the α chain recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$115
20 µl
$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 4 (CD4) is a glycoprotein composed of an amino-terminal extracellular domain (four domains: D1-D4 with Ig-like structures), a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. CD4 is expressed on the surface of T helper cells, regulatory T cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, and plays an important role in the development and activation of T cells. On T cells, CD4 is the co-receptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the D1 domain of CD4 interacts with the β2-domain of the MHC class II molecule. CD4 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell and recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 8 (CD8) is a disulphide-linked heterodimer consisting of the unrelated α and β subunits. Each subunit is a glycoprotein composed of a single extracellular Ig-like domain, a polypeptide linker, a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. On T cells, CD8 is the coreceptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the Ig-like domain of CD8α interacts with the α3-domain of the MHC class I molecule. CD8 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell, and the α chain recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: CXCR4 is a chemokine receptor that belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor family. It is activated by a small cytokine, CXCL12, also known as stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF-1) (1). The main function of CXCR4 is the mediation of the homing of progenitor cells in the bone marrow and their recruitment to sites of injury (2). More recently, CXCR4 has been studied, as a potential therapeutic target, in the context of autoimmune diseases (3) as well as cancer, as the receptor is involved in the regulation of migration, proliferation, and survival of cancer cells (4).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: CD80 (B7-1, BB1) and CD86 (B7-2, B70) are members of the B7 family of cell surface ligands that regulate T cell activation and immune responses. CD80 is expressed on activated antigen presenting cells, including dendritic cells, B cells, monocytes, and macrophages. CD86 is expressed on resting monocytes, dendritic cells, activated B lymphocytes, and can be further upregulated in the presence of inflammation (1-3). CD80 and CD86 are ligands for CD28, which functions as a T cell costimulatory receptor. Interaction of CD28 with CD80 or CD86 provides the second signal required for naïve T cell activation, T cell proliferation, and acquisition of effector functions (3-7). Alternatively, CD80 and CD86 also act as ligands to CTLA-4, which results in the downregulation of T cell activity (3,7-9).