Microsize antibodies for $99 | Learn More >>

Monoclonal Antibody Immunohistochemistry Paraffin Lipid Raft Formation

Also showing Monoclonal Antibody Immunofluorescence Immunocytochemistry Lipid Raft Formation

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Despite their relatively small size (8-12 kDa) and uncomplicated architecture, S100 proteins regulate a variety of cellular processes such as cell growth and motility, cell cycle progression, transcription, and differentiation. To date, 25 members have been identified, including S100A1-S100A18, trichohyalin, filaggrin, repetin, S100P, and S100Z, making it the largest group in the EF-hand, calcium-binding protein family. Interestingly, 14 S100 genes are clustered on human chromosome 1q21, a region of genomic instability. Research studies have demonstrated that significant correlation exists between aberrant S100 protein expression and cancer progression. S100 proteins primarily mediate immune responses in various tissue types but are also involved in neuronal development (1-4).Each S100 monomer bears two EF-hand motifs and can bind up to two molecules of calcium (or other divalent cation in some instances). Structural evidence shows that S100 proteins form antiparallel homo- or heterodimers that coordinate binding partner proximity in a calcium-dependent (and sometimes calcium-independent) manner. Although structurally and functionally similar, individual members show restricted tissue distribution, are localized in specific cellular compartments, and display unique protein binding partners, which suggests that each plays a specific role in various signaling pathways. In addition to an intracellular role, some S100 proteins have been shown to act as receptors for extracellular ligands or are secreted and exhibit cytokine-like activities (1-4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Annexin A2 (ANXA2), also known as lipocortin II or calpactin-1 heavy chain, is a 36 kDa member of the annexin superfamily that binds phospholipids and other proteins in a calcium-dependent manner via annexin repeats (1). Annexin A2 contains four such repeats through which it mediates protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions (1-4). It forms a constitutive heterotetramer with S100A10, acting as a bridge between the actin cytoskeleton, plasma membrane, and endocytotic vesicle machinery (5-7). Originally identified as a protein inhibitor of phospholipase A2, annexin A2 has subsequently been shown to interact with an array of protein and non-protein partners, including F-actin, spectrin, SNARE complexes, RNA, and virus particles (4,6,8,9). Annexin A2 has also been shown to have receptor-like activity and is detected on the surface of macrophages and vascular endothelial cells where it mediates macrophage activation and Factor Xa signaling, respectively (10-13). Upregulation of annexin A2 at the cell surface is thought to be modulated by phosphorylation at Tyr23 by Src (14-18). Interestingly, phosphorylation at Tyr23 has recently been shown to be required for cell surface expression of annexin A2 where it mediates motility, invasiveness, and overall metastatic potential of certain pancreatic cancer cells (19,20). Annexin A2 has also been shown to be heavily phosphorylated on serine residues in response to PKC activation via a pleiotropic mechanism (21-23). For a complete list of curated phosphorylation sites on annexin A2, please see PhosphoSitePlus® at www.phosphosite.org.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Flotillins belong to a family of lipid raft-associated integral membrane proteins that carry an evolutionarily conserved domain called the prohibitin homology domain (PHB) (1). Flotillin members are ubiquitously expressed and located in noncaveolar microdomains (lipid rafts) on the plasma membrane where they support signal transduction and regulate lipid raft motility and localization (2-5). Two flotillin members have been described, flotillin-1 and flotillin-2. In addition to its colocalization with lipid rafts on the plasma membrane, flotillin-1 also has been found in compartments of the endocytic and autophagosomal pathways, such as recycling/late endosomes, the Golgi complex, and the nucleus (6,7). Flotillin-2 is mainly localized to the plasma membrane and is prevalent in cell-cell contact sites. However, overexpressed flotillin-2 has also been found in the late endosome (4,8,9). Both flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 are commonly used as lipid raft-associated markers.