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Monoclonal Antibody Immunohistochemistry Paraffin Mitochondrial Calcium Ion Transport

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Stomatin-like protein 2 (SLP-2 and also known as STOML2) is a lipid-anchored mitochondrial protein that is part of a large protein complex that regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Proteomic studies identified SLP-2 as a widely expressed mitochondria-enriched protein (1). As a member of both the stomatin family and stomatin-prohibitin-flotillin-HfLC/K (SPFH) superfamily of proteins, SLP-2 forms large hetero-oligomeric complexes with other mitochondrial proteins, including prohibtin, mitofusin 2, and cardiolipin (2, 3). SLP-2 contains a highly conserved SPFH domain that mediates its ability to associate with the mitochondrial inner membrane and form specialized membrane microdomains. As an inner membrane organizer of other mitochondrial proteins, SLP-2 performs multiple mitochondrial functions, including regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, energy/calcium homeostasis, translation, and mitochondrial-mediated cellular stress responses (3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8). Enhanced SLP-2 expression is also associated with several human cancers, including gallbladder, rectal, and gastric cancer (9, 10, 11).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), ubiquitously expressed and located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, is generally thought to be the primary means by which metabolites diffuse in and out of the mitochondria (1). In addition, this channel plays a role in apoptotic signaling. The change in mitochondrial permeability characteristic of apoptosis is mediated by Bcl-2 family proteins, which bind to VDAC, altering the channel kinetics (2). Homodimerization of VDAC may be a mechanism for changing mitochondrial permeability and supporting release of cytochrome c (3). In mammalian cells, there are three VDAC isoforms, VDAC1, which is the most widely expressed isoform, as well as VDAC2 and VDAC3 (4,5).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Class A basic helix-loop-helix protein 15 (MIST1, bHLHa15) is a highly conserved basic helix loop helix family transcription factor that binds E-box motifs and regulates the expression of developmentally regulated genes (1). MIST1 can bind DNA as a homodimer, or may heterodimerize with other bHLH proteins to regulate target gene expression (1). MIST1 is expressed in an array of tissues, including salivary glands, stomach, small intestine, and the pancreas, but is generally restricted to secretory cell subtypes (2). In the pancreas, MIST1 is essential for the maturation, maintenance, and function of acinar cells (3). In gastric chief cells, MIST1 regulates the expression of RAB26 and RAB3D, two GTPases that function to regulate secretory granule formation (4). Loss of MIST1 in gastric chief cells may be a potential marker of gastric epithelial neoplasia (5).

$115
20 µl
$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bcl-2 exerts a survival function in response to a wide range of apoptotic stimuli through inhibition of mitochondrial cytochrome c release (1). It has been implicated in modulating mitochondrial calcium homeostasis and proton flux (2). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified within Bcl-2 including Thr56, Ser70, Thr74, and Ser87 (3). It has been suggested that these phosphorylation sites may be targets of the ASK1/MKK7/JNK1 pathway and that phosphorylation of Bcl-2 may be a marker for mitotic events (4,5). Mutation of Bcl-2 at Thr56 or Ser87 inhibits its anti-apoptotic activity during glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis of T lymphocytes (6). Interleukin-3 and JNK-induced Bcl-2 phosphorylation at Ser70 may be required for its enhanced anti-apoptotic functions (7).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Adenosine Receptor A2a (A2AR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). As a member of the purinergic adenosine receptors (A1, A2, and A3), A2AR activates classic G-protein signaling pathways upon binding of adenosine (1). Adenosine is present in all cells and extracellular fluids. Adenosine signaling, via A2AR, is mobilized during both physiological and pathological conditions. For example, adenosine, via A2AR, modulates neuronal function, acting to fine-tune neuronal function (2). A2AR function is modulated, in part, by its ability to form functional heteromers with other GPCRs, including dopamine receptors (D1 and D3), metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR5), and others (3). In the brain, A2AR is enriched in the basal ganglia, suggesting that A2AR may be a potential drug target for neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s disease, drug addiction, and psychiatric disorders (4). Outside of the brain, A2AR may act as an immune checkpoint molecule to maintain an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, an environment that exhibits relatively elevated adenosine levels (5, 6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: α-Synuclein is a protein of 140-amino acids expressed abundantly in the brain. α-Synuclein is also the main component of pathogenic Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. Research studies have shown that mutations of the α-synuclein gene are linked to Parkinson's disease (1).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: α-Synuclein is a protein of 140-amino acids expressed abundantly in the brain. α-Synuclein is also the main component of pathogenic Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. Research studies have shown that mutations of the α-synuclein gene are linked to Parkinson's disease (1).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: α-Synuclein is a protein of 140-amino acids expressed abundantly in the brain. α-Synuclein is also the main component of pathogenic Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. Research studies have shown that mutations of the α-synuclein gene are linked to Parkinson's disease (1).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Huntington's Disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by psychiatric, cognitive, and motor dysfunction. Neuropathology of HD involves specific neuronal subpopulations: GABA-ergic neurons of the striatum and neurons within the cerebral cortex selectively degenerate (1,2). The genetic analysis of HD has been the flagship study of inherited neurological diseases from initial chromosomal localization to identification of the gene.Huntingtin is a large (340-350 kD) cytosolic protein that may be involved in a number of cellular functions such as transcription, gastrulation, neurogenesis, neurotransmission, axonal transport, neural positioning, and apoptosis (2,3). The HD gene from unaffected individuals contains between 6 and 34 CAG trinucleotide repeats, with expansion beyond this range causing the onset of disease symptoms. A strong inverse correlation exists between the age of onset in patients and the number of huntingtin gene CAG repeats encoding a stretch of polyglutamine peptides (1,2). The huntingtin protein undergoes numerous post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, ubiquitination, sumoylation, palmitoylation, and cleavage (2). Phosphorylation of Ser421 by Akt can partially counteract the toxicity that results from the expanded polyglutamine tract. Varying Akt expression in the brain correlates with regional differences in huntingtin protein phosphorylation; this pattern inversely correlates with the regions that are most affected by degeneration in diseased brain (2). A key step in the disease is the proteolytic cleavage of huntingtin protein into amino-terminal fragments that contain expanded glutamine repeats and translocate into the nucleus. Caspase mediated cleavage of huntingtin at Asp513 is associated with increased polyglutamine aggregate formation and toxicity. Phosphorylation of Ser434 by CDK5 protects against cleavage (2,3).