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Monoclonal Antibody Immunohistochemistry Paraffin Positive Regulation of Autophagy

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Transcription factor EB (TFEB) is a member of the Myc-related, bHLH leucine-zipper family of transcription factors that drives the expression of a network of genes known as the Coordinated Lysosomal Expression and Regulation (CLEAR) network (1,2). TFEB specifically recognizes and binds regulatory sequences within the CLEAR box (GTCACGTGAC) of lysosomal and autophagy genes, resulting in the up-regulated expression of genes involved in lysosome biogenesis and function, and regulation of autophagy (1,2). TFEB is activated in response to nutrient deprivation, stimulating translocation to the nucleus where it forms homo- or heterooligomers with other members of the microphthalmia transcription factor (MiTF) subfamily and resulting in up-regulation of autophagosomes and lysosomes (3-5). Recently, it has been shown that TFEB is a component of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1), which regulates the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of TFEB in response to cellular starvation and stress (6-9). During normal growth conditions, TFEB is phosphorylated at Ser211 in an mTORC1-dependent manner. Phosphorylation promotes association of TFEB with 14-3-3 family proteins and retention in the cytosol. Inhibition of mTORC1 results in a loss of TFEB phosphorylation, dissociation of the TFEB/14-3-3 complex, and rapid transport of TFEB to the nucleus where it increases transcription of CLEAR and autophagy genes (10). TFEB has also been shown to be activated in a nutrient-dependent manner by p42 MAP kinase (Erk2). TFEB is phosphorylated at Ser142 by Erk2 in response to nutrient deprivation, resulting in nuclear localization and activation, and indicating that pathways other than mTOR contribute to nutrient sensing via TFEB (3).

$122
20 µl
$307
100 µl
$719
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, S. cerevisiae

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5). AMPKα is also phosphorylated at Thr258 and Ser485 (for α1; Ser491 for α2). The upstream kinase and the biological significance of these phosphorylation events have yet to be elucidated (6). The β1 subunit is post-translationally modified by myristoylation and multi-site phosphorylation including Ser24/25, Ser96, Ser101, Ser108, and Ser182 (6,7). Phosphorylation at Ser108 of the β1 subunit seems to be required for the activation of AMPK enzyme, while phosphorylation at Ser24/25 and Ser182 affects AMPK localization (7). Several mutations in AMPKγ subunits have been identified, most of which are located in the putative AMP/ATP binding sites (CBS or Bateman domains). Mutations at these sites lead to reduction of AMPK activity and cause glycogen accumulation in heart or skeletal muscle (1,2). Accumulating evidence indicates that AMPK not only regulates the metabolism of fatty acids and glycogen, but also modulates protein synthesis and cell growth through EF2 and TSC2/mTOR pathways, as well as blood flow via eNOS/nNOS (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: BNIP3 (Bcl-2/E1B-19kDa interacting protein 3) is a pro-apoptotic mitochondrial protein and Bcl-2 family member that contains a Bcl-2 homology 3 (BH3) domain and a carboxyl-terminal transmembrane (TM) domain (1-3). While BNIP3 has a predicted molecular weight of about 22 kDa, it runs anomalously on SDS-PAGE and includes a band of around 60 kDa that may be a dimeric form that is not reduced (2). BNIP3 associates with anti-apoptotic family members Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and the adenovirus homologue E1B-19kDa. BNIP3 is distinct from other Bcl-2 family members that contain only the BH3 domain in that the TM domain, and not the BH3 domain, is required for mitochondrial targeting and pro-apoptotic activity (4). In addition to apoptosis, BNIP3 has been implicated in necrosis (5) and autophagy (6-11). In hypoxic conditions, BNIP3 can induce mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy) by disrupting the Bcl-2-Beclin-1 complex (9). BNIP3 can also promote mitophagy by triggering the translocation of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin to the mitochondria (10) or by directly binding LC3 on the autophagosome (11). BNIP3 may also localize to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where it can selectively induce the autophagic clearance of ER (ERphagy) (11). Increased expression of BNIP3 under hypoxic conditions is mainly regulated by the transcription factor HIF-1α (12-14). Silencing of the BNIP3 promoter by methylation has been observed in several types of cancer cells and may play an important role in their survival (14-18).

$348
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is highly conserved from yeast to plants and animals and plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis (1). AMPK is a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, each of which is encoded by two or three distinct genes (α1, 2; β1, 2; γ1, 2, 3) (2). The kinase is activated by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio due to cellular and environmental stress, such as heat shock, hypoxia, and ischemia (1). The tumor suppressor LKB1, in association with accessory proteins STRAD and MO25, phosphorylates AMPKα at Thr172 in the activation loop, and this phosphorylation is required for AMPK activation (3-5). AMPKα is also phosphorylated at Thr258 and Ser485 (for α1; Ser491 for α2). The upstream kinase and the biological significance of these phosphorylation events have yet to be elucidated (6). The β1 subunit is post-translationally modified by myristoylation and multi-site phosphorylation including Ser24/25, Ser96, Ser101, Ser108, and Ser182 (6,7). Phosphorylation at Ser108 of the β1 subunit seems to be required for the activation of AMPK enzyme, while phosphorylation at Ser24/25 and Ser182 affects AMPK localization (7). Several mutations in AMPKγ subunits have been identified, most of which are located in the putative AMP/ATP binding sites (CBS or Bateman domains). Mutations at these sites lead to reduction of AMPK activity and cause glycogen accumulation in heart or skeletal muscle (1,2). Accumulating evidence indicates that AMPK not only regulates the metabolism of fatty acids and glycogen, but also modulates protein synthesis and cell growth through EF2 and TSC2/mTOR pathways, as well as blood flow via eNOS/nNOS (1).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Forkhead family of transcription factors is involved in tumorigenesis of rhabdomyosarcoma and acute leukemias (1-3). Within the family, three members (FoxO1, FoxO4, and FoxO3a) have sequence similarity to the nematode orthologue DAF-16, which mediates signaling via a pathway involving IGFR1, PI3K, and Akt (4-6). Active forkhead members act as tumor suppressors by promoting cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Increased expression of any FoxO member results in the activation of the cell cycle inhibitor p27 Kip1. Forkhead transcription factors also play a part in TGF-β-mediated upregulation of p21 Cip1, a process negatively regulated through PI3K (7). Increased proliferation results when forkhead transcription factors are inactivated through phosphorylation by Akt at Thr24, Ser256, and Ser319, which results in nuclear export and inhibition of transcription factor activity (8). Forkhead transcription factors can also be inhibited by the deacetylase sirtuin (SirT1) (9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Forkhead family of transcription factors is involved in tumorigenesis of rhabdomyosarcoma and acute leukemias (1-3). Within the family, three members (FoxO1, FoxO4, and FoxO3a) have sequence similarity to the nematode orthologue DAF-16, which mediates signaling via a pathway involving IGFR1, PI3K, and Akt (4-6). Active forkhead members act as tumor suppressors by promoting cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Increased expression of any FoxO member results in the activation of the cell cycle inhibitor p27 Kip1. Forkhead transcription factors also play a part in TGF-β-mediated upregulation of p21 Cip1, a process negatively regulated through PI3K (7). Increased proliferation results when forkhead transcription factors are inactivated through phosphorylation by Akt at Thr24, Ser256, and Ser319, which results in nuclear export and inhibition of transcription factor activity (8). Forkhead transcription factors can also be inhibited by the deacetylase sirtuin (SirT1) (9).

$122
20 µl
$307
100 µl
$719
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Bad is a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family that promotes cell death by displacing Bax from binding to Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL (1,2). Survival factors, such as IL-3, inhibit the apoptotic activity of Bad by activating intracellular signaling pathways that result in the phosphorylation of Bad at Ser112 and Ser136 (2). Phosphorylation at these sites promotes binding of Bad to 14-3-3 proteins to prevent an association between Bad with Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL (2). Akt phosphorylates Bad at Ser136 to promote cell survival (3,4). Bad is phosphorylated at Ser112 both in vivo and in vitro by p90RSK (5,6) and mitochondria-anchored PKA (7). Phosphorylation at Ser155 in the BH3 domain by PKA plays a critical role in blocking the dimerization of Bad and Bcl-xL (8-10).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Lyric/AEG-1 (Astrocyte Elevated Gene 1)/MTDH (Metadherin) was identified as a tight junction (TJ) protein based on its localization to TJ proteins in polarized epithelium (1).Differential subcellular localization and overexpression of Lyric/AEG-1/MTDH has been seen in multiple human cancers. Lyric/AEG-1/MTDH is involved in signaling pathways related to various cellular functions including proliferation and apoptosis/survival, and its alteration in cancer is associated with poor prognosis (reviewed in 2). In breast cancer, increased Lyric/AEG-1/MTDH may confer increased chemoresistance as well as metastasis (3,4). Lyric/AEG-1/MTDH expression is important in signaling and disease progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (5) and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1, p62) is a ubiquitin binding protein involved in cell signaling, oxidative stress, and autophagy (1-4). It was first identified as a protein that binds to the SH2 domain of p56Lck (5) and independently found to interact with PKCζ (6,7). SQSTM1 was subsequently found to interact with ubiquitin, providing a scaffold for several signaling proteins and triggering degradation of proteins through the proteasome or lysosome (8). Interaction between SQSTM1 and TRAF6 leads to the K63-linked polyubiquitination of TRAF6 and subsequent activation of the NF-κB pathway (9). Protein aggregates formed by SQSTM1 can be degraded by the autophagosome (4,10,11). SQSTM1 binds autophagosomal membrane protein LC3/Atg8, bringing SQSTM1-containing protein aggregates to the autophagosome (12). Lysosomal degradation of autophagosomes leads to a decrease in SQSTM1 levels during autophagy; conversely, autophagy inhibitors stabilize SQSTM1 levels. Studies have demonstrated a link between SQSTM1 and oxidative stress. SQSTM1 interacts with KEAP1, which is a cytoplasmic inhibitor of NRF2, a key transcription factor involved in cellular responses to oxidative stress (3). Thus, accumulation of SQSTM1 can lead to an increase in NRF2 activity.

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1, p62) is a ubiquitin binding protein involved in cell signaling, oxidative stress, and autophagy (1-4). It was first identified as a protein that binds to the SH2 domain of p56Lck (5) and independently found to interact with PKCζ (6,7). SQSTM1 was subsequently found to interact with ubiquitin, providing a scaffold for several signaling proteins and triggering degradation of proteins through the proteasome or lysosome (8). Interaction between SQSTM1 and TRAF6 leads to the K63-linked polyubiquitination of TRAF6 and subsequent activation of the NF-κB pathway (9). Protein aggregates formed by SQSTM1 can be degraded by the autophagosome (4,10,11). SQSTM1 binds autophagosomal membrane protein LC3/Atg8, bringing SQSTM1-containing protein aggregates to the autophagosome (12). Lysosomal degradation of autophagosomes leads to a decrease in SQSTM1 levels during autophagy; conversely, autophagy inhibitors stabilize SQSTM1 levels. Studies have demonstrated a link between SQSTM1 and oxidative stress. SQSTM1 interacts with KEAP1, which is a cytoplasmic inhibitor of NRF2, a key transcription factor involved in cellular responses to oxidative stress (3). Thus, accumulation of SQSTM1 can lead to an increase in NRF2 activity.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1, p62) is a ubiquitin binding protein involved in cell signaling, oxidative stress, and autophagy (1-4). It was first identified as a protein that binds to the SH2 domain of p56Lck (5) and independently found to interact with PKCζ (6,7). SQSTM1 was subsequently found to interact with ubiquitin, providing a scaffold for several signaling proteins and triggering degradation of proteins through the proteasome or lysosome (8). Interaction between SQSTM1 and TRAF6 leads to the K63-linked polyubiquitination of TRAF6 and subsequent activation of the NF-κB pathway (9). Protein aggregates formed by SQSTM1 can be degraded by the autophagosome (4,10,11). SQSTM1 binds autophagosomal membrane protein LC3/Atg8, bringing SQSTM1-containing protein aggregates to the autophagosome (12). Lysosomal degradation of autophagosomes leads to a decrease in SQSTM1 levels during autophagy; conversely, autophagy inhibitors stabilize SQSTM1 levels. Studies have demonstrated a link between SQSTM1 and oxidative stress. SQSTM1 interacts with KEAP1, which is a cytoplasmic inhibitor of NRF2, a key transcription factor involved in cellular responses to oxidative stress (3). Thus, accumulation of SQSTM1 can lead to an increase in NRF2 activity.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 and 2 (LAMP1 and LAMP2) are two abundant lysosomal membrane proteins (1,2). Both are transmembrane proteins and are heavily glycosylated at the amino-terminal luminal side of the lysosomal inner leaflet, which protects the proteins from proteolysis (3). The carboxy terminus of LAMP1 is exposed to the cytoplasm and contains a tyrosine sorting motif that targets LAMP to lysosomal membranes (4). LAMP1 and LAMP2 are 37% homologous in their protein sequences. Both LAMP1 and LAMP2 are involved in regulating lysosomal motility during lysosome-phagosome fusion and cholesterol trafficking (5,6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bcl-xL prevents apoptosis through two different mechanisms: heterodimerization with an apoptotic protein inhibits its apoptotic effect (1,2) and formation of mitochondrial outer membrane pores help maintain a normal membrane state under stressful conditions (3). Bcl-xL is phosphorylated by JNK following treatment with microtubule-damaging agents such as paclitaxel, vinblastine and nocodazole (4,5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Paraffin), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Tau is a heterogeneous microtubule-associated protein that promotes and stabilizes microtubule assembly, especially in axons. Six isoforms with different amino-terminal inserts and different numbers of tandem repeats near the carboxy terminus have been identified, and tau is hyperphosphorylated at approximately 25 sites by Erk, GSK-3, and CDK5 (1,2). Phosphorylation decreases the ability of tau to bind to microtubules. Neurofibrillary tangles are a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease; these tangles are bundles of paired helical filaments composed of hyperphosphorylated tau. In particular, phosphorylation at Ser396 by GSK-3 or CDK5 destabilizes microtubules. Furthermore, research studies have shown that inclusions of tau are found in a number of other neurodegenerative diseases, collectively known as tauopathies (1,3).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The mTORC1 kinase complex is a critical regulator of cell growth (1,2). Its activity is modulated by energy levels, growth factors, and amino acids via signaling through Akt, MAPK, and AMPK pathways (3,4). Recent studies found that the four related GTPases, RagA, RagB, RagC, and RagD, interact with raptor within the mTORC1 complex (1,2). These interactions are both necessary and sufficient for mTORC1 activation in response to amino acid signals (1,2).

$115
20 µl
$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Bcl-2 exerts a survival function in response to a wide range of apoptotic stimuli through inhibition of mitochondrial cytochrome c release (1). It has been implicated in modulating mitochondrial calcium homeostasis and proton flux (2). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified within Bcl-2 including Thr56, Ser70, Thr74, and Ser87 (3). It has been suggested that these phosphorylation sites may be targets of the ASK1/MKK7/JNK1 pathway and that phosphorylation of Bcl-2 may be a marker for mitotic events (4,5). Mutation of Bcl-2 at Thr56 or Ser87 inhibits its anti-apoptotic activity during glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis of T lymphocytes (6). Interleukin-3 and JNK-induced Bcl-2 phosphorylation at Ser70 may be required for its enhanced anti-apoptotic functions (7).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: S100A8 and S100A9 are calcium-binding proteins that form a noncovalent heterodimer present in monocytes, neutrophils, macrophages, and some epithelial cells (1, 2). S100A8 and S100A9 are secreted by a tubulin-dependent mechanism during inflammatory conditions and have antimicrobial and chemotactic functions (3-5). Extracellular S100A8/S100A9 also induces an inflammatory response in endothelial cells, including induction of proinflammatory chemokines and adhesion molecules and increased vascular permeability (6). S100A8/S100A9 induces and recruits myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in tumor-bearing mice (7). MDSC produce additional S100A8/S100A9 themselves, resulting in a positive feedback mechanism that sustains MDSC accumulation (7). S100A8/S100A9 is also highly expressed in psoriatic skin, where it directly upregulates transcription of complement protein C3, which contributes to disease (8). In addition, tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells induce expression of S100A8 and S100A9 in cancer cells, which increases invasiveness and metastasis (9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, FRAP, RAFT) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase (1-3) that functions as an ATP and amino acid sensor to balance nutrient availability and cell growth (4,5). When sufficient nutrients are available, mTOR responds to a phosphatidic acid-mediated signal to transmit a positive signal to p70 S6 kinase and participate in the inactivation of the eIF4E inhibitor, 4E-BP1 (6). These events result in the translation of specific mRNA subpopulations. mTOR is phosphorylated at Ser2448 via the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway and autophosphorylated at Ser2481 (7,8). mTOR plays a key role in cell growth and homeostasis and may be abnormally regulated in tumors. For these reasons, mTOR is currently under investigation as a potential target for anti-cancer therapy (9).

$307
100 µl
$719
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Akt, also referred to as PKB or Rac, plays a critical role in controlling survival and apoptosis (1-3). This protein kinase is activated by insulin and various growth and survival factors to function in a wortmannin-sensitive pathway involving PI3 kinase (2,3). Akt is activated by phospholipid binding and activation loop phosphorylation at Thr308 by PDK1 (4) and by phosphorylation within the carboxy terminus at Ser473. The previously elusive PDK2 responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 has been identified as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a rapamycin-insensitive complex with rictor and Sin1 (5,6). Akt promotes cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis through phosphorylation and inactivation of several targets, including Bad (7), forkhead transcription factors (8), c-Raf (9), and caspase-9. PTEN phosphatase is a major negative regulator of the PI3 kinase/Akt signaling pathway (10). LY294002 is a specific PI3 kinase inhibitor (11). Another essential Akt function is the regulation of glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3α and β (12,13). Akt may also play a role in insulin stimulation of glucose transport (12). In addition to its role in survival and glycogen synthesis, Akt is involved in cell cycle regulation by preventing GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of cyclin D1 (14) and by negatively regulating the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 Kip1 (15) and p21 Waf1/Cip1 (16). Akt also plays a critical role in cell growth by directly phosphorylating mTOR in a rapamycin-sensitive complex containing raptor (17). More importantly, Akt phosphorylates and inactivates tuberin (TSC2), an inhibitor of mTOR within the mTOR-raptor complex (18,19).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) belongs to a family of highly conserved proteins that contain HMG box domains (1,2). All three family members (HMGB1, HMGB2, and HMGB3) contain two HMG box domains and a C-terminal acidic domain. HMGB1 is a widely expressed and highly abundant protein (2). HMGB2 is widely expressed during embryonic development, but is restricted to lymphoid organs and testis in adult animals (3). HMGB3 is only expressed during embryogenesis (4). While expression varies, the biochemical properties of the different family members may be indistinguishable. The HMG box domains facilitate the binding of HMGB proteins to the minor groove of DNA, which results in local bending of the DNA double helix (1,2). HMGB proteins are recruited by and help facilitate the assembly of site-specific DNA binding proteins to their cognate binding sites in chromatin. For example, HMGB1 facilitates the binding of Hox proteins, Oct-1, p53, Rel proteins, and steroid hormone receptor proteins to their target gene promoters (1,2). In addition to their functions in the nucleus, HMGB proteins play a significant role in extracellular signaling associated with inflammation (5,6). HMGB1 is massively released into the extracellular environment during cell necrosis, but not apoptosis. Extracellular HMGB1 "alarms" the innate immune system by acting as a chemoattractant for inflammatory leukocytes, smooth muscle cells, and stem cells, functioning as an immune adjuvant for soluble and particulate antigens, and triggering activation of T cells and dendritic cells. In addition, activated monocytes, macrophages and, dendritic cells also secrete HMGB1, forming a positive feedback loop that results in the release of additional cytokines and neutrophils. Hypoxia has also been shown to cause the release of HMGB1 in the liver, and some studies suggest a role for extracellular HMGB1 in tumor homeostasis (5,6).