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Monoclonal Antibody Immunohistochemistry Paraffin Steroid Hormone Receptor Binding

Also showing Monoclonal Antibody Immunohistochemistry Paraffin Steroid Hormone Receptor Activity

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DSS-AHC critical region on the X chromosome protein 1 (DAX1) is an orphan nuclear receptor encoded by the nuclear receptor subfamily 0 group B member 1 (NR0B1) gene. DAX1 possesses an atypical DNA binding domain that allows it to form heterodimeric complexes with DNA binding partners and repress transcriptional activity (1,2). During development, DAX1 is important for establishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal gonadal axis. The receptor is essential for development of several important hormone-producing organs that determine this axis, including the adrenal glands, pituitary, hypothalamus, and the male and female reproductive organs (3,4). Research studies suggest that DAX1 plays a role in maintenance of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (5,6). Loss of DAX1 function through deletion or mutation results in adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (7), while duplication of the NR0B1 gene on the X-chromosome causes dosage-sensitive sex reversal (8).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Estrogen receptor α (ERα), a member of the steroid receptor superfamily, contains highly conserved DNA binding and ligand binding domains (1). Through its estrogen-independent and estrogen-dependent activation domains (AF-1 and AF-2, respectively), ERα regulates transcription by recruiting coactivator proteins and interacting with general transcriptional machinery (2). Phosphorylation at multiple sites provides an important mechanism to regulate ERα activity (3-5). Ser104, 106, 118, and 167 are located in the amino-terminal transcription activation function domain AF-1, and phosphorylation of these serine residues plays an important role in regulating ERα activity. Ser118 may be the substrate of the transcription regulatory kinase CDK7 (5). Ser167 may be phosphorylated by p90RSK and Akt (4,6). According to the research literature, phosphorylation at Ser167 may confer tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer patients (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Human progesterone receptor (PR) is expressed as two forms: the full length PR-B and the short form PR-A. PR-A lacks the first 164 amino acid residues of PR-B (1,2). Both PR-A and PR-B are ligand activated, but differ in their relative ability to activate target gene transcription (3,4). The activity of PR is regulated by phosphorylation; at least seven serine residues are phosphorylated in its amino-terminal domain. Three sites (Ser81, Ser102, and Ser162) are unique to full length PR-B, while other sites (Ser190, Ser294, Ser345, and Ser400) are shared by both isoforms (5). Phosphorylation of PR-B at Ser190 (equivalent to Ser26 of PR-A) is catalyzed by CDK2 (6). Mutation of Ser190 results in decreased activity of PR (7), suggesting that the phosphorylation at Ser190 may be critical to its biological function.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Human progesterone receptor (PR) is expressed as two forms: the full length PR-B and the short form PR-A. PR-A lacks the first 164 amino acid residues of PR-B (1,2). Both PR-A and PR-B are ligand activated, but differ in their relative ability to activate target gene transcription (3,4). The activity of PR is regulated by phosphorylation; at least seven serine residues are phosphorylated in its amino-terminal domain. Three sites (Ser81, Ser102, and Ser162) are unique to full length PR-B, while other sites (Ser190, Ser294, Ser345, and Ser400) are shared by both isoforms (5). Phosphorylation of PR-B at Ser190 (equivalent to Ser26 of PR-A) is catalyzed by CDK2 (6). Mutation of Ser190 results in decreased activity of PR (7), suggesting that the phosphorylation at Ser190 may be critical to its biological function.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Human progesterone receptor (PR) is expressed as two forms: the full length PR-B and the short form PR-A. PR-A lacks the first 164 amino acid residues of PR-B (1,2). Both PR-A and PR-B are ligand activated, but differ in their relative ability to activate target gene transcription (3,4). The activity of PR is regulated by phosphorylation; at least seven serine residues are phosphorylated in its amino-terminal domain. Three sites (Ser81, Ser102, and Ser162) are unique to full length PR-B, while other sites (Ser190, Ser294, Ser345, and Ser400) are shared by both isoforms (5). Phosphorylation of PR-B at Ser190 (equivalent to Ser26 of PR-A) is catalyzed by CDK2 (6). Mutation of Ser190 results in decreased activity of PR (7), suggesting that the phosphorylation at Ser190 may be critical to its biological function.

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Nuclear retinoic acid (RA) receptors (RARs) consist of three subtypes encoded by separate genes: α (NR1B1), β (NR1B2), and γ (NR1B3). For each subtype, there are at least two isoforms, which are generated by differential promoter usage and alternative splicing and differ only in their N-terminal regions. Retinoids, which are metabolites of vitamin A, serve as ligands for RARs (1). RARs function as ligand-dependent transcriptional regulators and are found to be heterodimerized with retinoid X receptors (RXRs). These transcriptionally active dimers regulate the expression of genes involved in cellular differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis (2,3). Consequently, RARs play critical roles in a variety of biological processes, including development, reproduction, immunity, and organogenesis (4-6). RAR mutations, fusion proteins, altered expression levels, or aberrant post-translational modifications result in multiple diseases due to altered RAR function and disruption of homeostasis.In contrast to the ubiquitously expressed RARα subtype, RARγ displays a complex tissue-specific expression pattern (7). The hematopoietic system expresses significant levels of RARγ, and a recent study identified a role for RARγ in hematopoietic stem cell maintenance (8). RARγ is the predominant subtype in human and mouse epidermis, representing 90% of the RARs in this tissue (9-11). Given the high level of RARγ expression in the skin, it has been suggested that this nuclear receptor participates in a transcriptional program that governs maintenance and differentiation of normal epidermis and skin appendages. The transcriptional activity of RARγ is under stringent control, in part, through retinoic acid-induced phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation (12).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Although originally identified based on their roles in calcium and bone homeostasis, the vitamin D3 receptor (VDR/NR1I1) and its ligand 1-α, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol [1α, 25(OH)2D3] are now recognized to exert biological effects in almost every tissue of the human body. Targets for vitamin D signaling include the central nervous system, skin, immune system, endocrine glands, kidney, and colon. At the cellular level, vitamin D signaling affects proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis of both normal and transformed cells. Within the steroid receptor gene family, VDR belongs to the NR1I subfamily that also includes NR1I2/PXR and NR1I3/CAR. The human VDR gene is composed of 11 exons that encode six domains (A-F) of the full length VDR protein, which includes an N-terminal dual zinc finger DNA binding domain, a C-terminal ligand-binding activity domain, and an extensive unstructured region that links the two functional domains together (1). Upon 1α, 25(OH)2D3 binding to the hormone ligand-binding domain, VDR is stabilized by the phosphorylation of Ser51 in the DNA-binding domain by PKC (2), and Ser208 in the hinge region by casein kinase II (3). VDR associates with the retinoic acid receptor (RXR) through dimerization domains. The 1α, 25(OH)2D3-VDR-RXR complex binds to the vitamin D response elements (VDREs) in the promoters of target genes through the DNA-binding domain. Ligand-induced conformation changes in VDR results in the dissociation of the co-repressor, silencing-mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT), and allows interaction of the VDR activation function (AF2) transactivation domain with transcriptional coactivators (1).Studies have shown that variable VDR expression is associated with different forms or stages of cancer and likely results from tissue-type variation in 1α, 25(OH)2D3 signaling. In the case of colon cancer, research indicates that VDR expression is relatively higher in hyperplastic colon polyps and during early tumorigenesis but diminishes in later stage, poorly differentiated tumors. Multiple studies suggest that 1α, 25(OH)2D3 may be an attractive target for development as a therapeutic anticancer agent (4,5) .

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) is a transcription factor that belongs to the steroid hormone receptor superfamily and is enriched in liver (1). HNF4α, in association with PGC-1α, activates gluconeogenic genes such as phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase genes in fasted livers (2,3). Conditional knockout of the HNF4α gene in the mouse liver destroys lipid homeostasis and leads to lipid accumulation in the liver and a reduction of serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels (4). Mutations in HNF4α have been linked to maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a member of the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily and functions as a transcriptional activator (1). PPARγ is preferentially expressed in adipocytes as well as in vascular smooth muscle cells and macrophage (2). Besides its role in mediating adipogenesis and lipid metabolism (2), PPARγ also modulates insulin sensitivity, cell proliferation and inflammation (3). PPARγ transcriptional activity is inhibited by MAP kinase phosphorylation of PPARγ at Ser84 (4,5).