Microsize antibodies for $99 | Learn More >>

Monoclonal Antibody Immunoprecipitation Anterior/Posterior Axon Guidance

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Netrin proteins belong to an evolutionarily conserved family of laminin-like molecules that are involved in axon guidance and vascular development. These secreted proteins can have opposing functions depending on specific receptor association. For example, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) family receptors typically mediate cellular attraction (1,2) while netrin bound to UNC5 family receptors induce cellular repulsion (2-4). The uncoordinated 5B homolog (UNC5B) is a transmembrane protein with extracellular Ig-like domains and an intracellular region containing a protein-binding death domain and a putative DCC interaction domain (2). Homodimers composed of DCC receptor proteins mediate axonal attraction responses, while UNC5B homodimers and UNC5B-DCC heterodimers promote cellular repulsion (2). The netrin receptor UNC5B mediates apoptosis in the absence of netrin through the activation of DAP kinase (5) and is involved in leukocyte migration inhibition (6). Expression of UNC5B correlates with bladder cancer stage and the receptor is a potential predictor of both bladder and colorectal cancer prognosis and possible disease recurrence (7,8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Paired box (PAX) proteins are a family of transcription factors that play important and diverse roles in animal development (1). Nine PAX proteins (PAX1-9) have been described in humans and other mammals. They are defined by the presence of an amino-terminal "paired" domain, consisting of two helix-turn-helix motifs, with DNA binding activity (2). PAX proteins are classified into four structurally distinct subgroups (I-IV) based on the absence or presence of a carboxy-terminal homeodomain and a central octapeptide region. Subgroup I (PAX1 and 9) contains the octapeptide but lacks the homeodomain; subgroup II (PAX2, 5, and 8) contains the octapeptide and a truncated homeodomain; subgroup III (PAX3 and 7) contains the octapeptide and a complete homeodomain; and subgroup IV (PAX4 and 6) contains a complete homeodomain but lacks the octapeptide region (2). PAX proteins play critically important roles in development by regulating transcriptional networks responsible for embryonic patterning and organogenesis (3); a subset of PAX proteins also maintain functional importance during postnatal development (4). Research studies have implicated genetic mutations that result in aberrant expression of PAX genes in a number of cancer subtypes (1-3), with members of subgroups II and III identified as potential mediators of tumor progression (2).