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Monoclonal Antibody Immunoprecipitation Antigen Processing and Presentation

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitin is a conserved polypeptide unit that plays an important role in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Ubiquitin can be covalently linked to many cellular proteins by the ubiquitination process, which targets proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome. Three components are involved in the target protein-ubiquitin conjugation process. Ubiquitin is first activated by forming a thiolester complex with the activation component E1; the activated ubiquitin is subsequently transferred to the ubiquitin-carrier protein E2, then from E2 to ubiquitin ligase E3 for final delivery to the epsilon-NH2 of the target protein lysine residue (1-3). The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has been implicated in a wide range of normal biological processes and in disease-related abnormalities. Several proteins such as IκB, p53, cdc25A, and Bcl-2 have been shown to be targets for the ubiquitin-proteasome process as part of regulation of cell cycle progression, differentiation, cell stress response, and apoptosis (4-7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: S5a (PSMD4) is a subunit of the 19S regulatory proteasome complex functioning in ubiquitinated-protein targeting and degradation (1). S5a contains two polyubiquitin binding motifs (UIM) that bind multiubiquitin chains by hydrophobic interaction (2,3). In addition to ubiquitin, the UIM of S5a shows high affinity to a ubiquitin-like domain present in many proteins. S5a binds to these types of proteins directly and mediates their targeting to the proteasome for degradation (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 26S proteasome is a highly abundant proteolytic complex involved in the degradation of ubiquitinated substrate proteins. It consists largely of two sub-complexes, the 20S catalytic core particle (CP) and the 19S/PA700 regulatory particle (RP) that can cap either end of the CP. The CP consists of two stacked heteroheptameric β-rings (β1-7) that contain three catalytic β-subunits and are flanked on either side by two heteroheptameric α-rings (α1-7). The RP includes a base and a lid, each having multiple subunits. The base, in part, is composed of a heterohexameric ring of ATPase subunits belonging to the AAA (ATPases Associated with diverse cellular Activities) family. The ATPase subunits function to unfold the substrate and open the gate formed by the α-subunits, thus exposing the unfolded substrate to the catalytic β-subunits. The lid consists of ubiquitin receptors and DUBs that function in recruitment of ubiquitinated substrates and modification of ubiquitin chain topology (1,2). Other modulators of proteasome activity, such as PA28/11S REG, can also bind to the end of the 20S CP and activate it (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 20S proteasome is the major proteolytic enzyme complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. PA700, PA28, and PA200 are three major protein complexes that function as activators of the 20S proteasome. There are three evolutionarily conserved subunits of PA28: PA28α (PSME1), PA28β (PSME2), and PA28γ (PSME3) (1,2). PA28α and PA28β form a heteroheptameric complex and function by binding to the 20S complex at its opening site(s). The PA28α/β complex is present throughout the cell and participates in MHC class I antigen presentation by promoting the generation of antigenic peptides from foreign proteins (2). PA28γ exists in the form of a homoheptamer and is mainly located in the nucleus. The PA28γ complex exerts its function by binding and guiding specific nuclear target proteins to the 20S proteasome for further degradation (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: S5a (PSMD4) is a subunit of the 19S regulatory proteasome complex functioning in ubiquitinated-protein targeting and degradation (1). S5a contains two polyubiquitin binding motifs (UIM) that bind multiubiquitin chains by hydrophobic interaction (2,3). In addition to ubiquitin, the UIM of S5a shows high affinity to a ubiquitin-like domain present in many proteins. S5a binds to these types of proteins directly and mediates their targeting to the proteasome for degradation (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Sec61 translocon is a channel complex located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane to mediate membrane protein insertion into the organelle (1). There are three components in the complex, Sec61A, Sec61B, and Sec61G (2). Sec61A is the main component of the channel on the ER membrane and directly contacts nascent synthesized polypeptide TMD (transmembrane domain) for insertion (3). Sec61G functions in stablizing the channel (3). In addition to TMD insertion, Sec61 translocon has also been shown to be involved in ER calcium leakage (4,5). Both Bip and calmodulin can inhibit this leakage by their interaction with Sec61A (6,7). Sec61B has no obvious function related to target protein ER membrane insertion, but is involved in other vesicle trafficking processes such as EGFR and Her2 trafficking from the cytosol to nucleus (8,9), Gurken trafficking from Golgi to plasma membrane (10), and copper-transporting ATPase membrane distribution (11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Sec61 translocon is a channel complex located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane to mediate membrane protein insertion into the organelle (1). There are three components in the complex, Sec61A, Sec61B, and Sec61G (2). Sec61A is the main component of the channel on the ER membrane and directly contacts nascent synthesized polypeptide TMD (transmembrane domain) for insertion (3). Sec61G functions in stablizing the channel (3). In addition to TMD insertion, Sec61 translocon has also been shown to be involved in ER calcium leakage (4,5). Both Bip and calmodulin can inhibit this leakage by their interaction with Sec61A (6,7). Sec61B has no obvious function related to target protein ER membrane insertion, but is involved in other vesicle trafficking processes such as EGFR and Her2 trafficking from the cytosol to nucleus (8,9), Gurken trafficking from Golgi to plasma membrane (10), and copper-transporting ATPase membrane distribution (11).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Integrins are α/β heterodimeric cell surface receptors that play a pivotal role in cell adhesion and migration, as well as in growth and survival (1,2). The integrin family contains at least 18 α and 8 β subunits that form 24 known integrins having distinct tissue distribution and overlapping ligand specificities (3). Integrins not only transmit signals to cells in response to the extracellular environment (outside-in signaling), but also sense intracellular cues to alter their interaction with extracellular environment (inside-out signaling) (1,2).The αVβ5 integrin is expressed in various tissues and cell types, including endothelia, epithelia and fibroblasts (4). It plays a role in matrix adhesion to VN, FN, SPARC and bone sialoprotein (5) and functions in the invasion of gliomas and metastatic carcinoma cells (6,7). αVβ5 integrin plays a major role in growth-factor-induced tumor angiogenesis, where cooperative signaling by the αVβ5 integrin and growth factors regulates endothelial cell proliferation and survival (8).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: IRAP (also known as LNPEP) was originally described as an insulin-responsive aminopeptidase found in Glut4-containing vesicles (1). It is essentially always in the same compartments as Glut4 and has identical insulin-stimulated translocation patterns as Glut4 (2). IRAP is therefore considered to be a surrogate marker for Glut4 (2). IRAP was later found to be a critical enzyme that regulates the expression and activity of several essential hormones and regulatory proteins, including the Glut4 transporter (3,4). This membrane associated, zinc-dependent cystinyl aminopeptidase acts as both a receptor for angiotensin IV as well as the enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of this essential hormone from its angiotensinogen precursor (5). IRAP catalyzes the hydrolysis of several peptide hormones, including oxytocin and vasopressin (4). Abnormal IRAP expression or activity is associated with several forms of cancer in humans, including renal and endometrial cancers (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 26S proteasome is a highly abundant proteolytic complex involved in the degradation of ubiquitinated substrate proteins. It consists largely of two sub-complexes, the 20S catalytic core particle (CP) and the 19S/PA700 regulatory particle (RP) that can cap either end of the CP. The CP consists of two stacked heteroheptameric β-rings (β1-7) that contain three catalytic β-subunits and are flanked on either side by two heteroheptameric α-rings (α1-7). The RP includes a base and a lid, each having multiple subunits. The base, in part, is composed of a heterohexameric ring of ATPase subunits belonging to the AAA (ATPases Associated with diverse cellular Activities) family. The ATPase subunits function to unfold the substrate and open the gate formed by the α-subunits, thus exposing the unfolded substrate to the catalytic β-subunits. The lid consists of ubiquitin receptors and DUBs that function in recruitment of ubiquitinated substrates and modification of ubiquitin chain topology (1,2). Other modulators of proteasome activity, such as PA28/11S REG, can also bind to the end of the 20S CP and activate it (1,2).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Langerin (CD207) is a C-type lectin receptor whose expression is restricted mainly to dendritic cells in the skin including Langerhans cells in the epidermis and langerin+/CD103+ dermal dendritic cells (1-4). Langerin is found on the cell surface and within rod-shaped organelles called Birbeck granules, and its expression is required for the formation of Birbeck granules (1,5). Langerin recognizes carbohydrate motifs on the surface of pathogens, resulting in endocytosis of the pathogen into Birbeck granules, degradation of the pathogen, and antigen presentation to T cells (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Sec61 translocon is a channel complex located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane to mediate membrane protein insertion into the organelle (1). There are three components in the complex, Sec61A, Sec61B, and Sec61G (2). Sec61A is the main component of the channel on the ER membrane and directly contacts nascent synthesized polypeptide TMD (transmembrane domain) for insertion (3). Sec61G functions in stablizing the channel (3). In addition to TMD insertion, Sec61 translocon has also been shown to be involved in ER calcium leakage (4,5). Both Bip and calmodulin can inhibit this leakage by their interaction with Sec61A (6,7). Sec61B has no obvious function related to target protein ER membrane insertion, but is involved in other vesicle trafficking processes such as EGFR and Her2 trafficking from the cytosol to nucleus (8,9), Gurken trafficking from Golgi to plasma membrane (10), and copper-transporting ATPase membrane distribution (11).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC class II) molecules are heterodimeric, transmembrane glycoproteins expressed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells, and B cells. Expression can also be induced on other cell types through interferon-γ signaling (1). Prior to being displayed on the cell membrane, MHC class II molecules are loaded with exogenous peptide antigens approximately 15-24 amino acids in length that were derived from endocytosed extracellular proteins digested in the lysosome (2). Antigen-presentation through MHC class II is required for T cell activation during the immune response to extracellular pathogens (2). In humans, the MHC class II protein complex is encoded by the human leukocyte antigen gene complex (HLA). HLAs corresponding to MHC class II are HLA-DP, HLA-DM, HLA-DOA, HLA-DOB, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DR (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Coat Protein Complex II (COPII) is composed of five cytosolic proteins: Sec23/24 complex, Sec13/31 complex, and Sar1. COPII coat is located at the ER/Golgi interface and is involved in transport of newly synthesized proteins from the ER to the Golgi apparatus (1). COPII formation is initiated through the binding of the activated G protein, Sar1, to the Sec23/24 complex, thereby forming a prebudding complex that directly binds target molecules (1-3). The prebudding complex further recruits Sec13/31 to form mature COPII coat (4,5). The Sec24 subunit of COPII coat is thought to play a critical role in cargo selection (2,6). It binds directly to cargo proteins at the ER and brings them to COPII vesicles through interaction with Sec23. There are four Sec24 isoforms in human cells: Sec24A, Sec24B, Sec24C, and Sec24D (7). In mice, mutations in Sec24B have been linked to developmental defects (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Coat Protein Complex II (COPII) is composed of five cytosolic proteins: Sec23/24 complex, Sec13/31 complex, and Sar1. COPII coat is located at the ER/Golgi interface and is involved in transport of newly synthesized proteins from the ER to the Golgi apparatus (1). COPII formation is initiated through the binding of the activated G protein, Sar1, to the Sec23/24 complex, thereby forming a prebudding complex that directly binds target molecules (1-3). The prebudding complex further recruits Sec13/31 to form mature COPII coat (4,5). The Sec24 subunit of COPII coat is thought to play a critical role in cargo selection (2,6). It binds directly to cargo proteins at the ER and brings them to COPII vesicles through interaction with Sec23. There are four Sec24 isoforms in human cells: Sec24A, Sec24B, Sec24C, and Sec24D (7). In mice, mutations in Sec24B have been linked to developmental defects (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The adhesive glycoprotein thrombospondin-1 (THBS1, TSP1) localizes to the extracellular matrix (ECM) and mediates interactions between cells and the ECM and among cells. Thrombospondin-1 is a multi-domain, glycosylated protein that interacts with a wide variety of extracellular targets, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), collagens, cell receptors, growth factors, and cytokines (1). The protein structure of THBS1 includes an amino-terminal laminin G-like domain, a von Willebrand factor-binding domain, and multiple thrombospondin (TSP) repeated sequences designated as type I, type II, or type III repeats. Each thrombospondin domain interacts with a distinct type of cell surface ligands or protein targets. The amino-terminal domain interacts with aggrecan, heparin, and integrin proteins. Type I TSP repeats interact with MMPs and CD36, while carboxy-terminal repeats bind the thrombospondin receptor CD47 (1). Through these interactions, THBS1 exerts diverse effects on different signaling pathways, such as VEGF receptor/NO signaling, TGFβ signaling, and the NF-κB pathway (2-5). Thrombospondin-1 is an important regulator of many biological processes, including cell adhesion/migration, apoptosis, angiogenesis, inflammation, vascular function, and cancer development (2-5). The activity of thrombospondin-1 is mainly regulated by extracellular proteases. The metalloproteinase ADAMTS1 cleaves thrombospondin, resulting in the release of peptides with anti-angiogenic properties. Elastase and plasmin proteases degrade the THBS1 protein and down regulate its activity (6). As THBS1 is an important protein inhibitor of angiogenesis, the development of thrombospondin-based compounds and their use in therapeutic studies may provide a beneficial approach to the treatment of cancer (7,8).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cluster of Differentiation 8 (CD8) is a disulphide-linked heterodimer consisting of the unrelated α and β subunits. Each subunit is a glycoprotein composed of a single extracellular Ig-like domain, a polypeptide linker, a transmembrane part and a short cytoplasmic tail. On T cells, CD8 is the coreceptor for the T cell receptor (TCR), and these two distinct structures recognize the Antigen–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). Specifically, the Ig-like domain of CD8α interacts with the α3-domain of the MHC class I molecule. CD8 ensures specificity of the TCR–antigen interaction, prolongs the contact between the T cell and the antigen presenting cell, and the α chain recruits the tyrosine kinase Lck, which is essential for T cell activation (1).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: FcγRIIB (CD32B) is a low affinity, IgG Fc-binding receptor expressed on B cells, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs) (1-3). It is the inhibitory Fc receptor and signals through an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) within its carboxy-terminal cytoplasmic tail (2). Binding of immune complexes to FcγRIIB results in tyrosine phosphorylation of the ITIM motif at Tyr292 and recruitment of the phosphatase SHIP, which mediates inhibitory effects on immune cell activation (2,4). In this way, FcγRIIB suppresses the effects of activating Fc-binding receptors (3). For example, mice deficient for FcγRIIB have greater T cell and DC responses following injection of immune complexes (5, 6). In addition, FcγRIIB plays a role in B cell affinity maturation (7). Signaling through FcγRIIB in the absence of signaling through the B cell receptor (BCR) is proapoptotic, while signaling through FcγRIIB and the BCR simultaneously attenuates the apoptotic signal and results in selection of B cells with higher antigen affinity (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TRAFs (TNF receptor-associated factors) are a family of multifunctional adaptor proteins that bind to surface receptors and recruit additional proteins to form multiprotein signaling complexes capable of promoting cellular responses (1-3). Members of the TRAF family share a common carboxy-terminal "TRAF domain", which mediates interactions with associated proteins; many also contain amino-terminal Zinc/RING finger motifs. The first TRAFs identified, TRAF1 and TRAF2, were found by virtue of their interactions with the cytoplasmic domain of TNF-receptor 2 (TNFRII) (4). The six known TRAFs (TRAF1-6) act as adaptor proteins for a wide range of cell surface receptors and participate in the regulation of cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and stress responses.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) are molecular motors that drive directional, microtubule-dependent intracellular transport of membrane-bound organelles and other macromolecules (e.g. proteins, nucleic acids). The intracellular transport functions of KIFs are fundamentally important for a variety of cellular functions, including mitotic and meiotic division, motility/migration, hormone and neurotransmitter release, and differentiation (1-4). Disruptions to KIF-mediated intracellular transport have been linked with a variety of pathologies, ranging from tumorigenesis to defects in higher order brain function such as learning and memory (4-6).