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Monoclonal Antibody Immunoprecipitation Negative Regulation of Muscle Atrophy

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC), also independently identified as muscle-enriched cytoplasmic protein (MYP), is a CARD domain protein that regulates apoptosis (1). The ARC protein CARD domain is highly homologous to those in other cell death regulators, including caspase-2, caspase-9, RAIDD, and Apaf-1 (2). The NOL3 gene encodes both the cytoplasmic ARC protein and a 30 kDa nucleolar protein (Nop30) that is involved in RNA splicing. ARC is encoded from isoform 2 of NOL3, while isoform 1 produced by alternative splicing encodes Nop30. Both ARC and Nop30 proteins share common amino-terminal sequences (3). Research studies show that ARC can bind to caspase-8 and caspase-2 and inhibit apoptosis through extrinsic pathways that involve the receptor proteins Fas, TNFR1, and DR3 (1). Additional research indicates that the ARC anti-apoptotic mechanism may include both intrinsic (mitochondrial) and extrinsic (death receptor) pathways (4). In addition to binding caspases, ARC can disrupt the interaction with the death domains of Fas and FADD, which inhibits death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) assembly. The CARD domain of ARC can inhibit intrinsic apoptosis through binding to the pro-apoptotic Bax protein (5). Phosphorylation of ARC at Thr149 by CK2 is required for targeting of ARC to the mitochondria (6). ARC is able to suppress necroptosis, a programmed pathway of necrosis triggered by blocking the recruitment of RIP1 to TNFR1 (7). Expression of ARC protein is predominantly seen in terminally differentiated cells under normal conditions and is markedly induced in a variety of cancers including pancreatic, colorectal, breast, lung, glioblastoma, liver, kidney, melanoma, and acute myeloid leukemia (1, 8-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CBP (CREB-binding protein) and p300 are highly conserved and functionally related transcriptional co-activators that associate with transcriptional regulators and signaling molecules, integrating multiple signal transduction pathways with the transcriptional machinery (1,2). CBP/p300 also contain histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity, allowing them to acetylate histones and other proteins (2). Phosphorylation of p300 at Ser89 by PKC represses its transciptional acitivity, and phosphorylation at the same site by AMPK disrupts the association of p300 with nuclear receptors (3,4). Ser1834 phosphorylation of p300 by Akt disrupts its association with C/EBPβ (5). Growth factors induce phosphorylation of CBP at Ser437, which is required for CBP recruitment to the transcription complex (6). CaM kinase IV phosphorylates CBP at Ser302, which is required for CBP-dependent transcriptional activation in the CNS (7). The role of acetylation of CBP/p300 is of particular interest (2,8). Acetylation of p300 at Lys1499 has been demonstrated to enhance its HAT activity and affect a wide variety of signaling events (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CBP (CREB-binding protein) and p300 are highly conserved and functionally related transcriptional co-activators that associate with transcriptional regulators and signaling molecules, integrating multiple signal transduction pathways with the transcriptional machinery (1,2). CBP/p300 also contain histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity, allowing them to acetylate histones and other proteins (2). Phosphorylation of p300 at Ser89 by PKC represses its transciptional acitivity, and phosphorylation at the same site by AMPK disrupts the association of p300 with nuclear receptors (3,4). Ser1834 phosphorylation of p300 by Akt disrupts its association with C/EBPβ (5). Growth factors induce phosphorylation of CBP at Ser437, which is required for CBP recruitment to the transcription complex (6). CaM kinase IV phosphorylates CBP at Ser302, which is required for CBP-dependent transcriptional activation in the CNS (7). The role of acetylation of CBP/p300 is of particular interest (2,8). Acetylation of p300 at Lys1499 has been demonstrated to enhance its HAT activity and affect a wide variety of signaling events (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CBP (CREB-binding protein) and p300 are highly conserved and functionally related transcriptional co-activators that associate with transcriptional regulators and signaling molecules, integrating multiple signal transduction pathways with the transcriptional machinery (1,2). CBP/p300 also contain histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity, allowing them to acetylate histones and other proteins (2). Phosphorylation of p300 at Ser89 by PKC represses its transciptional acitivity, and phosphorylation at the same site by AMPK disrupts the association of p300 with nuclear receptors (3,4). Ser1834 phosphorylation of p300 by Akt disrupts its association with C/EBPβ (5). Growth factors induce phosphorylation of CBP at Ser437, which is required for CBP recruitment to the transcription complex (6). CaM kinase IV phosphorylates CBP at Ser302, which is required for CBP-dependent transcriptional activation in the CNS (7). The role of acetylation of CBP/p300 is of particular interest (2,8). Acetylation of p300 at Lys1499 has been demonstrated to enhance its HAT activity and affect a wide variety of signaling events (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cellular FLIP (FLICE inhibitory protein) is a regulator of apoptosis that has various names, such as c-FLIP (1), Casper (2), CLARP (3), FLAME (4), I-FLICE (5), MRIT (6), CASH (7), and Usurpin (8). FLIP is expressed as two alternative splice isoforms, FLIP short (FLIPS) and FLIP long (FLIPL). FLIPS contains two death effector domains (DEDs) like those found on the death receptor adaptor protein FADD and the pro-domain of caspase-8. FLIPL shares significant homology with caspase-8 (FLICE), and contains an additional death effector domain, but FLIPL lacks the catalytic active site of the caspases and does not have protease activity. Both FLIP isoforms have been reported to interact with FADD and pro-caspase-8. The role of FLIP in apoptosis is controversial as some research studies have reported it to be anti-apoptotic, while others claim that it is pro-apoptotic. Overexpression of FLIPL can lead to caspase-8 heterodimers that produce an active protease, resulting in apoptosis. However, at physiological levels, it is thought that the binding of FLIP to the DED of FADD results in inhibition of caspase-8 processing. Reduction of FLIP by siRNA or gene targeting sensitizes cells to death receptor-mediated apoptosis. FLIP has also been implicated in the resistance of cancer cells to apoptosis and is upregulated in some cancer types including Hodgkin's lymphoma and ovarian and colon carcinomas (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cellular FLIP (FLICE inhibitory protein) is a regulator of apoptosis that has various names, such as c-FLIP (1), Casper (2), CLARP (3), FLAME (4), I-FLICE (5), MRIT (6), CASH (7), and Usurpin (8). FLIP is expressed as two alternative splice isoforms, FLIP short (FLIPS) and FLIP long (FLIPL). FLIPS contains two death effector domains (DEDs) like those found on the death receptor adaptor protein FADD and the pro-domain of caspase-8. FLIPL shares significant homology with caspase-8 (FLICE), and contains an additional death effector domain, but FLIPL lacks the catalytic active site of the caspases and does not have protease activity. Both FLIP isoforms have been reported to interact with FADD and pro-caspase-8. The role of FLIP in apoptosis is controversial as some research studies have reported it to be anti-apoptotic, while others claim that it is pro-apoptotic. Overexpression of FLIPL can lead to caspase-8 heterodimers that produce an active protease, resulting in apoptosis. However, at physiological levels, it is thought that the binding of FLIP to the DED of FADD results in inhibition of caspase-8 processing. Reduction of FLIP by siRNA or gene targeting sensitizes cells to death receptor-mediated apoptosis. FLIP has also been implicated in the resistance of cancer cells to apoptosis and is upregulated in some cancer types including Hodgkin's lymphoma and ovarian and colon carcinomas (9).