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Monoclonal Antibody Immunoprecipitation Positive Regulation of Protein Transport

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TNF-α, the prototypical member of the TNF protein superfamily, is a homotrimeric type-II membrane protein (1,2). Membrane-bound TNF-α is cleaved by the metalloprotease TACE/ADAM17 to generate a soluble homotrimer (2). Both membrane and soluble forms of TNF-α are biologically active. TNF-α is produced by a variety of immune cells including T cells, B cells, NK cells, and macrophages (1). Cellular response to TNF-α is mediated through interaction with receptors TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 and results in activation of pathways that favor both cell survival and apoptosis depending on the cell type and biological context. Activation of kinase pathways (including JNK, Erk1/2, p38 MAPK, and NF-κB) promotes the survival of cells, while TNF-α-mediated activation of caspase-8 leads to programmed cell death (1,2). TNF-α plays a key regulatory role in inflammation and host defense against bacterial infection, notably Mycobacterium tuberculosis (3).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TNF-α, the prototypical member of the TNF protein superfamily, is a homotrimeric type-II membrane protein (1,2). Membrane-bound TNF-α is cleaved by the metalloprotease TACE/ADAM17 to generate a soluble homotrimer (2). Both membrane and soluble forms of TNF-α are biologically active. TNF-α is produced by a variety of immune cells including T cells, B cells, NK cells, and macrophages (1). Cellular response to TNF-α is mediated through interaction with receptors TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 and results in activation of pathways that favor both cell survival and apoptosis depending on the cell type and biological context. Activation of kinase pathways (including JNK, Erk1/2, p38 MAPK, and NF-κB) promotes the survival of cells, while TNF-α-mediated activation of caspase-8 leads to programmed cell death (1,2). TNF-α plays a key regulatory role in inflammation and host defense against bacterial infection, notably Mycobacterium tuberculosis (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TNF-α, the prototypical member of the TNF protein superfamily, is a homotrimeric type-II membrane protein (1,2). Membrane-bound TNF-α is cleaved by the metalloprotease TACE/ADAM17 to generate a soluble homotrimer (2). Both membrane and soluble forms of TNF-α are biologically active. TNF-α is produced by a variety of immune cells including T cells, B cells, NK cells, and macrophages (1). Cellular response to TNF-α is mediated through interaction with receptors TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 and results in activation of pathways that favor both cell survival and apoptosis depending on the cell type and biological context. Activation of kinase pathways (including JNK, Erk1/2, p38 MAPK, and NF-κB) promotes the survival of cells, while TNF-α-mediated activation of caspase-8 leads to programmed cell death (1,2). TNF-α plays a key regulatory role in inflammation and host defense against bacterial infection, notably Mycobacterium tuberculosis (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: GGA3 is a member of the GGA family of proteins which also includes GGA1 and GGA2. These proteins consist of four distinct segments: a VHS domain that binds the di-leucine sorting signal DXXLL; a GAT domain that binds Arf-GTP; a hinge region that recruits clathrin; and a GAE domain that has sequence similarity to γ-adaptin and recruits a number of proteins. Arf1-GTPase recruits GGA3 to the trans-Golgi network. GGAs sort acid hydrolases to the lysosome and are involved in transporting proteins containing the DXXLL signal from the Golgi complex to the endosome (1). During apoptosis or cerebral ischemia, GGA3 is cleaved by caspase-3 at Asp313, reducing GGA3 levels and lysosomal degradation of β-secretase (BACE). The resulting elevated amount and activity of BACE plays a role in amyloid-β (Aβ) production, consistent with BACE elevation and Aβ accumulation in Alzheimer’s Disease (2).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: GGA3 is a member of the GGA family of proteins which also includes GGA1 and GGA2. These proteins consist of four distinct segments: a VHS domain that binds the di-leucine sorting signal DXXLL; a GAT domain that binds Arf-GTP; a hinge region that recruits clathrin; and a GAE domain that has sequence similarity to γ-adaptin and recruits a number of proteins. Arf1-GTPase recruits GGA3 to the trans-Golgi network. GGAs sort acid hydrolases to the lysosome and are involved in transporting proteins containing the DXXLL signal from the Golgi complex to the endosome (1). During apoptosis or cerebral ischemia, GGA3 is cleaved by caspase-3 at Asp313, reducing GGA3 levels and lysosomal degradation of β-secretase (BACE). The resulting elevated amount and activity of BACE plays a role in amyloid-β (Aβ) production, consistent with BACE elevation and Aβ accumulation in Alzheimer’s Disease (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The adducins (ADD) are cytoskeleton-associated proteins that help cap the ends of actin filaments, promote association between spectrin and actin, and participate in synapse assembly. The three closely related genes ADD1, ADD2, and ADD3 encode the α-adducin, β-adducin, and γ-adducin proteins (1). Research studies indicate that β-adducin is found at high levels in brain and hematopoietic tissues, whereas both α-adducin and γ-adducin are ubiquitously expressed (2). Adducin protein function is regulated by phosphorylation at a number of sites. Both PKA and PKC can phosphorylate α-adducin at Ser726 and β-adducin at Ser713, which inhibits calmodulin binding and adducin activity (3-5). Additionally, PKA (but not PKC) can phosphorylate β-adducin at Ser408, Ser436, and Ser481, which negatively affects spectrin-actin interactions (3). Phosphorylation of α-adducin at Thr445 and Thr480 by Rho-kinase regulates cell motility and membrane ruffling (6). Finally, CDK-1 phosphorylation of α-adducin at Ser12 and Ser355 during mitosis leads to association of α-adducin with the mitotic spindle, suggesting that α-adducin may play a role in mitotic regulation (7). Because α-adducin plays a role in regulating renal sodium reabsorption, it is not surprising that a number of studies show a relationship between ADD1 genetic polymorphisms and the development of hypertension (8-10).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Golgi apparatus functions in the modification, organization, and transport of proteins and membranes targeted to other parts of the cell, such as the plasma membrane, lysosomes, and endosomes. This regulated transport is important for appropriate protein localization, secretion, and signal transduction. Members of the Golgin family of proteins, including GM130, Giantin, p115, and GRASP65, are defined by their presence in the Golgi matrix and by their long coiled coil domains. Golgin function, which is regulated in part by small GTPases of the Rab and Arl families, includes establishing and maintaining Golgi structure and transport (reviewed in 1). The Golgi cisternae are stacked and linked laterally to form a ribbon. GRASP65 and GM130 are required for membrane fusion events that mediate ribbon formation during Golgi assembly. These lateral fusion events allow for uniform distribution of Golgi enzymes (2). GM130 and Giantin interact with the transport factor p115 to facilitate endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi transport (3). GM130 is also involved in the transport of the Ether-a-go-go-Related (hERG) potassium ion channel. Inappropriate hERG localization may be an underlying cause in Long QT syndrome, a hereditary and potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmia (4). Further, GM130 was implicated in signal transduction regulating invasion, migration, and cell polarization via its interaction with and activation of serine/threonine kinases YSK1 and Mst4 (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Rab7 and Rab9 are members of the Ras superfamily of small Rab GTPases (1). Both proteins are located in late endosomes, but exert different functions. Rab7 associates with the RIPL effector protein to control membrane trafficking from early to late endosome and to lysosomes (2,3). Rab7 also helps to regulate growth receptor endocytic trafficking and degradation (3,4), and maturation of phagosome and autophagic vacuoles (4-6). Rab9 interacts with its effector proteins p40 and TIP47 (7,8) to promote the MPR (mannose 6-phosphate receptor)-associated lysosomal enzyme transport between late endosomes and the trans Golgi network (9,10).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Several protein-protein interactions are essential to membrane fusion during endocytosis. Membrane fusion requires interaction among SNARE1 proteins associated with both donor and acceptor membranes (1,2). Following membrane fusion, the α-SNAP cytoplasmic adapter protein binds to the SNARE complex. N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), a hexameric ATPase, then associates with the α-SNAP/SNARE complex to mediate SNARE disassembly during membrane fusion (3,4). The ATPase activity of NSF induces a conformational change in the α-SNAP/SNARE complex that leads to its dissociation from the membrane, membrane fusion and eventual recycling of the SNARE complex for subsequent membrane fusion (3,4).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Rab11a, Rab11b and Rab25 are members of the Rab11 family of small Ras-like GTPases. Rab11 (isoforms Rab11a and Rab11b) functions as a key regulator in the recycling of perinuclear, plasma membrane and Golgi compartment endosomes (1,2). Despite some overlap, distinct differences exist between Rab11a and Rab11b in both their cellular distribution and functional roles. Rab11a is ubiquitously expressed while Rab11b is found mainly in the heart and brain (3,4). Like other Rab proteins, Rab11 exerts its function via interactions with Rab11 family interacting proteins (FIPs). While there are three distinct classes of FIPs, all appear to share a conserved carboxy-terminal Rab-binding domain that allows Rab-FIP protein interaction. When bound together, these proteins are thought to regulate membrane-associated protein sorting (5,6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Rab7 and Rab9 are members of the Ras superfamily of small Rab GTPases (1). Both proteins are located in late endosomes, but exert different functions. Rab7 associates with the RIPL effector protein to control membrane trafficking from early to late endosome and to lysosomes (2,3). Rab7 also helps to regulate growth receptor endocytic trafficking and degradation (3,4), and maturation of phagosome and autophagic vacuoles (4-6). Rab9 interacts with its effector proteins p40 and TIP47 (7,8) to promote the MPR (mannose 6-phosphate receptor)-associated lysosomal enzyme transport between late endosomes and the trans Golgi network (9,10).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) activates cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA or cAPK) in mammalian cells and controls many cellular mechanisms such as gene transcription, ion transport, and protein phosphorylation (1). Inactive PKA is a heterotetramer composed of a regulatory subunit (R) dimer and a catalytic subunit (C) dimer. In this inactive state, the pseudosubstrate sequences on the R subunits block the active sites on the C subunits. Three C subunit isoforms (C-α, C-β, and C-γ) and two families of regulatory subunits (RI and RII) with distinct cAMP binding properties have been identified. The two R families exist in two isoforms, α and β (RI-α, RI-β, RII-α, and RII-β). Upon binding of cAMP to the R subunits, the autoinhibitory contact is eased and active monomeric C subunits are released. PKA shares substrate specificity with Akt (PKB) and PKC, which are characterized by an arginine at position -3 relative to the phosphorylated serine or threonine residue (2). Substrates that present this consensus sequence and have been shown to be phosphorylated by PKA are Bad (Ser155), CREB (Ser133), and GSK-3 (GSK-3α Ser21 and GSK-3β Ser9) (3-5). In addition, combined knock-down of PKA C-α and -β blocks cAMP-mediated phosphorylation of Raf (Ser43 and Ser259) (6). Autophosphorylation and phosphorylation by PDK-1 are two known mechanisms responsible for phosphorylation of the C subunit at Thr197 (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). Autophagy is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation but is also associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection and cancer (3). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and is directed by a number of autophagy-related (Atg) genes. These proteins are involved in the formation of autophagosomes, cytoplasmic vacuoles that are delivered to lysosomes for degradation. The class III type phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Vps34 regulates vacuolar trafficking and autophagy (4,5). Multiple proteins associate with Vsp34, including p105/Vsp15, Beclin-1, UVRAG, Atg14, and Rubicon, to determine Vsp34 function (6-12). Atg14 and Rubicon were identified based on their ability to bind to Beclin-1 and participate in unique complexes with opposing functions (9-12). Rubicon, which localizes to the endosome and lysosome, inhibits Vps34 lipid kinase activity; knockdown of Rubicon enhances autophagy and endocytic trafficking (11,12). In contrast, Atg14 localizes to autophagosomes, isolation membranes and ER, and can enhance Vps34 activity. Knockdown of Atg14 inhibits starvation-induced autophagy (11,12).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Flotillins belong to a family of lipid raft-associated integral membrane proteins that carry an evolutionarily conserved domain called the prohibitin homology domain (PHB) (1). Flotillin members are ubiquitously expressed and located in noncaveolar microdomains (lipid rafts) on the plasma membrane where they support signal transduction and regulate lipid raft motility and localization (2-5). Two flotillin members have been described, flotillin-1 and flotillin-2. In addition to its colocalization with lipid rafts on the plasma membrane, flotillin-1 also has been found in compartments of the endocytic and autophagosomal pathways, such as recycling/late endosomes, the Golgi complex, and the nucleus (6,7). Flotillin-2 is mainly localized to the plasma membrane and is prevalent in cell-cell contact sites. However, overexpressed flotillin-2 has also been found in the late endosome (4,8,9). Both flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 are commonly used as lipid raft-associated markers.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Arrestin proteins function as negative regulators of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Cognate ligand binding stimulates GPCR phosphorylation, which is followed by binding of arrestin to the phosphorylated GPCR and the eventual internalization of the receptor and desensitization of GPCR signaling (1). Four distinct mammalian arrestin proteins are known. Arrestin 1 (also known as S-arrestin) and arrestin 4 (X-arrestin) are localized to retinal rods and cones, respectively. Arrestin 2 (also known as β-arrestin 1) and arrestin 3 (β-arrestin 2) are ubiquitously expressed and bind to most GPCRs (2). β-arrestins function as adaptor and scaffold proteins and play important roles in other processes, such as recruiting c-Src family proteins to GPCRs in Erk activation pathways (3,4). β-arrestins are also involved in some receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathways (5-8). Additional evidence suggests that β-arrestins translocate to the nucleus and help regulate transcription by binding transcriptional cofactors (9,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation

Background: Sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1, p62) is a ubiquitin binding protein involved in cell signaling, oxidative stress, and autophagy (1-4). It was first identified as a protein that binds to the SH2 domain of p56Lck (5) and independently found to interact with PKCζ (6,7). SQSTM1 was subsequently found to interact with ubiquitin, providing a scaffold for several signaling proteins and triggering degradation of proteins through the proteasome or lysosome (8). Interaction between SQSTM1 and TRAF6 leads to the K63-linked polyubiquitination of TRAF6 and subsequent activation of the NF-κB pathway (9). Protein aggregates formed by SQSTM1 can be degraded by the autophagosome (4,10,11). SQSTM1 binds autophagosomal membrane protein LC3/Atg8, bringing SQSTM1-containing protein aggregates to the autophagosome (12). Lysosomal degradation of autophagosomes leads to a decrease in SQSTM1 levels during autophagy; conversely, autophagy inhibitors stabilize SQSTM1 levels. Studies have demonstrated a link between SQSTM1 and oxidative stress. SQSTM1 interacts with KEAP1, which is a cytoplasmic inhibitor of NRF2, a key transcription factor involved in cellular responses to oxidative stress (3). Thus, accumulation of SQSTM1 can lead to an increase in NRF2 activity.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The maintenance of glucose homeostasis is an essential physiological process that is regulated by hormones. An elevation in blood glucose levels during feeding stimulates insulin release from pancreatic β cells through a glucose sensing pathway (1). Insulin is synthesized as a precursor molecule, proinsulin, which is processed prior to secretion. A- and B-peptides are joined together by a disulfide bond to form insulin, while the central portion of the precursor molecule is cleaved and released as the C-peptide. Insulin stimulates glucose uptake from blood into skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Insulin deficiency leads to type 1 diabetes mellitus (2).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), a member of the TNF receptor superfamily, is distinguished by multiple cysteine-rich ligand-binding domains, a single transmembrane sequence and a noncatalytic cytoplasmic domain (1). p75NTR displays paradoxical functions when acting alone or with other receptor proteins. Working in concert with Trk receptors, p75NTR recognizes neurotrophins and transmits trophic signals into the cell. Both p75NTR and TrkA are required to activate PI3K-Akt signaling, while TrkA can individually activate the MAP kinase pathway. In contrast, p75NTR, possibly through JNK, ensures appropriate apoptosis of injured neurons and improperly targeted neonatal neurons (2).The p75NTR protein undergoes sequential cleavage similar to APP and Notch. First, α-secretase removes the p75NTR ectodomain, eliminating ligand-mediated signaling. At this point, the membrane-tethered cleavage product can still fine-tune Trk-mediated trophic actions. γ-secretase cleaves within the transmembrane domain to liberate the cytoplasmic tail from its membrane anchor and allow the p75NTR intracellular domain to translocate to the nucleus (3,4).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Connexin 43 (Cx43) is a member of the large family of gap junction proteins. Connexins assemble as a hexamer and are transported to the plasma membrane to create a hemichannel that can associate with hemichannels on nearby cells to create cell-to-cell channels. Clusters of these channels assemble to make gap junctions. Gap junction communication is important in development and regulation of cell growth. Phosphorylation of Cx43 is important in regulating assembly and function of gap junctions (1,2). Ser368 of Cx43 is phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC) after activation by phorbol esters, which decreases cell-to-cell communication (3). Src can interact with and phosphorylate Cx43 to alter gap junction communication (4,5).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1, p62) is a ubiquitin binding protein involved in cell signaling, oxidative stress, and autophagy (1-4). It was first identified as a protein that binds to the SH2 domain of p56Lck (5) and independently found to interact with PKCζ (6,7). SQSTM1 was subsequently found to interact with ubiquitin, providing a scaffold for several signaling proteins and triggering degradation of proteins through the proteasome or lysosome (8). Interaction between SQSTM1 and TRAF6 leads to the K63-linked polyubiquitination of TRAF6 and subsequent activation of the NF-κB pathway (9). Protein aggregates formed by SQSTM1 can be degraded by the autophagosome (4,10,11). SQSTM1 binds autophagosomal membrane protein LC3/Atg8, bringing SQSTM1-containing protein aggregates to the autophagosome (12). Lysosomal degradation of autophagosomes leads to a decrease in SQSTM1 levels during autophagy; conversely, autophagy inhibitors stabilize SQSTM1 levels. Studies have demonstrated a link between SQSTM1 and oxidative stress. SQSTM1 interacts with KEAP1, which is a cytoplasmic inhibitor of NRF2, a key transcription factor involved in cellular responses to oxidative stress (3). Thus, accumulation of SQSTM1 can lead to an increase in NRF2 activity.