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Monoclonal Antibody Immunoprecipitation Protein Methyltransferase Activity

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein arginine N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is a member of the protein arginine N-methyltransferase (PRMT) family of proteins that catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to a guanidine nitrogen of arginine (1). Though all PRMT proteins catalyze the formation of mono-methyl arginine, Type I PRMTs (PRMT1, 3, 4, and 6) add an additional methyl group to produce an asymmetric di-methyl arginine while Type II PRMTs (PRMT 5 and 7) produce symmetric di-methyl arginine (1). Mono-methyl arginine, but not di-methyl arginine, can be converted to citrulline through deimination catalyzed by enzymes such as PADI4 (2). Most PRMTs, including PRMT1, methylate arginine residues found within glycine-arginine rich (GAR) protein domains, such as RGG, RG, and RXR repeats (1). However, PRMT4/CARM1 and PRMT5 methylate arginine residues within PGM (proline-, glycine-, methionine-rich) motifs (3). PRMT1 methylates Arg3 of histone H4 and cooperates synergistically with p300/CBP to enhance transcriptional activation by nuclear receptor proteins (4-6). In addition, PRMT1 methylates many non-histone proteins, including the orphan nuclear receptor HNF4 (6), components of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) particle (7), the RNA binding protein Sam68 (8), interleukin enhancer-binding factor 3 (ILF3) (9) and interferon-α and β receptors (10). These interactions suggest additional functions in transcriptional regulation, mRNA processing and signal transduction. Alternative mRNA splicing produces three enzymatically active PRMT1 isoforms that differ in their amino-terminal regions (11). PRMT1 is localized to the nucleus or cytoplasm, depending on cell type (12,13), and appears in many distinct protein complexes. ILF3, TIS21 and the leukemia-associated BTG1 proteins bind PRMT1 to regulate its methyltransferase activity (9,14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein arginine N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is a member of the protein arginine N-methyltransferase (PRMT) family of proteins that catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to a guanidine nitrogen of arginine (1). Though all PRMT proteins catalyze the formation of mono-methyl arginine, Type I PRMTs (PRMT1, 3, 4, and 6) add an additional methyl group to produce an asymmetric di-methyl arginine while Type II PRMTs (PRMT 5 and 7) produce symmetric di-methyl arginine (1). Mono-methyl arginine, but not di-methyl arginine, can be converted to citrulline through deimination catalyzed by enzymes such as PADI4 (2). Most PRMTs, including PRMT1, methylate arginine residues found within glycine-arginine rich (GAR) protein domains, such as RGG, RG, and RXR repeats (1). However, PRMT4/CARM1 and PRMT5 methylate arginine residues within PGM (proline-, glycine-, methionine-rich) motifs (3). PRMT1 methylates Arg3 of histone H4 and cooperates synergistically with p300/CBP to enhance transcriptional activation by nuclear receptor proteins (4-6). In addition, PRMT1 methylates many non-histone proteins, including the orphan nuclear receptor HNF4 (6), components of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) particle (7), the RNA binding protein Sam68 (8), interleukin enhancer-binding factor 3 (ILF3) (9) and interferon-α and β receptors (10). These interactions suggest additional functions in transcriptional regulation, mRNA processing and signal transduction. Alternative mRNA splicing produces three enzymatically active PRMT1 isoforms that differ in their amino-terminal regions (11). PRMT1 is localized to the nucleus or cytoplasm, depending on cell type (12,13), and appears in many distinct protein complexes. ILF3, TIS21 and the leukemia-associated BTG1 proteins bind PRMT1 to regulate its methyltransferase activity (9,14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Set1 histone methyltransferase protein was first identified in yeast as part of the Set1/COMPASS histone methyltransferase complex, which methylates histone H3 at Lys4 and functions as a transcriptional co-activator (1). While yeast contain only one known Set1 protein, six Set1-related proteins exist in mammals: SET1A, SET1B, MLL1, MLL2, MLL3, and MLL4, all of which assemble into COMPASS-like complexes and methylate histone H3 at Lys4 (2,3). These Set1-related proteins are each found in distinct protein complexes, all of which share the common subunits WDR5, RBBP5, ASH2L, CXXC1 and DPY30. These subunits are required for proper complex assembly and modulation of histone methyltransferase activity (2-6). MLL1 and MLL2 complexes contain the additional protein subunit, menin (6). Like yeast Set1, all six Set1-related mammalian proteins methylate histone H3 at Lys4 (2-6). MLL translocations are found in a large number of hematological malignancies, suggesting that Set1/COMPASS histone methyltransferase complexes play a critical role in leukemogenesis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Set1 histone methyltransferase protein was first identified in yeast as part of the Set1/COMPASS histone methyltransferase complex, which methylates histone H3 at Lys4 and functions as a transcriptional co-activator (1). While yeast contain only one known Set1 protein, six Set1-related proteins exist in mammals: SET1A, SET1B, MLL1, MLL2, MLL3, and MLL4, all of which assemble into COMPASS-like complexes and methylate histone H3 at Lys4 (2,3). These Set1-related proteins are each found in distinct protein complexes, all of which share the common subunits WDR5, RBBP5, ASH2L, CXXC1 and DPY30. These subunits are required for proper complex assembly and modulation of histone methyltransferase activity (2-6). MLL1 and MLL2 complexes contain the additional protein subunit, menin (6). Like yeast Set1, all six Set1-related mammalian proteins methylate histone H3 at Lys4 (2-6). MLL translocations are found in a large number of hematological malignancies, suggesting that Set1/COMPASS histone methyltransferase complexes play a critical role in leukemogenesis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DOT1-like protein (DOT1L), also known as Lysine N-methyltransferase 4 (KMT4), is a histone methyltransferase that functions to mono-, di-, and tri-methylate histone H3 on lysine 79, a histone modification that is associated with active transcription and plays a role in DNA damage response, cell cycle regulation, and embryonic stem cell development (1). DOT1L is required for the initiation and maintenance of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-rearranged leukemias, and selective DOT1L inhibitors such as EP2-5676 show remarkable anti-tumor effects in MLL-rearranged leukemias (2,3). Multiple studies have also implicated DOT1L in solid tumor cancers such as breast cancer, where DOT1L induces neoplastic transformation of immortalized breast cancer cells and promotes tumor initiation and growth. Overexpression of DOT1L is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer, and selective DOT1L inhibitors are able to suppress proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells (4-6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DOT1-like protein (DOT1L), also known as Lysine N-methyltransferase 4 (KMT4), is a histone methyltransferase that functions to mono-, di-, and tri-methylate histone H3 on lysine 79, a histone modification that is associated with active transcription and plays a role in DNA damage response, cell cycle regulation, and embryonic stem cell development (1). DOT1L is required for the initiation and maintenance of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-rearranged leukemias, and selective DOT1L inhibitors such as EP2-5676 show remarkable anti-tumor effects in MLL-rearranged leukemias (2,3). Multiple studies have also implicated DOT1L in solid tumor cancers such as breast cancer, where DOT1L induces neoplastic transformation of immortalized breast cancer cells and promotes tumor initiation and growth. Overexpression of DOT1L is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer, and selective DOT1L inhibitors are able to suppress proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells (4-6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Erg-associated protein with SET domain (ESET), also known as SET-domain, bifurcated 1 (SETDB1) protein, is a member of a family of histone lysine methyltransferases, each of which contains a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in Drosophila Su[var]3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins (1). ESET also contains tudor and methyl-CpG-binding domains, which may coordinate binding to methylated histones and methylated DNA, respectively (1). ESET methylates histone H3 Lys9, creating a transcriptionally repressive mark that facilitates gene silencing (1-3). However, unlike SUV39H histone H3 Lys9 methyltransferases, which function mainly in heterochromatin regions such as pericentric heterochromatin, ESET functions mainly in euchromatic regions to repress gene promoters (3). ESET interacts with a variety of proteins, including transcription factors (ERG), histone deacetylases (HDAC1/2), DNA methyltransferases (DNMT3A/B) and transcriptional co-repressors (mSin3A/B, MBD1, KAP-1, the ATFa-associated modulator mAM) (1-6). mAM forms a complex with ESET, stimulating its methyltransferase activity, specifically the conversion of di-methyl to tri-methyl histone H3 Lys9 (2). MBD1 recruits ESET to the CAF-1 complex to facilitate methylation of histone H3 Lys9 during replication-coupled chromatin assembly in S phase (5). DNMT3A recruits ESET to silenced promoters in cancer cells (7). ESET may play a role in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease, since levels of ESET protein and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys9 are both increased in diseased brains (8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Erg-associated protein with SET domain (ESET), also known as SET-domain, bifurcated 1 (SETDB1) protein, is a member of a family of histone lysine methyltransferases, each of which contains a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in Drosophila Su[var]3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins (1). ESET also contains tudor and methyl-CpG-binding domains, which may coordinate binding to methylated histones and methylated DNA, respectively (1). ESET methylates histone H3 Lys9, creating a transcriptionally repressive mark that facilitates gene silencing (1-3). However, unlike SUV39H histone H3 Lys9 methyltransferases, which function mainly in heterochromatin regions such as pericentric heterochromatin, ESET functions mainly in euchromatic regions to repress gene promoters (3). ESET interacts with a variety of proteins, including transcription factors (ERG), histone deacetylases (HDAC1/2), DNA methyltransferases (DNMT3A/B) and transcriptional co-repressors (mSin3A/B, MBD1, KAP-1, the ATFa-associated modulator mAM) (1-6). mAM forms a complex with ESET, stimulating its methyltransferase activity, specifically the conversion of di-methyl to tri-methyl histone H3 Lys9 (2). MBD1 recruits ESET to the CAF-1 complex to facilitate methylation of histone H3 Lys9 during replication-coupled chromatin assembly in S phase (5). DNMT3A recruits ESET to silenced promoters in cancer cells (7). ESET may play a role in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease, since levels of ESET protein and tri-methyl histone H3 Lys9 are both increased in diseased brains (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: MGMT (O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase) is a DNA repair enzyme that participates in a suicide reaction that specifically removes methyl or alkyl groups from the O(6) position of guanine, restoring guanine to its normal form without causing DNA breaks (1). MGMT protects cells from alkylating toxins, and is an important factor in drug resistance to alkylating therapeutic agents (2,3). It is ubiquitously expressed in normal human tissues (4) and is overexpressed in many types of human tumors, but epigenetically silenced in other tumors. MGMT silencing is a marker associated with poor prognosis, but is a good predictive marker for response to alkylating agent chemotherapy (5).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: MGMT (O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase) is a DNA repair enzyme that participates in a suicide reaction that specifically removes methyl or alkyl groups from the O(6) position of guanine, restoring guanine to its normal form without causing DNA breaks (1). MGMT protects cells from alkylating toxins, and is an important factor in drug resistance to alkylating therapeutic agents (2,3). It is ubiquitously expressed in normal human tissues (4) and is overexpressed in many types of human tumors, but epigenetically silenced in other tumors. MGMT silencing is a marker associated with poor prognosis, but is a good predictive marker for response to alkylating agent chemotherapy (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Human histone methyltransferase SUV39H1 is the homolog of the dominant Drosophila PEV modifier Su(var)3-9 and is composed of 412 amino acid residues (1). It combines two of the most evolutionarily conserved domains of the "chromatin regulators": the chromo and SET domains (2,3). The 60 amino acid chromo domain represents an ancient histone-like fold that directs heterochromatic localizations. It has been demonstrated that the 130 amino acid SET domain contains the methyltransferase catalytic motif, which cooperates with the adjacent cysteine-rich regions to confer histone methyltransferase activity (1). This enzyme selectively methylates histone H3 on Lys9, which generates a binding site for HP1 proteins, a family of heterochromatic adaptor molecules involved in both gene silencing and supra-nucleosomal chromatin structure (4,5). SUV39H1 histone methyltransferase plays an important role in modification of histone amino termini and regulation of gene expression.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is an intracellular enzyme that catalyzes the O-methylation and inactivation of catecholamine neurotransmitters and hormones, including dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine (1). Two distinct COMT proteins are generated from separate promoters in cells, including a 28 kDa, membrane-bound protein (mb-COMT), and a soluble protein (s-COMT) of 24 kDa (2,3). The soluble s-COMT is the predominant form of COMT found in peripheral organs, while the mb-COMT protein is more abundant in the central nervous system (4,5).In addition to inactivating endogenous catecholamines, COMT can also inhibit catechol-based drugs used to treat a number of disorders, including Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia. Research studies using COMT inhibitors indicate that these reagents can prolong the bioavailability of psychoactive drugs such as levodopa by preventing O-methylation and subsequent degradation (6). A Val158Met polymorphism in the corresponding COMT gene reduces COMT enzymatic activity and leads to increased cortical dopamine levels (7). Several research studies suggest that this reduced COMT activity is associated with a large number of mental disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and anorexia nervosa (reviewed in 8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Euchromatic histone-lysine N-methyltransferase 1 (EHMT1), also referred to as G9a-like protein 1 (GLP), is a histone methyltransferase that specifically mono- and dimethylates lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me1 and H3K9me2, respectively) in euchromatin. EHMT1 is a member of a family of histone lysine methyltransferases that contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in Drosophila Su(var)3-9, enhancer of zeste and trithorax proteins (1). Although EHMT1 can homodimerize in vitro, it is typically found as a heterodimer in vivo with its paralog G9a, also known as EHMT2; together these proteins function as the major euchromatic histone H3 Lys9 mono- and dimethyltransferase, creating transcriptionally repressive marks that facilitate gene silencing (2,3). The EHMT1/G9a complex also contains Wiz, a zinc finger protein that is required for EHMT1/G9a heterodimerization and complex stability (4). Wiz contains two CtBP co-repressor binding sites, which mediate the association of EHMT1/G9a with the CtBP co-repressor complex (4). In addition, EHMT1 and G9a are components of other large transcriptional co-repressor complexes, such as those involving E2F6 and CDP/cut (5-7). EHMT1/G9a methylates several non-histone substrates, including DNMT1, CEBP/β, HDAC1 (8), and p53, specifically at lysine 373 (9). p53 Lys373 methylation was initially reported to inhibit p53 activity, suggesting that EHMT1/G9a inhibitors could help treat p53-positive cancers (9). However, a more recent study found that human G9a activated p53 and that elevated G9a-p53 expression was associated with increased survival in lung cancer patients, suggesting that further studies are required to better understand the biological significance of this methylation event (10). Lastly, defects in EHMT1 are the cause of chromosome 9q subtelomeric deletion syndrome (9q-syndrome), also known as Kleefstra syndrome (KS). Common features of KS patients are moderate to severe intellectual disability, autism, epileptic seizures, microcephaly, and dysmorphic features (11).