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Monoclonal Antibody Immunoprecipitation Regulation of Blood Coagulation

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PAR2 (F2RL1) belongs to the PAR (Protease-activated Receptor) family of G protein-coupled receptors. These membrane receptors are activated through N-terminal cleavage of the receptor by a serine protease such as thrombin, trypsin, or matrix metalloproteinases (1,2). This cleavage exposes the ‘tethered-ligand’ fragment of the receptor, which binds to a second extracellular loop of the receptor and leads to receptor activation. PAR2 is specifically activated by trypsin or trypsin-like proteases. Activated PAR2 stimulates phosphoinositide hydrolysis and calcium mobilization, interacts with β-arrestin, and eventually leads to ERK activation (3). PAR2 expression and activation are mainly associated with inflammatory diseases (3), but may also play a role in cancer development (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The adhesive glycoprotein thrombospondin-1 (THBS1, TSP1) localizes to the extracellular matrix (ECM) and mediates interactions between cells and the ECM and among cells. Thrombospondin-1 is a multi-domain, glycosylated protein that interacts with a wide variety of extracellular targets, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), collagens, cell receptors, growth factors, and cytokines (1). The protein structure of THBS1 includes an amino-terminal laminin G-like domain, a von Willebrand factor-binding domain, and multiple thrombospondin (TSP) repeated sequences designated as type I, type II, or type III repeats. Each thrombospondin domain interacts with a distinct type of cell surface ligands or protein targets. The amino-terminal domain interacts with aggrecan, heparin, and integrin proteins. Type I TSP repeats interact with MMPs and CD36, while carboxy-terminal repeats bind the thrombospondin receptor CD47 (1). Through these interactions, THBS1 exerts diverse effects on different signaling pathways, such as VEGF receptor/NO signaling, TGFβ signaling, and the NF-κB pathway (2-5). Thrombospondin-1 is an important regulator of many biological processes, including cell adhesion/migration, apoptosis, angiogenesis, inflammation, vascular function, and cancer development (2-5). The activity of thrombospondin-1 is mainly regulated by extracellular proteases. The metalloproteinase ADAMTS1 cleaves thrombospondin, resulting in the release of peptides with anti-angiogenic properties. Elastase and plasmin proteases degrade the THBS1 protein and down regulate its activity (6). As THBS1 is an important protein inhibitor of angiogenesis, the development of thrombospondin-based compounds and their use in therapeutic studies may provide a beneficial approach to the treatment of cancer (7,8).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CD141/Thrombomodulin (TM, THBD, BDCA-3) is an integral membrane protein expressed on the surface of endothelial cells (1). Acting as a cofactor with Thrombin, CD141/Thrombomodulin activates and initiates the Protein C anticoagulant pathway (1-2). CD141/Thrombomodulin is expressed by a small subset of human CD11c+ myeloid dendritic cells (3-4). These CD141+XCR1+ dendritic cells cross-present antigens to naïve CD8+ T cells, priming them to become activated cytotoxic CD8+ T cells (3-5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Vav proteins belong to the Dbl family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho/Rac small GTPases. The three identified mammalian Vav proteins (Vav1, Vav2 and Vav3) differ in their expression. Vav1 is expressed only in hematopoietic cells and is involved in the formation of the immune synapse. Vav2 and Vav3 are more ubiquitously expressed. Vav proteins contain the Dbl homology domain, which confers GEF activity, as well as protein interaction domains that allow them to function in pathways regulating actin cytoskeleton organization (reviewed in 1). Phosphorylation stimulates the GEF activity of Vav protein towards Rho/Rac (2,3).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Dog, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 21-24 kDa integral proteins, caveolins, are the principal structural components of the cholesterol/sphingolipid-enriched plasma membrane microdomain caveolae. Three members of the caveolin family (caveolin-1, -2, and -3) have been identified with different tissue distributions. Caveolins form hetero- and homo-oligomers that interact with cholesterol and other lipids (1). Caveolins are involved in diverse biological functions, including vesicular trafficking, cholesterol homeostasis, cell adhesion, and apoptosis, and are also implicated in neurodegenerative disease (2). Caveolins interact with multiple signaling molecules such as Gα subunit, tyrosine kinase receptors, PKCs, Src family tyrosine kinases, and eNOS (1,2). It is believed that caveolins serve as scaffolding proteins for the integration of signal transduction. Phosphorylation at Tyr14 is essential for caveolin association with SH2 or PTB domain-containing adaptor proteins such as GRB7 (3-5). Phosphorylation at Ser80 regulates caveolin binding to the ER membrane and entry into the secretory pathway (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apolipoproteins are plasma lipoproteins that function as transporters of lipids and cholesterol in the circulatory system. Chylomicrons are a fundamental class of apolipoproteins containing very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), intermediate-density lipoproteins (IDL), low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) (1,2).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Forkhead box protein A2 (FoxA2, also known as hepatocyte nuclear factor 3β or HNF3β) is a transcription factor that plays an important role in hepatocyte function (1). FoxA2/HNF3β is required for the activation of hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression during fasting (1). Together with the PGC-1β coactivator, FoxA2/HNF3β stimulates the expression of genes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation and therefore increases fatty acid metabolism (2). FoxA2/HNF3β, along with PGC-1β, also activates the expression of microsomal triacylglycerol transfer protein (MTP) and promotes VLDL secretion (2). In addition to its roles in metabolic syndromes, FoxA2/HNF3β is essential for development of the endoderm and midline structures in mouse embryos (3-5).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The nuclear factor-like 2 (NRF2) transcriptional activator binds antioxidant response elements (ARE) of target gene promoter regions to regulate expression of oxidative stress response genes. Under basal conditions, the NRF2 inhibitor INrf2 (also called KEAP1) binds and retains NRF2 in the cytoplasm where it can be targeted for ubiquitin-mediated degradation (1). Small amounts of constitutive nuclear NRF2 maintain cellular homeostasis through regulation of basal expression of antioxidant response genes. Following oxidative or electrophilic stress, KEAP1 releases NRF2, thereby allowing the activator to translocate to the nucleus and bind to ARE-containing genes (2). The coordinated action of NRF2 and other transcription factors mediates the response to oxidative stress (3). Altered expression of NRF2 is associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (4). NRF2 activity in lung cancer cell lines directly correlates with cell proliferation rates, and inhibition of NRF2 expression by siRNA enhances anti-cancer drug-induced apoptosis (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: S100A8 and S100A9 are calcium-binding proteins that form a noncovalent heterodimer present in monocytes, neutrophils, macrophages, and some epithelial cells (1, 2). S100A8 and S100A9 are secreted by a tubulin-dependent mechanism during inflammatory conditions and have antimicrobial and chemotactic functions (3-5). Extracellular S100A8/S100A9 also induces an inflammatory response in endothelial cells, including induction of proinflammatory chemokines and adhesion molecules and increased vascular permeability (6). S100A8/S100A9 induces and recruits myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in tumor-bearing mice (7). MDSC produce additional S100A8/S100A9 themselves, resulting in a positive feedback mechanism that sustains MDSC accumulation (7). S100A8/S100A9 is also highly expressed in psoriatic skin, where it directly upregulates transcription of complement protein C3, which contributes to disease (8). In addition, tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells induce expression of S100A8 and S100A9 in cancer cells, which increases invasiveness and metastasis (9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, which includes Src, Lyn, Fyn, Yes, Lck, Blk, and Hck, are important in the regulation of growth and differentiation of eukaryotic cells (1). Src activity is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation at two sites, but with opposing effects. While phosphorylation at Tyr416 in the activation loop of the kinase domain upregulates enzyme activity, phosphorylation at Tyr527 in the carboxy-terminal tail by Csk renders the enzyme less active (2).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, which includes Src, Lyn, Fyn, Yes, Lck, Blk, and Hck, are important in the regulation of growth and differentiation of eukaryotic cells (1). Src activity is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation at two sites, but with opposing effects. While phosphorylation at Tyr416 in the activation loop of the kinase domain upregulates enzyme activity, phosphorylation at Tyr527 in the carboxy-terminal tail by Csk renders the enzyme less active (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Eg5 (also called kinesin-like protein 11 or Kif11) belongs to the kinesin-like family of motor proteins important in chromosome positioning, centrosome separation, and mitotic spindle formation. Phosphorylation of Eg5 by mitotic kinases regulates its activity by modulating its association with microtubules (1,2). Because anti-mitotic chemotherapeutic drugs, such as taxanes, target microtubules and have pleiotropic and sometimes toxic effects, drugs that target microtubule-associated proteins such as Eg5 are currently in development (3-5).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Integrins are α/β heterodimeric cell surface receptors that play a pivotal role in cell adhesion and migration, as well as in growth and survival (1,2). The integrin family contains at least 18 α and 8 β subunits that form 24 known integrins with distinct tissue distribution and overlapping ligand specificities (3). Integrins not only transmit signals to cells in response to the extracellular environment (outside-in signaling), but also sense intracellular cues to alter their interaction with the extracellular environment (inside-out signaling) (1,2).A pair of important α4 integrins, α4β1 and α4β7, interact with VCAM-1, fibronectin, and MAdCAM-1 at cell adhesions (3). Gene knockout and antibody blocking research reveal that α4 integrins play important roles in embryonic liver and heart development and in fetal lymphocyte homing (4-6). Phosphorylation at Ser988 within the cytoplasmic tail of integrin α4 blocks binding to paxillin and promotes leading edge migration (7,8).On SDS-PAGE, integrin α4 can migrate at several different apparent molecular sizes, a 150 kDa mature protein and a 140 kDa precursor protein (a 180 kDa protein also exists under mild non-reducing conditions) (9). Integrin α4 has a cleavage site at Arg558, which results in a small portion of the protein as either an 80 kDa N-terminal or 70 kDa C-terminal fragment (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CXADR, CAR) is a highly conserved, single-transmembrane glycoprotein and the primary receptor to mediate cellular attachment and infection of coxsackie B viruses and most adenoviruses (1,2). The CAR protein contains a pair of Ig-like domains within the amino-terminal extracellular domain and a carboxyl-terminal PDZ motif (1). Research studies indicate that CAR is a tight junction protein that associates with the ZO-1 scaffold protein and promotes both cell adhesion and restriction of solute and ion movement between cells (2). Endogenous CAR is targeted to the basolateral plasma membrane by a tyrosine-based basolateral sorting signal and clathrin adaptors AP-1A and AP-1B (3). CAR binds junctional adhesion molecule L (JAML) on epithelial cells and neutrophils where it activates PI3K and downstream MAPK kinases to stimulate epithelial γδ T cell proliferation and increase production of TNFα and keratinocyte growth factor (4-6). As a result, the CAR protein plays a potentially critical role in adenoviral gene therapy, immunity, wound repair, inflammation, and cancer therapy (4-6). Additional studies demonstrate that CAR is essential in regulating squamous carcinoma cell growth (7).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Type 1 collagen is the most abundant collagen in many human tissues, including bone, skin, and tendons. It is a trimeric complex comprised of two molecules of COL1A1 (alpha-1 type 1 collagen) and one molecule of COL1A2 (alpha-2 type 1 collagen) (1-3). The expression levels of COL1A1 are regulated by multiple mechanisms, including mRNA stability, translation, and posttranslational modification (3-5). Overexpression of COL1A1 has been positively associated with tissue fibrosis disorders, including systemic sclerosis (6), while loss-of-function mutations in the COL1A1 gene are a major causative factor for osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bone disease) (7). Notably, COL1A1 expression levels have also been associated with tumor development in gastric, lung, thyroid, and breast cancers. Research studies suggest that upregulation of COL1A1 can generate a modified extracellular matrix environment that promotes cancer cell survival, proliferation, metastasis, and invasion (8-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Type 1 collagen is the most abundant collagen in many human tissues, including bone, skin, and tendons. It is a trimeric complex comprised of two molecules of COL1A1 (alpha-1 type 1 collagen) and one molecule of COL1A2 (alpha-2 type 1 collagen) (1-3). The expression levels of COL1A1 are regulated by multiple mechanisms, including mRNA stability, translation, and posttranslational modification (3-5). Overexpression of COL1A1 has been positively associated with tissue fibrosis disorders, including systemic sclerosis (6), while loss-of-function mutations in the COL1A1 gene are a major causative factor for osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bone disease) (7). Notably, COL1A1 expression levels have also been associated with tumor development in gastric, lung, thyroid, and breast cancers. Research studies suggest that upregulation of COL1A1 can generate a modified extracellular matrix environment that promotes cancer cell survival, proliferation, metastasis, and invasion (8-11).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CD44 is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates cell-cell and cell-matrix interaction through its affinity for hyaluronic acid (HA) and possibly through other parts of the extracellular matrix (ECM). CD44 is highly polymorphic, possesses a number of alternative splice variants and undergoes extensive post-translational modifications (1,2). Increased surface levels of CD44 are characteristic of T cell activation, and expression of the protein is upregulated during the inflammatory response. Research studies have shown that interactions between CD44 and HER2 are linked to an increase in ovarian carcinoma cell growth (1-3). CD44 interacts with ezrin, radixin and moesin (ERM), linking the actin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane and the ECM (4-6). CD44 is constitutively phosphorylated at Ser325 in resting cells. Activation of PKC results in phosphorylation of Ser291, dephosphorylation of Ser325, disassociation of ezrin from CD44, and directional motility (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DOCK180 and its partner, ELMO1, interact directly with one another to form an atypical two-part guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for the small GTPase Rac (1). Rac activation occurs in association with p130 Cas and Crk, which form a complex with DOCK180 that is targeted to focal adhesions (2,3). DOCK180 is also recruited to the plasma membrane by binding to phosphoinositides (4). ELMO1 may function as an inhibitor of proteasome-dependent degradation of DOCK180 at the plasma membrane to regulate reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton (5). Localized Rac activation allows actin nucleation via WAVE family proteins, signaling to integrins, formation of lamellipodia and filopodia, and regulation of processes such as phagocytosis and cell migration (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CD44 is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates cell-cell and cell-matrix interaction through its affinity for hyaluronic acid (HA) and possibly through other parts of the extracellular matrix (ECM). CD44 is highly polymorphic, possesses a number of alternative splice variants and undergoes extensive post-translational modifications (1,2). Increased surface levels of CD44 are characteristic of T cell activation, and expression of the protein is upregulated during the inflammatory response. Research studies have shown that interactions between CD44 and HER2 are linked to an increase in ovarian carcinoma cell growth (1-3). CD44 interacts with ezrin, radixin and moesin (ERM), linking the actin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane and the ECM (4-6). CD44 is constitutively phosphorylated at Ser325 in resting cells. Activation of PKC results in phosphorylation of Ser291, dephosphorylation of Ser325, disassociation of ezrin from CD44, and directional motility (4).