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Monoclonal Antibody Immunoprecipitation Rrna Processing

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CHD7 belongs to the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding (CHD) family of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling proteins (1). The CHD family of proteins has been shown to play an important role in regulating gene expression by altering the chromatin structure at target genes (1,2). The nine members of the CHD family are characterized by the presence of two tandem chromodomains in the N-terminal region and an SNF2-like ATPase domain near the central region of the protein (2-4). The CHD proteins can be further divided into three subgroups based on the presence of additional conserved functional domains. CHD7 belongs to the third subgroup of CHD proteins together with CHD6, 8, and 9, which are distinguished by the presence of three conserved region (CR) domains, a switching-defective protein 3, adaptor 2, nuclear receptor co-repressor, transcription factor IIB (SANT) like domain, two brahma and kismet (BRK) domains, and a DNA binding domain (2). CHD7 regulates embryonic stem cell (ESC) specific gene expression together with ESC master regulators Oct-4, Sox2 and nanog, and is necessary for neural stem cell development and formation of the neural crest (5-7). Research studies have shown that CHD7 mutations are frequently found in patients with CHARGE syndrome (coloboma of the eye, heart defects, atresia of the choanae, retardation of growth/development, genital/urinary abnormalities, and ear abnormalities and deafness) (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT1, the mammalian ortholog of Sir2, is a nuclear protein implicated in the regulation of many cellular processes, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, endocrine signaling, glucose homeostasis, aging, and longevity. Targets of SirT1 include acetylated p53 (2,3), p300 (4), Ku70 (5), forkhead (FoxO) transcription factors (5,6), PPARγ (7), and the PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) protein (8). Deacetylation of p53 and FoxO transcription factors represses apoptosis and increases cell survival (2,3,5,6). Deacetylation of PPARγ and PGC-1α regulates the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathways in the liver and fat mobilization in white adipocytes in response to fasting (7,8). SirT1 deacetylase activity is inhibited by nicotinamide and activated by resveratrol. In addition, SirT1 activity may be regulated by phosphorylation, as it is phosphorylated at Ser27 and Ser47 in vivo; however, the function of these phosphorylation sites has not yet been determined (9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Human histone methyltransferase SUV39H1 is the homolog of the dominant Drosophila PEV modifier Su(var)3-9 and is composed of 412 amino acid residues (1). It combines two of the most evolutionarily conserved domains of the "chromatin regulators": the chromo and SET domains (2,3). The 60 amino acid chromo domain represents an ancient histone-like fold that directs heterochromatic localizations. It has been demonstrated that the 130 amino acid SET domain contains the methyltransferase catalytic motif, which cooperates with the adjacent cysteine-rich regions to confer histone methyltransferase activity (1). This enzyme selectively methylates histone H3 on Lys9, which generates a binding site for HP1 proteins, a family of heterochromatic adaptor molecules involved in both gene silencing and supra-nucleosomal chromatin structure (4,5). SUV39H1 histone methyltransferase plays an important role in modification of histone amino termini and regulation of gene expression.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the INK4 family of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors include p16INK4A, p15INK4B, p18INK4C and p19INK4D. The INK4 family members inhibit cyclin dependent kinases 4 and 6 (CDK4 and CDK6), causing cell cycle arrest in G1 phase. The INK4A-ARF-INK4B locus on chromosome 9p21, frequently lost in human cancer, encodes the INK4 family members p16INK5A and p15INK4B, as well as the unrelated protein, ARF (1).p16 INK4A expression, typically repressed in the absence of stress, is thought to drive cells into senescence, and p16 INK4A expression is a commonly used marker of senescent cells (2). p16INK4A protein expression is often altered in human cancer (3,4), and high expression is currently used as a predictive biomarker in cervical cancer (5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT1, the mammalian ortholog of Sir2, is a nuclear protein implicated in the regulation of many cellular processes, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, endocrine signaling, glucose homeostasis, aging, and longevity. Targets of SirT1 include acetylated p53 (2,3), p300 (4), Ku70 (5), forkhead (FoxO) transcription factors (5,6), PPARγ (7), and the PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) protein (8). Deacetylation of p53 and FoxO transcription factors represses apoptosis and increases cell survival (2,3,5,6). Deacetylation of PPARγ and PGC-1α regulates the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathways in the liver and fat mobilization in white adipocytes in response to fasting (7,8). SirT1 deacetylase activity is inhibited by nicotinamide and activated by resveratrol. In addition, SirT1 activity may be regulated by phosphorylation, as it is phosphorylated at Ser27 and Ser47 in vivo; however, the function of these phosphorylation sites has not yet been determined (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Silent Information Regulator (SIR2) family of genes is a highly conserved group of genes that encode nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent protein deacetylases, also known as class III histone deacetylases. The first discovered and best characterized of these genes is Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2, which is involved in silencing of mating type loci, telomere maintenance, DNA damage response, and cell aging (1). SirT1, the mammalian ortholog of Sir2, is a nuclear protein implicated in the regulation of many cellular processes, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, endocrine signaling, glucose homeostasis, aging, and longevity. Targets of SirT1 include acetylated p53 (2,3), p300 (4), Ku70 (5), forkhead (FoxO) transcription factors (5,6), PPARγ (7), and the PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) protein (8). Deacetylation of p53 and FoxO transcription factors represses apoptosis and increases cell survival (2,3,5,6). Deacetylation of PPARγ and PGC-1α regulates the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathways in the liver and fat mobilization in white adipocytes in response to fasting (7,8). SirT1 deacetylase activity is inhibited by nicotinamide and activated by resveratrol. In addition, SirT1 activity may be regulated by phosphorylation, as it is phosphorylated at Ser27 and Ser47 in vivo; however, the function of these phosphorylation sites has not yet been determined (9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the INK4 family of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors include p16INK4A, p15INK4B, p18INK4C and p19INK4D. The INK4 family members inhibit cyclin dependent kinases 4 and 6 (CDK4 and CDK6), causing cell cycle arrest in G1 phase. The INK4A-ARF-INK4B locus on chromosome 9p21, frequently lost in human cancer, encodes the INK4 family members p16INK5A and p15INK4B, as well as the unrelated protein, ARF (1).p16 INK4A expression, typically repressed in the absence of stress, is thought to drive cells into senescence, and p16 INK4A expression is a commonly used marker of senescent cells (2). p16INK4A protein expression is often altered in human cancer (3,4), and high expression is currently used as a predictive biomarker in cervical cancer (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: THEX1 (3’hExo) is a 3’ exonuclease that may play a role in the degradation of histone mRNA transcripts (1). A recently identified member of the DEDDh 3' exonuclease family, THEX1 binds the conserved stem-loop structure found at the 3’ end of mRNA in vitro (2). The binding of THEX1 to mRNA requires the presence of a terminal ACCCA sequence and is enhanced by the concurrent binding of stem-loop binding protein (SLBP). Cleavage of histone mRNA by THEX1 exonuclease may help produce the rapid turnover of histone mRNA transcripts associated with the completion of DNA replication (3). Additional evidence suggests that THEX1 may be responsible for excising the remaining few 3’ nucleotides following cleavage by a different enzyme (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: THEX1 (3’hExo) is a 3’ exonuclease that may play a role in the degradation of histone mRNA transcripts (1). A recently identified member of the DEDDh 3' exonuclease family, THEX1 binds the conserved stem-loop structure found at the 3’ end of mRNA in vitro (2). The binding of THEX1 to mRNA requires the presence of a terminal ACCCA sequence and is enhanced by the concurrent binding of stem-loop binding protein (SLBP). Cleavage of histone mRNA by THEX1 exonuclease may help produce the rapid turnover of histone mRNA transcripts associated with the completion of DNA replication (3). Additional evidence suggests that THEX1 may be responsible for excising the remaining few 3’ nucleotides following cleavage by a different enzyme (4).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Drosha was identified as a nuclear RNase III that catalyzes the initial step of microRNA (miRNA) processing (1). This enzyme processes the long primary transcript pri-miRNAs into stem-looped pre-miRNAs. Interference of Drosha results in the increase of pri-miRNAs and the decrease of pre-miRNAs (1). Drosha exists in a multiprotein complex called Microprocessor along with other components such as DGCR8 (2). Drosha, along with DGCR8, is necessary for miRNA biogenesis (3).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).