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Monoclonal Antibody Immunoprecipitation Sensory Perception of Sound

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Voltage gated sodium channels are composed of a large alpha subunit and auxiliary beta subunits. The alpha subunit has 4 homologous domains, with each domain containing 6 transmembrane segments. These segments function as the voltage sensor and sodium permeable pore. Upon change of membrane potential, the sodium channel is activated, which allows sodium ions to flow through (1,2). When associated with beta subunits or other accessory proteins, the alpha subunit is regulated at the level of cell surface expression, kinetics, and voltage dependence (3,4).There are 9 mammalian alpha subunits, named Nav1.1-Nav1.9 (5). These alpha subunits differ in tissue specificity and biophysical functions (6,7). Seven of these subunits are essential for the initiation and propagation of action potentials in the central and peripheral nervous system while Nav1.4 and Nav1.5 are mainly expressed in skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle (8,9). Mutations in these alpha channel subunits have been identified in patients with epilepsy, seizure, ataxia, sensitivity to pain, and cardiomyopathy (reviewed in 10).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) produce mitogenic and angiogenic effects in target cells by signaling through cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases. There are four members of the FGF receptor family: FGFR1 (flg), FGFR2 (bek, KGFR), FGFR3, and FGFR4. Each receptor contains an extracellular ligand binding domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic kinase domain (1). Following ligand binding and dimerization, the receptors are phosphorylated at specific tyrosine residues (2). Seven tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tail of FGFR1 can be phosphorylated: Tyr463, 583, 585, 653, 654, 730, and 766. Tyr653 and Tyr654 are important for catalytic activity of activated FGFR and are essential for signaling (3). The other phosphorylated tyrosine residues may provide docking sites for downstream signaling components such as Crk and PLCγ (4,5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) produce mitogenic and angiogenic effects in target cells by signaling through cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases. There are four members of the FGF receptor family: FGFR1 (flg), FGFR2 (bek, KGFR), FGFR3, and FGFR4. Each receptor contains an extracellular ligand binding domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic kinase domain (1). Following ligand binding and dimerization, the receptors are phosphorylated at specific tyrosine residues (2). Seven tyrosine residues in the cytoplasmic tail of FGFR1 can be phosphorylated: Tyr463, 583, 585, 653, 654, 730, and 766. Tyr653 and Tyr654 are important for catalytic activity of activated FGFR and are essential for signaling (3). The other phosphorylated tyrosine residues may provide docking sites for downstream signaling components such as Crk and PLCγ (4,5).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter dopamine and other catecholamines. TH functions as a tetramer, with each subunit composed of a regulatory and catalytic domain, and exists in several different isoforms (1,2). This enzyme is required for embryonic development since TH knockout mice die before or at birth (3). Levels of transcription, translation and posttranslational modification regulate TH activity. The amino-terminal regulatory domain contains three serine residues: Ser9, Ser31 and Ser40. Phosphorylation at Ser40 by PKA positively regulates the catalytic activity of TH (4-6). Phosphorylation at Ser31 by CDK5 also increases the catalytic activity of TH through stabilization of TH protein levels (7-9).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Type 1 collagen is the most abundant collagen in many human tissues, including bone, skin, and tendons. It is a trimeric complex comprised of two molecules of COL1A1 (alpha-1 type 1 collagen) and one molecule of COL1A2 (alpha-2 type 1 collagen) (1-3). The expression levels of COL1A1 are regulated by multiple mechanisms, including mRNA stability, translation, and posttranslational modification (3-5). Overexpression of COL1A1 has been positively associated with tissue fibrosis disorders, including systemic sclerosis (6), while loss-of-function mutations in the COL1A1 gene are a major causative factor for osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bone disease) (7). Notably, COL1A1 expression levels have also been associated with tumor development in gastric, lung, thyroid, and breast cancers. Research studies suggest that upregulation of COL1A1 can generate a modified extracellular matrix environment that promotes cancer cell survival, proliferation, metastasis, and invasion (8-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Type 1 collagen is the most abundant collagen in many human tissues, including bone, skin, and tendons. It is a trimeric complex comprised of two molecules of COL1A1 (alpha-1 type 1 collagen) and one molecule of COL1A2 (alpha-2 type 1 collagen) (1-3). The expression levels of COL1A1 are regulated by multiple mechanisms, including mRNA stability, translation, and posttranslational modification (3-5). Overexpression of COL1A1 has been positively associated with tissue fibrosis disorders, including systemic sclerosis (6), while loss-of-function mutations in the COL1A1 gene are a major causative factor for osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bone disease) (7). Notably, COL1A1 expression levels have also been associated with tumor development in gastric, lung, thyroid, and breast cancers. Research studies suggest that upregulation of COL1A1 can generate a modified extracellular matrix environment that promotes cancer cell survival, proliferation, metastasis, and invasion (8-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CHD7 belongs to the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding (CHD) family of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling proteins (1). The CHD family of proteins has been shown to play an important role in regulating gene expression by altering the chromatin structure at target genes (1,2). The nine members of the CHD family are characterized by the presence of two tandem chromodomains in the N-terminal region and an SNF2-like ATPase domain near the central region of the protein (2-4). The CHD proteins can be further divided into three subgroups based on the presence of additional conserved functional domains. CHD7 belongs to the third subgroup of CHD proteins together with CHD6, 8, and 9, which are distinguished by the presence of three conserved region (CR) domains, a switching-defective protein 3, adaptor 2, nuclear receptor co-repressor, transcription factor IIB (SANT) like domain, two brahma and kismet (BRK) domains, and a DNA binding domain (2). CHD7 regulates embryonic stem cell (ESC) specific gene expression together with ESC master regulators Oct-4, Sox2 and nanog, and is necessary for neural stem cell development and formation of the neural crest (5-7). Research studies have shown that CHD7 mutations are frequently found in patients with CHARGE syndrome (coloboma of the eye, heart defects, atresia of the choanae, retardation of growth/development, genital/urinary abnormalities, and ear abnormalities and deafness) (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Axin1 (Axis inhibition protein 1) and Axin2 are multidomain scaffold proteins that negatively regulate Wnt signaling. Axin1 interacts with APC, GSK-3β, Dvl, and β-catenin and promotes the GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of β-catenin (1,2). Upon stimulation of cells with Wnt, Axin1 is recruited to the membrane by phosphorylated LRP5/6, a process that is believed to be crucial for activation of Wnt signaling (3,4). In addition to its role in the Wnt signaling pathway, Axin1 forms a complex with MEKK1 and activates c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK/SAPK) (5). Axin2 (also known as Conductin or Axil) can functionally substitute for Axin1 in mice (6). Axin2 itself is a direct target of the Wnt signaling pathway and therefore serves to control the duration and/or intensity of Wnt signaling through a negative feedback loop (7-9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: SOD1, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, is a major antioxidant enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of superoxide anion to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen (1). SOD1 is ubiquitously expressed and is localized in the cytosol, nucleus and mitochondrial intermembrane space. The SOD1 gene locus is on chromosome 21 in a region affected in Down Syndrome (2). In addition, over 100 distinct SOD1 inherited mutations have been identified in the familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive degenerative disease of motor neurons (3-5). Despite the fact that SOD1 helps to eliminate toxic reactive species, its mutations in ALS have been described as gain-of-function (5). The mechanism by which mutant SOD1 induces the neurodegeneration observed in ALS is still unclear. Mutant SOD1 proteins become misfolded and consequently oligomerize into high molecular weight species that aggregate and end up in proteinaceous inclusions (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dynamin is a family of large GTPases that has been implicated in the formation of vesicles of both the endocytotic and secretory processes (1). Dynamin plays an important role in the internalization of cell surface receptors, a process that attenuates the response to extracellular signals. It has been illustrated that dynamin interacts with signaling proteins such as Src, PLCγ, PKC and G-proteins. PKC and Src phosphorylate dynamin, and its phosphorylation may regulate the endocytosis of cell surface receptors (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. During neurotransmission, glutamate is released from vesicles of the pre-synaptic cell, and glutamate receptors (e.g. NMDA Receptor, AMPA Receptor) bind glutamate for activation at the opposing post-synaptic cell. Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) regulate and maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below excitotoxic levels. In addition, glutamate transporters may limit the duration of synaptic excitation by an electrogenic process in which the transmitter is cotransported with three sodium ions and one proton, followed by countertransport of a potassium ion. Five EAATs (EAAT1-5) are characterized: EAAT2 (GLT-1) is primarily expressed in astrocytes but is also expressed in neurons of the retina and during fetal development (1). Homozygous EAAT2 knockout mice have spontaneous, lethal seizures and an increased predisposition to acute cortical injury (2). PKC phosphorylates Ser113 of EAAT2 and coincides with glutamate transport (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF1 or EBP-50) is one of several related PDZ domain-containing proteins (1). NHERF1 was first identified as a necessary cofactor for cyclic AMP-associated inhibition of Na+/ H+ exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) (2). NHERF1 is a multifunctional adaptor protein that interacts with receptors and ion transporters via its PDZ domains, and with the ERM family of proteins, including merlin, via its carboxy-terminus (2,3). NHERF1 may play an important role in breast cancer. Estrogen has been found to induce NHERF1 in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells (2,3). Furthermore, NHERF1 has been shown to bind to PDGFR, which is activated in breast carcinomas. NHERF1 has been found to promote the formation of a ternary complex containing PTEN, NHERF1, and PDGFR. Therefore, NHERF1 may function to recruit PTEN to PDGFR to inhibit the activation of PI3K/Akt signaling in normal cells; this mechanism may be disrupted in cancer (4). NHERF1 also binds to the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which functions as an ion channel and has disease-causing mutations in cystic fibrosis (5). Other proposed functions of NHERF1 include testicular differentiation, endosomal recycling, membrane targeting, protein sorting, and trafficking (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Sprouty (Spry) family of proteins are antagonists of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-induced signaling (1, 2). The Spry proteins play crucial roles in regulating growth and development of living organisms. Since originally discovered in Drosophila, four human orthologs of Spry proteins (Spry1-4) have been identified. All human Spry proteins possess a conserved carboxyl-terminal cysteine-rich SPR domain, which harbors a signal for protein translocation from cytosol to membrane ruffles (3,4). The SPR domain also enables the Spry proteins to form homo- or hetero-dimers and to interact with other proteins including kinases and phosphatases. The SPR domain is essential for the inhibitory modulation of Spry proteins on RTK signaling (1,2).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Axin1 (Axis inhibition protein 1) and Axin2 are multidomain scaffold proteins that negatively regulate Wnt signaling. Axin1 interacts with APC, GSK-3β, Dvl, and β-catenin and promotes the GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of β-catenin (1,2). Upon stimulation of cells with Wnt, Axin1 is recruited to the membrane by phosphorylated LRP5/6, a process that is believed to be crucial for activation of Wnt signaling (3,4). In addition to its role in the Wnt signaling pathway, Axin1 forms a complex with MEKK1 and activates c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK/SAPK) (5). Axin2 (also known as Conductin or Axil) can functionally substitute for Axin1 in mice (6). Axin2 itself is a direct target of the Wnt signaling pathway and therefore serves to control the duration and/or intensity of Wnt signaling through a negative feedback loop (7-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tight junctions, or zona occludens, form a continuous barrier to fluids across the epithelium and endothelium. They function in regulation of paracellular permeability and in the maintenance of cell polarity, blocking the movement of transmembrane proteins between the apical and the basolateral cell surfaces (reviewed in 1). Zona occludens proteins ZO-1, -2, and -3 (also known as TJP1, 2, and 3) are peripheral membrane adaptor proteins that link junctional transmembrane proteins such as occludin and claudin to the actin cytoskeleton (reviewed in 2). ZO-1 and -2 are required for tight junction formation and function (3,4). In subconfluent proliferating cells, ZO-1 and ZO-2 have been shown to colocalize to the nucleus and play a role in transcriptional regulation, possibly through facilitating nuclear import/export of transcriptional regulators (5-7). The ZO-2 gene is transcribed from two promoters, generating the ZO-2A and ZO-2C isoforms. ZO-2C lacks a 23 amino acid amino-terminal sequence found in other ZO-2 isoforms. While both isoforms appear to be widely expressed, abnormal regulation of the ZO-2 gene may be correlated with development of ductal cancer (8).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Sine oculis homeobox (SIX) proteins belong to a family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors discovered in Drosophila mutant screens for embryonic eye development genes (1-3). The prototypical family member (sine oculis, so) was named for eyeless embryos carrying mutations in a gene highly conserved among vertebrates, including humans (SIX1) (4). A total of six family members (SIX1-6) have been identified in vertebrates. Each SIX protein contains a homeobox nucleic acid recognition domain (HD) with a DNA-binding helix-turn-helix motif and an adjacent SIX domain, which may be involved in regulating protein-protein interactions (5). In addition to their critical functions during embryonic organogenesis, research studies suggest that SIX proteins play additional roles in postnatal cell cycle regulation, with potentially important implications in tumorigenesis (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Axin1 (Axis inhibition protein 1) and Axin2 are multidomain scaffold proteins that negatively regulate Wnt signaling. Axin1 interacts with APC, GSK-3β, Dvl, and β-catenin and promotes the GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of β-catenin (1,2). Upon stimulation of cells with Wnt, Axin1 is recruited to the membrane by phosphorylated LRP5/6, a process that is believed to be crucial for activation of Wnt signaling (3,4). In addition to its role in the Wnt signaling pathway, Axin1 forms a complex with MEKK1 and activates c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK/SAPK) (5). Axin2 (also known as Conductin or Axil) can functionally substitute for Axin1 in mice (6). Axin2 itself is a direct target of the Wnt signaling pathway and therefore serves to control the duration and/or intensity of Wnt signaling through a negative feedback loop (7-9).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: c-Kit is a member of the subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases that includes PDGF, CSF-1, and FLT3/flk-2 receptors (1,2). It plays a critical role in activation and growth in a number of cell types including hematopoietic stem cells, mast cells, melanocytes, and germ cells (3). Upon binding with its stem cell factor (SCF) ligand, c-Kit undergoes dimerization/oligomerization and autophosphorylation. Activation of c-Kit results in the recruitment and tyrosine phosphorylation of downstream SH2-containing signaling components including PLCγ, the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase, SHP2, and CrkL (4). Molecular lesions that impair the kinase activity of c-Kit are associated with a variety of developmental disorders (5), and mutations that constitutively activate c-Kit can lead to pathogenesis of mastocytosis and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (6). Tyr719 is located in the kinase insert region of the catalytic domain. c-Kit phosphorylated at Tyr719 binds to the p85 subunit of PI3 kinase in vitro and in vivo (7).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. During neurotransmission, glutamate is released from vesicles of the pre-synaptic cell, and glutamate receptors (e.g. NMDA Receptor, AMPA Receptor) bind glutamate for activation at the opposing post-synaptic cell. Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) regulate and maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below excitotoxic levels. In addition, glutamate transporters may limit the duration of synaptic excitation by an electrogenic process in which the transmitter is cotransported with three sodium ions and one proton, followed by countertransport of a potassium ion. Five EAATs (EAAT1-5) are characterized: EAAT2 (GLT-1) is primarily expressed in astrocytes but is also expressed in neurons of the retina and during fetal development (1). Homozygous EAAT2 knockout mice have spontaneous, lethal seizures and an increased predisposition to acute cortical injury (2). PKC phosphorylates Ser113 of EAAT2 and coincides with glutamate transport (3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tight junctions, or zona occludens, form a continuous barrier to fluids across the epithelium and endothelium. They function in regulation of paracellular permeability and in the maintenance of cell polarity, blocking the movement of transmembrane proteins between the apical and the basolateral cell surfaces (reviewed in 1). Zona occludens proteins ZO-1, -2, and -3 (also known as TJP1, 2, and 3) are peripheral membrane adaptor proteins that link junctional transmembrane proteins such as occludin and claudin to the actin cytoskeleton (reviewed in 2). ZO-1 and -2 are required for tight junction formation and function (3,4). In subconfluent proliferating cells, ZO-1 and ZO-2 have been shown to colocalize to the nucleus and play a role in transcriptional regulation, possibly through facilitating nuclear import/export of transcriptional regulators (5-7). The ZO-2 gene is transcribed from two promoters, generating the ZO-2A and ZO-2C isoforms. ZO-2C lacks a 23 amino acid amino-terminal sequence found in other ZO-2 isoforms. While both isoforms appear to be widely expressed, abnormal regulation of the ZO-2 gene may be correlated with development of ductal cancer (8).