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Monoclonal Antibody Mrna Stabilization

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The ELAVL (embryonic lethal, abnormal vision and Drosophila-like) family of proteins includes ELAVL1/HuR, ELAVL2/HuB, ELAVL3/HuC and ELAVL4/HuD (1). ELAVL1/HuR is ubiquitously expressed whereas expression of the other three members is neuronal-specific (1). ELAVL/Hu proteins are highly conserved RNA-binding proteins (1). Besides three RNA recognition motifs, these proteins also contain nuclear localization signals that enable them to shuttle between nucleus and cytoplasm (2). Upon inhibition of transcription by actinomycin D, ELAVL1/HuR relocates from nucleus to cytoplasm where it binds the AU-rich elements within 3' UTRs to stabilize mRNAs (3, 4). ELAVL1/HuR is suggested to increase translation by binding to mRNAs (5,6). In addition, ELAVL1/HuR interacts with microRNAs (miRNAs) (7).

$305
50 assays
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometric analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated ELAVL1/HuR (D9W7E) Rabbit mAb #12582.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The ELAVL (embryonic lethal, abnormal vision and Drosophila-like) family of proteins includes ELAVL1/HuR, ELAVL2/HuB, ELAVL3/HuC and ELAVL4/HuD (1). ELAVL1/HuR is ubiquitously expressed whereas expression of the other three members is neuronal-specific (1). ELAVL/Hu proteins are highly conserved RNA-binding proteins (1). Besides three RNA recognition motifs, these proteins also contain nuclear localization signals that enable them to shuttle between nucleus and cytoplasm (2). Upon inhibition of transcription by actinomycin D, ELAVL1/HuR relocates from nucleus to cytoplasm where it binds the AU-rich elements within 3' UTRs to stabilize mRNAs (3, 4). ELAVL1/HuR is suggested to increase translation by binding to mRNAs (5,6). In addition, ELAVL1/HuR interacts with microRNAs (miRNAs) (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABP1) associates with the 3' poly(A) tail of mRNA and also eIF4F (1,2). eIF4F is a complex whose functions include the recognition of the mRNA 5' cap structure (eIF4E), delivery of an RNA helicase to the 5' region (eIF4A), bridging of the mRNA and the ribosome (eIF4G), and circularization of the mRNA via interaction between eIF4G and the poly(A) binding protein (PABP). PABP1 has been shown to have multiple functions including translation initiation, mRNA stabilization, and mRNA turnover (3,4). Phosphorylation of PABP has been shown to enhance RNA binding in eukaryotes, and PABP1 has been shown to shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm (5,6). PABP1 is methylated on Arg455 and Arg460 by the CARM1 protein methyltransferase (7,8); however, the function of this methylation has yet to be determined.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: AU-rich element RNA binding protein 1 (AUF1) is also known as heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein D (hnRNP D). AUF1 binds to the AU rich element (ARE) of target mRNA and regulates mRNA decay (1,2). It has a broad range of target genes including IL-1, IL-2, IL-3, Myc, TNF-α, and cyclin D1 (2). Binding of AUF1 to Myc mRNA also affects translation of Myc (3). Recent studies have provided evidence that AUF1 is also involved in the regulation of transcription. AUF1 binds to the promoters of various genes including complement receptor 2 (4), enkephalin (5), and α-fetoprotein (6). AUF1 also binds to the telomerase catalytic subunit Tert promoter and the G-rich telomeric repeat, thus regulating telomere maintenance and normal aging (7,8). AUF1 has four isoforms produced by alternative splicing of a single transcript: p37, p40, p42, and p45 (9,10). All AUF1 isoforms shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm (11, 12). These isoforms have distinct localization and bind to different target mRNAs that contribute to the diversity of AUF1 function (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Dicer is a member of the RNase III family that specifically cleaves double-stranded RNAs to generate microRNAs (miRNAs) (1). After long primary transcript pri-miRNAs are processed to stem-looped pre-miRNAs by Drosha (2), pre-miRNAs are transported to the cytoplasm and further processed by Dicer to produce 22-nucleotide mature miRNAs (3). The mature miRNA then becomes a part of the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) and can bind to the 3' UTR of the target mRNA (3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dicer is a member of the RNase III family that specifically cleaves double-stranded RNAs to generate microRNAs (miRNAs) (1). After long primary transcript pri-miRNAs are processed to stem-looped pre-miRNAs by Drosha (2), pre-miRNAs are transported to the cytoplasm and further processed by Dicer to produce 22-nucleotide mature miRNAs (3). The mature miRNA then becomes a part of the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) and can bind to the 3' UTR of the target mRNA (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cold-induced RNA-binding protein (CIRBP) is a 172-residue, multifunctional sensor protein that was first isolated as a protein induced in mouse fibroblasts cultured at 32ºC (1). Conversely, CIRBP expression decreases in cells or tissues subjected to increased temperature (2). The CIRBP protein is composed of an amino-terminal RNA-binding domain and a carboxyl-terminal, glycine-rich domain (1). Stressful stimuli, such as hypoxia, heat shock, osmotic shock, or oxidative conditions, lead to translocation of CIRBP from the nucleus to cytoplasmic stress granules through a mechanism involving CIRBP methylation-dependent nuclear export (3). CIRBP plays a role in regulating apoptosis and preserving the stemness of neural stem cells at moderately low temperatures (4). Research studies demonstrate that CIRBP contributes to the regulation of circadian rhythm through post-translational modulation of CLOCK expression (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: RNase L is an antiviral protein that is expressed in most mammalian cells (1). Latent RNase L in the cytoplasm is activated by the second messenger 2’,5’-linked oligoadenylate (2-5A), which is produced by oligoadenylate synthase (OAS) after it binds viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) (2, 3). RNase L forms a crossed homodimer that is stabilized by kinase homology and ankyrin domains, which position two kinase extension nuclease domains for RNA recognition (4). RNase L then degrades both viral and cellular RNA (5). In mouse models, RNase L has been shown to produce small self-RNAs that act to amplify innate antiviral immunity through IFN-β induction (6). Research has also shown that RNase L forms a complex with Filamin A that acts as a barrier to restrict virus entry, and that RNase L can induce autophagy in response to viral infection (7, 8). Finally, research suggests RNase L may contribute to type I diabetes onset through immune response regulation (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is a neuropeptide synthesized as a precursor that is processed to an active mature peptide of 28 residues (1). VIP is produced by neurons, endocrine, and immune cells and is expressed in many tissues, in agreement with its various biological functions (2). VIP acts through activation of two receptors belonging to the G protein-coupled receptor family, VPAC1 and VPAC2 (2) and elicits several effects such as vasodilation, regulation of smooth muscle cell contractility, and blood flow in the gastrointestinal track (3,4). In addition, VIP is involved in the regulation of T cell differentiation (6), and in immunosuppression (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is a neuropeptide synthesized as a precursor that is processed to an active mature peptide of 28 residues (1). VIP is produced by neurons, endocrine, and immune cells and is expressed in many tissues, in agreement with its various biological functions (2). VIP acts through activation of two receptors belonging to the G protein-coupled receptor family, VPAC1 and VPAC2 (2) and elicits several effects such as vasodilation, regulation of smooth muscle cell contractility, and blood flow in the gastrointestinal track (3,4). In addition, VIP is involved in the regulation of T cell differentiation (6), and in immunosuppression (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Axin1 (Axis inhibition protein 1) and Axin2 are multidomain scaffold proteins that negatively regulate Wnt signaling. Axin1 interacts with APC, GSK-3β, Dvl, and β-catenin and promotes the GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of β-catenin (1,2). Upon stimulation of cells with Wnt, Axin1 is recruited to the membrane by phosphorylated LRP5/6, a process that is believed to be crucial for activation of Wnt signaling (3,4). In addition to its role in the Wnt signaling pathway, Axin1 forms a complex with MEKK1 and activates c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK/SAPK) (5). Axin2 (also known as Conductin or Axil) can functionally substitute for Axin1 in mice (6). Axin2 itself is a direct target of the Wnt signaling pathway and therefore serves to control the duration and/or intensity of Wnt signaling through a negative feedback loop (7-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Axin1 (Axis inhibition protein 1) and Axin2 are multidomain scaffold proteins that negatively regulate Wnt signaling. Axin1 interacts with APC, GSK-3β, Dvl, and β-catenin and promotes the GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of β-catenin (1,2). Upon stimulation of cells with Wnt, Axin1 is recruited to the membrane by phosphorylated LRP5/6, a process that is believed to be crucial for activation of Wnt signaling (3,4). In addition to its role in the Wnt signaling pathway, Axin1 forms a complex with MEKK1 and activates c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK/SAPK) (5). Axin2 (also known as Conductin or Axil) can functionally substitute for Axin1 in mice (6). Axin2 itself is a direct target of the Wnt signaling pathway and therefore serves to control the duration and/or intensity of Wnt signaling through a negative feedback loop (7-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Ape1 (Apurinic/Apyrimidic eEndonuclease 1), also known as Ref1 (Redox effector factor 1), is a multifunctional protein with several biological activities. These include roles in DNA repair and in the cellular response to oxidative stress. Ape1 initiates the repair of abasic sites and is essential for the base excision repair (BER) pathway (1). Repair activities of Ape1 are stimulated by interaction with XRCC1 (2), another essential protein in BER. Ape1 functions as a redox factor that maintains transcription factors in an active, reduced state but can also function in a redox-independent manner as a transcriptional cofactor to control different cellular fates such as apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation (3). Increased expression of Ape1 is associated with many types of cancers including cervical, ovarian, prostate, rhabdomyosarcomas and germ cell tumors (4). Ape1 has been shown to stimulate DNA binding of several transcription factors known to be involved in tumor progression such as Fos, Jun, NF-κB, PAX, HIF-1, HLF and p53 (4). Mutation of the Ape1 gene has also been associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HSP70 and HSP90 are molecular chaperones expressed constitutively under normal conditions to maintain protein homeostasis and are induced upon environmental stress (1). Both HSP70 and HSP90 are able to interact with unfolded proteins to prevent irreversible aggregation and catalyze the refolding of their substrates in an ATP- and co-chaperone-dependent manner (1). HSP70 has a broad range of substrates including newly synthesized and denatured proteins, while HSP90 tends to have a more limited subset of substrates, most of which are signaling molecules. HSP70 and HSP90 often function collaboratively in a multi-chaperone system, which requires a minimal set of co-chaperones: HSP40, Hop, and p23 (2,3). The co-chaperones either regulate the intrinsic ATPase activity of the chaperones or recruit chaperones to specific substrates or subcellular compartments (1,4). When the ubiquitin ligase CHIP associates with the HSP70/HSP90 complex as a cofactor, the unfolded substrates are subjected to degradation by the proteasome (4). The biological functions of HSP70/HSP90 extend beyond their chaperone activity. They are essential for the maturation and inactivation of nuclear hormones and other signaling molecules (1,3). They also play a role in vesicle formation and protein trafficking (2).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: HSP70 and HSP90 are molecular chaperones expressed constitutively under normal conditions to maintain protein homeostasis and are induced upon environmental stress (1). Both HSP70 and HSP90 are able to interact with unfolded proteins to prevent irreversible aggregation and catalyze the refolding of their substrates in an ATP- and co-chaperone-dependent manner (1). HSP70 has a broad range of substrates including newly synthesized and denatured proteins, while HSP90 tends to have a more limited subset of substrates, most of which are signaling molecules. HSP70 and HSP90 often function collaboratively in a multi-chaperone system, which requires a minimal set of co-chaperones: HSP40, Hop, and p23 (2,3). The co-chaperones either regulate the intrinsic ATPase activity of the chaperones or recruit chaperones to specific substrates or subcellular compartments (1,4). When the ubiquitin ligase CHIP associates with the HSP70/HSP90 complex as a cofactor, the unfolded substrates are subjected to degradation by the proteasome (4). The biological functions of HSP70/HSP90 extend beyond their chaperone activity. They are essential for the maturation and inactivation of nuclear hormones and other signaling molecules (1,3). They also play a role in vesicle formation and protein trafficking (2).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
Cell Signaling Technology Antibody conjugated to Alexa Fluor®647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct Flow Cytometric analysis of human cells. The unconjugated antibody #4135 reacts with, among others, human, mouse and hamster Cyclin B1. CST expects that Cyclin B1 Mouse mAb (Alexa Fluor®647 conjugate) will also recognize Cyclin B1 in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cyclins are a family of proteins that activate specific cyclin-dependent kinases required for progression through the cell cycle. The entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by activation of cdc2/cdk1 at the G2/M transition. This activation is a multi-step process that begins with the binding of the regulatory subunit, cyclin B1, to cdc2/cdk1 to form the mitosis-promoting factor (MPF). MPF remains in the inactive state until phosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr161 by cdk activating kinase (CAK) (1,2) and dephosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr14/Tyr15 by cdc25C (3-5). Five cyclin B1 phosphorylation sites (Ser116, 126, 128, 133, and 147) are located in the cytoplasmic retention signal (CRS) domain and are thought to regulate the translocation of cyclin B1 to the nucleus at the G2/M checkpoint, promoting nuclear accumulation and initiation of mitosis (6-9). While MPF itself can phosphorylate Ser126 and Ser128, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) phosphorylates cyclin B1 preferentially at Ser133 and possibly at Ser147 (6,10). At the end of mitosis, cyclin B1 is targeted for degradation by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), allowing for cell cycle progression (11). Research studies have shown that cyclin B1 is overexpressed in breast, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers (12-14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclins are a family of proteins that activate specific cyclin-dependent kinases required for progression through the cell cycle. The entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by activation of cdc2/cdk1 at the G2/M transition. This activation is a multi-step process that begins with the binding of the regulatory subunit, cyclin B1, to cdc2/cdk1 to form the mitosis-promoting factor (MPF). MPF remains in the inactive state until phosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr161 by cdk activating kinase (CAK) (1,2) and dephosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr14/Tyr15 by cdc25C (3-5). Five cyclin B1 phosphorylation sites (Ser116, 126, 128, 133, and 147) are located in the cytoplasmic retention signal (CRS) domain and are thought to regulate the translocation of cyclin B1 to the nucleus at the G2/M checkpoint, promoting nuclear accumulation and initiation of mitosis (6-9). While MPF itself can phosphorylate Ser126 and Ser128, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) phosphorylates cyclin B1 preferentially at Ser133 and possibly at Ser147 (6,10). At the end of mitosis, cyclin B1 is targeted for degradation by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), allowing for cell cycle progression (11). Research studies have shown that cyclin B1 is overexpressed in breast, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers (12-14).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cyclins are a family of proteins that activate specific cyclin-dependent kinases required for progression through the cell cycle. The entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by activation of cdc2/cdk1 at the G2/M transition. This activation is a multi-step process that begins with the binding of the regulatory subunit, cyclin B1, to cdc2/cdk1 to form the mitosis-promoting factor (MPF). MPF remains in the inactive state until phosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr161 by cdk activating kinase (CAK) (1,2) and dephosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr14/Tyr15 by cdc25C (3-5). Five cyclin B1 phosphorylation sites (Ser116, 126, 128, 133, and 147) are located in the cytoplasmic retention signal (CRS) domain and are thought to regulate the translocation of cyclin B1 to the nucleus at the G2/M checkpoint, promoting nuclear accumulation and initiation of mitosis (6-9). While MPF itself can phosphorylate Ser126 and Ser128, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) phosphorylates cyclin B1 preferentially at Ser133 and possibly at Ser147 (6,10). At the end of mitosis, cyclin B1 is targeted for degradation by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), allowing for cell cycle progression (11). Research studies have shown that cyclin B1 is overexpressed in breast, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers (12-14).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
Cell Signaling Technology Antibody conjugated to Alexa Fluor ® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct Flow Cytometric analysis of human cells. The unconjugated antibody, #4135, reacts with human and mouse. CST expects that Cyclin B1 (V152) Mouse mAb (Alexa Fluor®488 conjugate) will also recognize Cyclin B1 in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Cyclins are a family of proteins that activate specific cyclin-dependent kinases required for progression through the cell cycle. The entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by activation of cdc2/cdk1 at the G2/M transition. This activation is a multi-step process that begins with the binding of the regulatory subunit, cyclin B1, to cdc2/cdk1 to form the mitosis-promoting factor (MPF). MPF remains in the inactive state until phosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr161 by cdk activating kinase (CAK) (1,2) and dephosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr14/Tyr15 by cdc25C (3-5). Five cyclin B1 phosphorylation sites (Ser116, 126, 128, 133, and 147) are located in the cytoplasmic retention signal (CRS) domain and are thought to regulate the translocation of cyclin B1 to the nucleus at the G2/M checkpoint, promoting nuclear accumulation and initiation of mitosis (6-9). While MPF itself can phosphorylate Ser126 and Ser128, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) phosphorylates cyclin B1 preferentially at Ser133 and possibly at Ser147 (6,10). At the end of mitosis, cyclin B1 is targeted for degradation by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), allowing for cell cycle progression (11). Research studies have shown that cyclin B1 is overexpressed in breast, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers (12-14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Deleted in breast cancer gene 1 protein (DBC1) was originally identified by its localization to a region of chromosome 8p21 that is homozygously deleted in breast cancer (1). DBC1 is a large, nuclear protein with multiple functions in cell survival. It binds directly to the estrogen receptor α (ERα) hormone-binding domain in a ligand-independent manner and may be a key determinant of ligand-independent ERα expression and survival in human breast cancer cells (2). DBC1 can promote p53-mediated apoptosis by binding to and inhibiting the deacetylase activity of SirT1, resulting in increased p53 acetylation levels and activity (3). DBC1 may be an important regulator of heterochromatin formation as it binds SUV39H1 and inhibits its histone methyltransferase activity (4). Caspase-dependent processing activates the pro-apoptotic activity of DBC1 during Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α)-mediated cell death signaling (5). This processing of DBC1 in response to TNF-α is an early event in the onset of apoptosis and results in relocalization of DBC1 to the cytoplasm. Overexpression of the processed, cytoplasmic form of DBC1 results in mitochondrial clustering and matrix condensation and sensitizes cells to TNF-α-mediated apoptosis.