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Monoclonal Antibody Multicellular Organismal Aging

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The RecQ family of DNA and RNA helicases is a family of enzymes that has been shown to be important to genome integrity (1). Members of this family function in several DNA repair processes including double strand break repair, homologous recombination, and re-initiation of DNA replication at stalled replication forks (2,3). Mutations in RecQ helicase family members results in syndromes that display varying types of chromosomal abnormalities and overall genomic instability (1). WRN is a member of the RecQ family that has been identified as the gene underlying Werner’s syndrome; an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by premature aging and predisposition to cancer (4). Cells from Werner’s Syndrome patients exhibit genomic instability that is associated with deficient DNA repair activity (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: DNA repair systems operate in all living cells to manage a variety of DNA lesions. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is implemented in cases where bulky helix-distorting lesions occur, such as those brought about by UV and certain chemicals (1). Excision Repair Cross Complementing 1 (ERCC1) forms a complex with ERCC4/XPF, which acts as the 5’ endonuclease required to excise the lesion (2). ERCC1-XPF is also required for repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) (3) and involved in repair of double strand breaks (4). Research studies have shown that expression of ERCC1 is related to survival rate and response to chemotherapeutic drugs in several human cancers including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (5,6).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: DNA repair systems operate in all living cells to manage a variety of DNA lesions. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is implemented in cases where bulky helix-distorting lesions occur, such as those brought about by UV and certain chemicals (1). Excision Repair Cross Complementing 1 (ERCC1) forms a complex with ERCC4/XPF, which acts as the 5’ endonuclease required to excise the lesion (2). ERCC1-XPF is also required for repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) (3) and involved in repair of double strand breaks (4). Research studies have shown that expression of ERCC1 is related to survival rate and response to chemotherapeutic drugs in several human cancers including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). In addition to p53, mammalian cells contain two p53 family members, p63 and p73, which are similar to p53 in both structure and function (2). While p63 can induce p53-responsive genes and apoptosis, mutation of p63 rarely results in tumors (2). Research investigators frequently observe amplification of the p63 gene in squamous cell carcinomas of the lung, head and neck (2,3). The p63 gene contains an alternative transcription initiation site that yields a truncated ΔNp63 lacking the transactivation domain, and alternative splicing at the carboxy-terminus yields the α, β, and γ isoforms (3,4).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). In addition to p53, mammalian cells contain two p53 family members, p63 and p73, which are similar to p53 in both structure and function (2). While p63 can induce p53-responsive genes and apoptosis, mutation of p63 rarely results in tumors (2). Research investigators frequently observe amplification of the p63 gene in squamous cell carcinomas of the lung, head and neck (2,3). The p63 gene contains an alternative transcription initiation site that yields a truncated ΔNp63 lacking the transactivation domain, and alternative splicing at the carboxy-terminus yields the α, β, and γ isoforms (3,4).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). In addition to p53, mammalian cells contain two p53 family members, p63 and p73, which are similar to p53 in both structure and function (2). While p63 can induce p53-responsive genes and apoptosis, mutation of p63 rarely results in tumors (2). Research investigators frequently observe amplification of the p63 gene in squamous cell carcinomas of the lung, head and neck (2,3). The p63 gene contains an alternative transcription initiation site that yields a truncated ΔNp63 lacking the transactivation domain, and alternative splicing at the carboxy-terminus yields the α, β, and γ isoforms (3,4).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated p63-α (D2K8X) XP® Rabbit mAb #13109.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). In addition to p53, mammalian cells contain two p53 family members, p63 and p73, which are similar to p53 in both structure and function (2). While p63 can induce p53-responsive genes and apoptosis, mutation of p63 rarely results in tumors (2). Research investigators frequently observe amplification of the p63 gene in squamous cell carcinomas of the lung, head and neck (2,3). The p63 gene contains an alternative transcription initiation site that yields a truncated ΔNp63 lacking the transactivation domain, and alternative splicing at the carboxy-terminus yields the α, β, and γ isoforms (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: L-DOPA decarboxylase (DDC) is a pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the decarboxylation of L-DOPA to dopamine (1) and L-5HTP to serotonin (2). By catalyzing the reaction to produce dopamine, DDC is involved in many important metabolic processes and plays a central role in the complex neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network (1). DDC is expressed in the central nervous system (3), but has also been detected in some peripheral organs such as the liver and adrenal gland, as well as leukocytes of rat and human (1). DDC is thought to be the sole enzyme responsible for the synthesis of the trace amines 2-phenylethylamine, p-tyramine, and tryptamine, which are considered to act as neuromodulators (2,4). DDC is also regarded as a general biomarker for neuroendocrine tumors (3).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The orphan nuclear receptor, steroidogenic factor 1 (STF-1, also called Ad4BP), is encoded by the NR5A1 gene and plays an instrumental role in directing the transcriptional control of steroidogenesis (1). Initially identified as a tissue-specific transcriptional regulator of cytochrome P450 steroid hydroxylases, research studies of both global (2) and tissue-specific knockout mice (3-6) have demonstrated that STF-1 is required for the development of adrenal glands, gonads, ventromedial hypothalamus, and for the proper functioning of pituitary gonadotropes. Indeed, humans with mutations that render STF-1 transcriptionally inactive can present with testicular failure, ovarian failure, and adrenal insufficiency (7,8). Furthermore, dysregulation of STF-1 has been linked to diseases such as endometriosis (9) and adrenocortical carcinoma (10).Like other nuclear hormone receptors, STF-1 has a modular domain structure composed of an amino-terminal zinc finger DNA-binding domain, a ligand-binding domain, a carboxy-terminal AF-2 activation domain, and a hinge region with AF-1-like activation activity. STF-1 also contains a fushi tarazu factor 1 box, which functions as an accessory DNA binding domain (11). STF-1 is primarily phosphorylated at Ser203, which is thought to enhance its transcriptional activity by promoting complex formation with transcriptional cofactors (12). In addition to phosphorylation at Ser203, STF-1 is subject to SUMO conjugation and acetylation at ε-amino groups of target lysine residues. Whereas SUMOylation represses STF-1 function (13,14), acetylation enhances its transcriptional activity (15).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter dopamine and other catecholamines. TH functions as a tetramer, with each subunit composed of a regulatory and catalytic domain, and exists in several different isoforms (1,2). This enzyme is required for embryonic development since TH knockout mice die before or at birth (3). Levels of transcription, translation and posttranslational modification regulate TH activity. The amino-terminal regulatory domain contains three serine residues: Ser9, Ser31 and Ser40. Phosphorylation at Ser40 by PKA positively regulates the catalytic activity of TH (4-6). Phosphorylation at Ser31 by CDK5 also increases the catalytic activity of TH through stabilization of TH protein levels (7-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter dopamine and other catecholamines. TH functions as a tetramer, with each subunit composed of a regulatory and catalytic domain, and exists in several different isoforms (1,2). This enzyme is required for embryonic development since TH knockout mice die before or at birth (3). Levels of transcription, translation and posttranslational modification regulate TH activity. The amino-terminal regulatory domain contains three serine residues: Ser9, Ser31 and Ser40. Phosphorylation at Ser40 by PKA positively regulates the catalytic activity of TH (4-6). Phosphorylation at Ser31 by CDK5 also increases the catalytic activity of TH through stabilization of TH protein levels (7-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Nutrient-deprivation autophagy factor-1 (NAF-1) (also known as CISD2, CDGSH iron-sulfur domain-containing protein 2) is a member of NEET family of 2Fe-2S proteins, characterized by a unique CDGSH sequence at their Fe-S-cluster-binding domain (1). NAF-1/CISD2 is a multifunctional protein. In addition to its role in iron and ROS homeostasis, it has been shown to play a role in autophagy, neurodegenerative diseases, and aging (2-7). Enhanced expression of NAF-1/CISD2 is associated with many types of cancer. Silencing of NAF-1/CISD2 expression in cancer cells significantly inhibited proliferation and tumorigenicity; while overexpression of NAF-1/CISD2 significantly enhanced proliferation (2, 8, 9).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter dopamine and other catecholamines. TH functions as a tetramer, with each subunit composed of a regulatory and catalytic domain, and exists in several different isoforms (1,2). This enzyme is required for embryonic development since TH knockout mice die before or at birth (3). Levels of transcription, translation and posttranslational modification regulate TH activity. The amino-terminal regulatory domain contains three serine residues: Ser9, Ser31 and Ser40. Phosphorylation at Ser40 by PKA positively regulates the catalytic activity of TH (4-6). Phosphorylation at Ser31 by CDK5 also increases the catalytic activity of TH through stabilization of TH protein levels (7-9).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$327
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology (CST) antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in monkey cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated p53 (7F5) Rabbit mAb #2527.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry)

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-p53 (Ser15) (16G8) Mouse mAb #9286.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$327
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).