20% off purchase of 3 or more products* | Learn More >>

Monoclonal Antibody Western Blotting Cas9 (S. Aureus)

Also showing Monoclonal Antibody Immunofluorescence Immunocytochemistry Cas9 (S. Aureus)

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) is an RNA-guided DNA nuclease and part of the CRISPR antiviral immunity system that provides adaptive immunity against extra chromosomal genetic material (1). The CRISPR antiviral mechanism of action involves three steps: (i), acquisition of foreign DNA by host bacterium; (ii), synthesis and maturation of CRISPR RNA (crRNA), followed by the formation of RNA-Cas nuclease protein complexes; and (iii), target interference through recognition of foreign DNA by the complex and its cleavage by Cas nuclease activity (2). The type II CRISPR/Cas antiviral immunity system provides a powerful tool for precise genome editing and has potential for specific gene regulation and therapeutic applications (3). The Cas9 protein and a guide RNA consisting of a fusion between a crRNA and a trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA) must be introduced or expressed in a cell. A 20-nucleotide sequence at the 5' end of the guide RNA directs Cas9 to a specific DNA target site. As a result, Cas9 can be "programmed" to cut various DNA sites both in vitro and in cells and organisms. CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing tools have been used in many organisms, including mouse and human cells (4,5). Research studies demonstrate that CRISPR can be used to generate mutant alleles or reporter genes in rodents and primate embryonic stem cells (6-8).Cas9 (S. aureus) is a Cas9 ortholog that is smaller, but as efficient, as the more commonly used Cas9 ortholog, Cas9 (S. Pyogenes) (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
All Species Expected

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) is an RNA-guided DNA nuclease and part of the CRISPR antiviral immunity system that provides adaptive immunity against extra chromosomal genetic material (1). The CRISPR antiviral mechanism of action involves three steps: (i), acquisition of foreign DNA by host bacterium; (ii), synthesis and maturation of CRISPR RNA (crRNA), followed by the formation of RNA-Cas nuclease protein complexes; and (iii), target interference through recognition of foreign DNA by the complex and its cleavage by Cas nuclease activity (2). The type II CRISPR/Cas antiviral immunity system provides a powerful tool for precise genome editing and has potential for specific gene regulation and therapeutic applications (3). The Cas9 protein and a guide RNA consisting of a fusion between a crRNA and a trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA) must be introduced or expressed in a cell. A 20-nucleotide sequence at the 5' end of the guide RNA directs Cas9 to a specific DNA target site. As a result, Cas9 can be "programmed" to cut various DNA sites both in vitro and in cells and organisms. CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing tools have been used in many organisms, including mouse and human cells (4,5). Research studies demonstrate that CRISPR can be used to generate mutant alleles or reporter genes in rodents and primate embryonic stem cells (6-8).Cas9 (S. aureus) is a Cas9 ortholog that is smaller, but as efficient, as the more commonly used Cas9 ortholog, Cas9 (S. Pyogenes) (9).