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Monoclonal Antibody Western Blotting Heart Contraction

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Na,K-ATPase α1 (D4Y7E) Rabbit mAb #23565.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Na,K-ATPase is an integral membrane heterodimer belonging to the P-type ATPase family. This ion channel uses the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to maintain membrane potential by driving sodium export and potassium import across the plasma membrane against their electrochemical gradients. It is composed of a catalytic α subunit and a β subunit (reviewed in 1). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified for the α1 subunit. Tyr10 is phosphorylated by an as yet undetermined kinase (2), Ser16 and Ser23 are phosphorylated by PKC, and Ser943 is phosphorylated by PKA (3-5). All of these sites have been implicated in the regulation of enzyme activity in response to hormones and neurotransmitters, altering trafficking and kinetic properties of Na,K-ATPase. Altered phosphorylation in response to angiotensin II stimulates activity in the rat proximal tubule (6). Na,K-ATPase is also involved in other signal transduction pathways. Insulin regulates its localization in differentiated primary human skeletal muscle cells, and this regulation is dependent on ERK1/2 phosphorylation of the α subunit (7). Na,K-ATPase and Src form a signaling receptor complex that affects regulation of Src kinase activity and, subsequently, its downstream effectors (8,9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Na,K-ATPase is an integral membrane heterodimer belonging to the P-type ATPase family. This ion channel uses the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to maintain membrane potential by driving sodium export and potassium import across the plasma membrane against their electrochemical gradients. It is composed of a catalytic α subunit and a β subunit (reviewed in 1). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified for the α1 subunit. Tyr10 is phosphorylated by an as yet undetermined kinase (2), Ser16 and Ser23 are phosphorylated by PKC, and Ser943 is phosphorylated by PKA (3-5). All of these sites have been implicated in the regulation of enzyme activity in response to hormones and neurotransmitters, altering trafficking and kinetic properties of Na,K-ATPase. Altered phosphorylation in response to angiotensin II stimulates activity in the rat proximal tubule (6). Na,K-ATPase is also involved in other signal transduction pathways. Insulin regulates its localization in differentiated primary human skeletal muscle cells, and this regulation is dependent on ERK1/2 phosphorylation of the α subunit (7). Na,K-ATPase and Src form a signaling receptor complex that affects regulation of Src kinase activity and, subsequently, its downstream effectors (8,9).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The Na,K-ATPase is an integral membrane heterodimer belonging to the P-type ATPase family. This ion channel uses the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to maintain membrane potential by driving sodium export and potassium import across the plasma membrane against their electrochemical gradients. It is composed of a catalytic α subunit and a β subunit (reviewed in 1). Several phosphorylation sites have been identified for the α1 subunit. Tyr10 is phosphorylated by an as yet undetermined kinase (2), Ser16 and Ser23 are phosphorylated by PKC, and Ser943 is phosphorylated by PKA (3-5). All of these sites have been implicated in the regulation of enzyme activity in response to hormones and neurotransmitters, altering trafficking and kinetic properties of Na,K-ATPase. Altered phosphorylation in response to angiotensin II stimulates activity in the rat proximal tubule (6). Na,K-ATPase is also involved in other signal transduction pathways. Insulin regulates its localization in differentiated primary human skeletal muscle cells, and this regulation is dependent on ERK1/2 phosphorylation of the α subunit (7). Na,K-ATPase and Src form a signaling receptor complex that affects regulation of Src kinase activity and, subsequently, its downstream effectors (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: NCX1 (Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, isoform 1) belongs to a conserved family of sodium-calcium membrane antiporter proteins that play a fundamental role in regulating intracellular calcium levels (1). NCX1 facilitates transmembrane transport of Ca2+ ions in exchange for Na+ ions in response to electrochemical gradients (2). Due to its relatively low affinity for calcium, NCX1 most commonly functions to export Ca2+ under acute conditions of high intracellular Ca2+. Notably however, NCX1 is a reversible antiporter, and can thus facilate Ca2+ influx under specialized physiological circumstances (3). Research studies have shown that NCX1 is particularly important for regulating intracellular Ca2+ levels in excitatory cell types (e.g., neurons, cardiac muscle). For example, conditional knockout of NCX1 in mouse cardiac pacemaker cells identified a critical role for NCX1 in the initiation and maintenance of cardiac rhythm (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Tropomyosin-1 (TPM1) belongs to the high molecular weight members of tropomyosin family (1,2). The protein exists in an alpha-helical coiled-coil conformation and binds multiple acting monomers in a tight manner to stabilize and regulate the actin filament (3). Tropomyosins fullfill functions in muscle and non-muscle cells. In muscle cells, tropomyosins associate with the troponin complex and play a central role in the calcium-dependent regulation of striated muscle contraction in vertebrates. In non-muscle cells, tropomyosins are implicated in the formation and stabilization of cytoskeletal actin filaments to ensure normal cellular processes (1,2). Mutations of tropomysin-1 have been reported as a cause of dilated cardiac myopathies (4). Tropomyosin-1 also functions as a tumor suppressor, and many malignant tumors demonstrate downregulation of tropomyosin-1 expression (5-8). Tropomyosin-1 is phosphorylated at Ser283 through the Erk/DAPK pathway, which promotes stress fiber formation in response to oxidative stress (9-10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Tropomyosin-1 (TPM1) belongs to the high molecular weight members of tropomyosin family (1,2). The protein exists in an alpha-helical coiled-coil conformation and binds multiple acting monomers in a tight manner to stabilize and regulate the actin filament (3). Tropomyosins fullfill functions in muscle and non-muscle cells. In muscle cells, tropomyosins associate with the troponin complex and play a central role in the calcium-dependent regulation of striated muscle contraction in vertebrates. In non-muscle cells, tropomyosins are implicated in the formation and stabilization of cytoskeletal actin filaments to ensure normal cellular processes (1,2). Mutations of tropomysin-1 have been reported as a cause of dilated cardiac myopathies (4). Tropomyosin-1 also functions as a tumor suppressor, and many malignant tumors demonstrate downregulation of tropomyosin-1 expression (5-8). Tropomyosin-1 is phosphorylated at Ser283 through the Erk/DAPK pathway, which promotes stress fiber formation in response to oxidative stress (9-10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Troponin, working in conjunction with tropomyosin, functions as a molecular switch that regulates muscle contraction in response to changes in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Troponin consists of three subunits: the Ca2+-binding subunit troponin C (TnC), the tropomyosin-binding subunit troponin T (TnT), and the inhibitory subunit troponin I (TnI) (1). In response to β-adrenergic stimulation of the heart, Ser23 and Ser24 of TnI (cardiac) are phosphorylated by PKA and PKC. This phosphorylation stimulates a conformational change of the regulatory domain of TnC, reduces the association between TnI and TnC, and decreases myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity by reducing the Ca2+ binding affinity of TnC (1-3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: NKX2.5 is a member of the NKX homeobox transcription factor family. NKX2.5 plays an essential role in heart development and is among the earliest factors expressed in the cardiac lineage in developing embryos. Targeted disruption of the murine Nkx2.5 gene results in abnormal heart morphogenesis, severe growth retardation, and embryonic lethality around E9.5 (1,2). Mutations in NKX2.5 are likewise associated with several congenital heart conditions, such as atrial defect with atrioventricular conduction defects (ASD-AVCD) and Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) (3,4). Transcriptional activation of NKX2.5 is also associated with some B and T cell leukemias that result from chromosomal translocation (5-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The ATP2A2 (SERCA2) calcium pump is one of several sarcoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases responsible for regulating calcium transport across intracellular membranes (1). Multiple isoforms have been isolated, with ATP2A2a (SERCA2a) found predominantly in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle cells and ATP2A2b (SERCA2b) more ubiquitously expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum of most cell types (2). An isoform containing a truncated carboxy region (ATP2A2c) is expressed in epithelial and hematopoietic cell lines and may be involved in monocyte differentiation (3). Post-translational modification of ATP2A2 (SERCA2), including phosphorylation and tyrosine nitration, modify Ca2+ -ATPase activity and calcium transport (4,5). Mutation in the corresponding ATP2A2 (SERCA2) gene results in Darier disease, a skin disorder characterized by the presence of dark, keratotic papules or rash found on the head and torso (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Myosin is composed of six polypeptide chains: two identical heavy chains and two pairs of light chains. Myosin light chain 2 (MLC2), also known as myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC), RLC, or LC20, has many isoforms with varying tissue distribution. Smooth muscle MLC2 is phosphorylated at Thr18 and Ser19 by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner (1). These phosphorylation events are correlated with myosin ATPase activity and smooth muscle contraction (2). Striated muscle contraction is regulated by the troponin-tropomyosin complex in thin actin filaments and by binding of Ca2+ to troponin C (3). Two types of myosin light chain are expressed in the heart, with myosin light chain 2v (MYL2, MLC-2v) expression restricted to the ventricles and myosin light chain 2a (MYL7, MLC-2a) found specific to the atria. Mutations in the corresponding MYL2 gene are found in patients diagnosed with a form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy characterized by thickening of the mid-left ventricle.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phospholamban (PLN) was identified as a major phosphoprotein component of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) (1). Its name, "lamban", is derived from the greek word "lambano" meaning "to receive", so named due to the fact that phospholamban is heavily phosphorylated on serine and threonine residues in response to cardiac stimulation (1). Although originally thought to be a single 20-25 kDa protein due to its electrophoretic mobility on SDS-PAGE, PLN is actually a 52 amino acid, 6 kDa, membrane-spanning protein capable of forming stable homooligomers, even in the presence of SDS (2). Despite very high expression in cardiac tissue, phospholamban is also expressed in skeletal and smooth muscle (3). Localization of PLN is limited to the SR, where it serves as a regulator of the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase, SERCA (4). PLN binds directly to SERCA and effectively lowers its affinity for calcium, thus reducing calcium transport into the SR. Phosphorylation of PLN at Ser16 by Protein Kinase A or myotonic dystrophy protein kinase and/or phosphorylation at Thr17 by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase results in release of PLN from SERCA, relief of this inhibition, and increased calcium uptake by the SR (reviewed in 5,6). It has long been held that phosphorylation at Ser16 and Thr17 occurs sequentially, but increasing evidence suggests that phosphorylation, especially at Thr17, may be differentially regulated (reviewed in 7,8).Rodent models of heart failure have shown that the expression level and degree of phosphorylation of PLN are critical in modulating calcium flux and contractility (reviewed in 9-11). Deletion or decreased expression of PLN promotes increased calcium flux and increased cardiac contractility, whereas overexpression of PLN results in sequestration of SERCA, decreased calcium flux, reduced contractility, and rescue of cardiac dysfunction and failure in mouse models of hypertension and cardiomyopathy (reviewed in 10). Distinct mutations in PLN have been detected in humans, resulting either in decreased or no expression of PLN protein (12,13) or binding defects between PLN, SERCA and/or regulatory proteins (14,15), both of which result in cardiac myopathy and heart failure. Interestingly, while the human phenotype of most PLN defects mimic those seen in rodent and vice versa, there are some instances where the type and severity of cardiac disease resulting from PLN mutations in rodent and human differ, making a consensus mechanism elusive.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Actin, a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein, is the major component of the cytoskeleton. At least six isoforms are known in mammals. Nonmuscle β- and γ-actin, also known as cytoplasmic actin, are predominantly expressed in nonmuscle cells, controlling cell structure and motility (1). α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively; two smooth muscle actins, α- and γ-actin, are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1). Actin exists mainly as a fibrous polymer, F-actin. In response to cytoskeletal reorganizing signals during processes such as cytokinesis, endocytosis, or stress, cofilin promotes fragmentation and depolymerization of F-actin, resulting in an increase in the monomeric globular form, G-actin (2). The ARP2/3 complex stabilizes F-actin fragments and promotes formation of new actin filaments (2). Research studies have shown that actin is hyperphosphorylated in primary breast tumors (3). Cleavage of actin under apoptotic conditions has been observed in vitro and in cardiac and skeletal muscle, as shown in research studies (4-6). Actin cleavage by caspase-3 may accelerate ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent muscle proteolysis (6).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to the carbohydrate groups of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via its amine groups. The HRP conjugated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Pan-Actin (D18C11) Rabbit mAb #8456.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Actin, a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein, is the major component of the cytoskeleton. At least six isoforms are known in mammals. Nonmuscle β- and γ-actin, also known as cytoplasmic actin, are predominantly expressed in nonmuscle cells, controlling cell structure and motility (1). α-cardiac and α-skeletal actin are expressed in striated cardiac and skeletal muscles, respectively; two smooth muscle actins, α- and γ-actin, are found primarily in vascular smooth muscle and enteric smooth muscle, respectively. These actin isoforms regulate the contractile potential of muscle cells (1). Actin exists mainly as a fibrous polymer, F-actin. In response to cytoskeletal reorganizing signals during processes such as cytokinesis, endocytosis, or stress, cofilin promotes fragmentation and depolymerization of F-actin, resulting in an increase in the monomeric globular form, G-actin (2). The ARP2/3 complex stabilizes F-actin fragments and promotes formation of new actin filaments (2). Research studies have shown that actin is hyperphosphorylated in primary breast tumors (3). Cleavage of actin under apoptotic conditions has been observed in vitro and in cardiac and skeletal muscle, as shown in research studies (4-6). Actin cleavage by caspase-3 may accelerate ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent muscle proteolysis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) catalyzes the formation of nitric oxide (NO) and citruline from L-arginine, oxygen and cofactors. Three family members have been characterized: neuronal NOS (nNOS), which is found primarily in neuronal tissue; inducible NOS (iNOS), which is induced by interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharides in the kidney and cardiovascular system; and endothelial NOS (eNOS), which is expressed in blood vessels (1). NO is a messenger molecule with diverse functions throughout the body including the maintenance of vascular integrity, homeostasis, synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation, learning, and memory (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) catalyzes the formation of nitric oxide (NO) and citruline from L-arginine, oxygen and cofactors. Three family members have been characterized: neuronal NOS (nNOS), which is found primarily in neuronal tissue; inducible NOS (iNOS), which is induced by interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharides in the kidney and cardiovascular system; and endothelial NOS (eNOS), which is expressed in blood vessels (1). NO is a messenger molecule with diverse functions throughout the body including the maintenance of vascular integrity, homeostasis, synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation, learning, and memory (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CaMKII is an important member of the calcium/calmodulin-activated protein kinase family, functioning in neural synaptic stimulation and T cell receptor signaling (1,2). CaMKII has catalytic and regulatory domains. Ca2+/calmodulin binding to the CaMKII regulatory domain relieves autoinhibition and activates the kinase (3). The activated CaMKII further autophosphorylates at Thr286 to render the kinase constitutively active (3). The threonine phosphorylation state of CaMKII can be regulated through PP1/PKA. PP1 (protein phosphatase 1) dephosphorylates phospho-CaMKII at Thr286. PKA (protein kinase A) prevents phospho-CaMKII (Thr286) dephosphorylation through an inhibitory effect on PP1 (4).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished and expressed in particular cell types: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein or GFAP (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin) and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined relative to other markers to distinguish between the two forms of neoplasm (3). Desmin is a myogenic marker expressed in early development that forms a network of filaments that extends across the myofibril and surrounds Z discs. The desmin cytoskeleton provides a connection among myofibrils, organelles and the cytoskeleton (4). Desmin knockout mice develop cardiomyopathy, skeletal and smooth muscle defects (5). In humans, desmin related myopathies might be caused by mutations in the corresponding desmin gene or in proteins with which desmin interacts, including αB-crystallin and synemin. Disorganized desmin filaments and the accumulation of protein aggregates comprised predominantly of desmin characterize desmin-related myopathies (reviewed in 6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: There are four major Adrenergic Receptor (AR) subtypes (α1, α2, β1, β2). Each of the subtypes has been classified by their unique responses to agonists and antagonists. Adrenergic receptors belong to the family of guanine nucleotide-binding, regulatory protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) which transverse the plasma membrane seven times. The transmembrane regions are hydrophobic and are interconnected by hydrophilic loops (1). β2-Adrenergic Receptor (β2AR) is the most studied receptor of the catecholamine system. β2AR stimulation occurs through the catecholamines epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline) acting as neuromodulators in the central nervous system and as hormones in the vascular system. β2AR activation results in coupling to heterotrimeric G proteins and activation of the second messengers cAMP and phosphatidylinositol, ultimately leading to changes in cellular physiology. GPCR kinases (GRKs) terminate β2AR signaling through phosphorylation of the GPCR and by recruiting β-arrestin. β-arrestin binding uncouples the receptor from the G protein, thereby terminating G protein–mediated signaling (desensitization), and initiating clathrin-mediated endocytosis (internalization) of β2AR (2). β-adrenergic blocking agents (beta blockers) are drugs that block catecholamines from binding to βAR and are prescribed for cardiac arrhythmias, cardioprotection after myocardial infarction (heart attack), and hypertension (3).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CaMKII is an important member of the calcium/calmodulin-activated protein kinase family, functioning in neural synaptic stimulation and T cell receptor signaling (1,2). CaMKII has catalytic and regulatory domains. Ca2+/calmodulin binding to the CaMKII regulatory domain relieves autoinhibition and activates the kinase (3). The activated CaMKII further autophosphorylates at Thr286 to render the kinase constitutively active (3). The threonine phosphorylation state of CaMKII can be regulated through PP1/PKA. PP1 (protein phosphatase 1) dephosphorylates phospho-CaMKII at Thr286. PKA (protein kinase A) prevents phospho-CaMKII (Thr286) dephosphorylation through an inhibitory effect on PP1 (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter dopamine and other catecholamines. TH functions as a tetramer, with each subunit composed of a regulatory and catalytic domain, and exists in several different isoforms (1,2). This enzyme is required for embryonic development since TH knockout mice die before or at birth (3). Levels of transcription, translation and posttranslational modification regulate TH activity. The amino-terminal regulatory domain contains three serine residues: Ser9, Ser31 and Ser40. Phosphorylation at Ser40 by PKA positively regulates the catalytic activity of TH (4-6). Phosphorylation at Ser31 by CDK5 also increases the catalytic activity of TH through stabilization of TH protein levels (7-9).