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Monoclonal Antibody Western Blotting Heat Shock Protein Binding

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: HSP70 and HSP90 are molecular chaperones expressed constitutively under normal conditions to maintain protein homeostasis and are induced upon environmental stress (1). Both HSP70 and HSP90 are able to interact with unfolded proteins to prevent irreversible aggregation and catalyze the refolding of their substrates in an ATP- and co-chaperone-dependent manner (1). HSP70 has a broad range of substrates including newly synthesized and denatured proteins, while HSP90 tends to have a more limited subset of substrates, most of which are signaling molecules. HSP70 and HSP90 often function collaboratively in a multi-chaperone system, which requires a minimal set of co-chaperones: HSP40, Hop, and p23 (2,3). The co-chaperones either regulate the intrinsic ATPase activity of the chaperones or recruit chaperones to specific substrates or subcellular compartments (1,4). When the ubiquitin ligase CHIP associates with the HSP70/HSP90 complex as a cofactor, the unfolded substrates are subjected to degradation by the proteasome (4). The biological functions of HSP70/HSP90 extend beyond their chaperone activity. They are essential for the maturation and inactivation of nuclear hormones and other signaling molecules (1,3). They also play a role in vesicle formation and protein trafficking (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: HSPA8, alternately known as HSC70 or HSP73, is a constitutively expressed member of the HSP70 superfamily (1). Although its primary role in cells appears to be that of a general chaperone for unfolded proteins, HSPA8 has also been identified as the uncoating ATPase responsible for removing clathrin from coated vesicles and may also play a role in stabilizing untranslated mRNAs (1-5). In addition to these "housekeeping" functions, HSPA8 may also have an important role in inducible cellular stress responses. For example, oxidative or thermal stress promotes the nuclear/nucleolar accumulation of HSPA8, where it forms a complex with the topoisomerase I complex and likely protects it from heat inactivation (6,7). HSPA8 is reportedly phosphorylated in response to DNA damage, but it remains unclear what effect, if any, this has on HSPA8 function (8-10). Numerous high throughput studies support this observation. For more information, please see the HSPA8 page in PhosphoSitePlus® at www.phosphosite.org.

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: HSP70 and HSP90 are molecular chaperones expressed constitutively under normal conditions to maintain protein homeostasis and are induced upon environmental stress (1). Both HSP70 and HSP90 are able to interact with unfolded proteins to prevent irreversible aggregation and catalyze the refolding of their substrates in an ATP- and co-chaperone-dependent manner (1). HSP70 has a broad range of substrates including newly synthesized and denatured proteins, while HSP90 tends to have a more limited subset of substrates, most of which are signaling molecules. HSP70 and HSP90 often function collaboratively in a multi-chaperone system, which requires a minimal set of co-chaperones: HSP40, Hop, and p23 (2,3). The co-chaperones either regulate the intrinsic ATPase activity of the chaperones or recruit chaperones to specific substrates or subcellular compartments (1,4). When the ubiquitin ligase CHIP associates with the HSP70/HSP90 complex as a cofactor, the unfolded substrates are subjected to degradation by the proteasome (4). The biological functions of HSP70/HSP90 extend beyond their chaperone activity. They are essential for the maturation and inactivation of nuclear hormones and other signaling molecules (1,3). They also play a role in vesicle formation and protein trafficking (2).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Grp75, also known as mortalin, is a member of Hsp70 family of chaperone proteins that is not heat-inducible (1,2). This protein is essential for transporting many mitochondrial proteins from the cytoplasm to mitochondria (3). Grp75 inactivates the tumor suppressor p53 (4). Studies found that Grp75 is overexpressed in many tumor tissues and immortalized human cell lines, suggesting its role in the tumor formation (5). Grp75 is also implicated in cell aging, as its overexpression appears to prolong the life span of human fibroblasts (6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex is a rate-regulating enzyme in the Krebs Cycle (1). Dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase (DLST) is a key subunit in this complex (2). Reduction of DLST increases reactive oxygen species production, suggesting its role in oxidative stress (2). Research has shown that deficiency of DLST in mice is linked to increased oxidative stress in mitochondria, a process that may be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex is a rate-regulating enzyme in the Krebs Cycle (1). Dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase (DLST) is a key subunit in this complex (2). Reduction of DLST increases reactive oxygen species production, suggesting its role in oxidative stress (2). Research has shown that deficiency of DLST in mice is linked to increased oxidative stress in mitochondria, a process that may be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TFAM (Transcription Factor A, Mitochondrial; aka TCF6) is a member of the high-mobility group (HMG) proteins because it contains two HMG boxes. TFAM is a transcription factor for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and enhances mtDNA transcription in a promoter-specific fashion in the presence of mitochondrial RNA polymerase and transcription factor B (1). Because the majority of ATP production depends on the mitochondrial respiratory chain, maintenance of the mitochondrial genome is critical for normal health. TFAM plays an essential role in the maintenance of mtDNA and thus, ATP production (2). TFAM binds to mtDNA both nonspecifically and in a sequence-specific manner. It is known to have a dual effect on mtDNA: protection of mtDNA and initiation of transcription from mtDNA (3). TFAM attenuates age-dependent impairment of the brain by preventing oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in microglia (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (OGDH) is one of three enzymes in the α ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDC) that is responsible for catalyzing a rate-regulating step of the tricarboxylic acid (Krebs) cycle. Together with dihydrolipoamide S-succinyltransferase (DLST) and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD), OGDH helps to convert 2-oxoglutarate to succinyl-CoA and CO2 within eukaryotic mitochondria (1). Regulation of this enzyme complex is important for mitochondrial energy metabolism within cells (2). Research studies indicate that OGDH activity within the mitochondrial matrix is regulated by multiple factors, including calcium, the adenine nucleotides ATP and ADP, and NADH (2).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cofilin is a conserved actin-severing protein required for processes that rely on actin dynamics, including cytokinesis and cell motility (reviewed in 1). Regulation of actin dynamics requires the controlled cycling between the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of cofilin (2). The severing activity of cofilin is inhibited by LIMK or TESK phosphorylation at the conserved amino-terminal Ser3 of cofilin (3,4). Slingshot (SSH) phosphatase, for which there have been three mammalian isoforms identified, dephosphorylates cofilin in vivo (5). Chronophin (CIN, PDXP) is a haloacid dehalogenase phosphatase that also dephosphorylates cofilin. Alteration of CIN activity through overexpression of either the wildtype or phosphatase-inactive mutant CIN interferes with actin dynamics, cell morphology and cytokinesis (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Human Tid-1 is a human orthologue of the Drosophila tumor suppressor lethal (2) tumorous imaginal discs, l (2) tid and is a member of the DnaJ family of proteins that serve as co-chaperones to Hsp70 proteins (1). These proteins are characterized by a J domain, a highly conserved tetrahelical domain that binds to Hsp70 chaperones and activates their ATPase activity. Hsp70 and their associated chaperones mediate a variety of activities including the folding of newly synthesized polypeptides, the translocation of proteins across membranes and assembly of multimeric protein complexes. Two alternatively spliced variants exist for human Tid-1 ,designated hTID-1s and hTID-1L, both which contain the J domain, localize to the mitochondrial matrix, and co-immunoprecipitate with Hsp70. Expression of Tid-1L increases apoptosis induced by the DNA damaging agent mitomycin c (MMC) and by TNF-alpha, and that activity is dependent on its J domain. In contrast, expression of Tid-1S reduces apoptosis by these agents. Tid-1 orthologues are also found in mouse (mTid-1) and rat (rTid-1) (2,3). The mouse orthologue was originally identified though its interaction with p120 GTPase-activating protein (GAP), raising the possiblity that Tid-1 helps regulates the confirmation, activity, or subcellular localization of GAP (3).

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated IκBα (L35A5) Mouse mAb (Amino-terminal Antigen) #4814.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The NF-κB/Rel transcription factors are present in the cytosol in an inactive state complexed with the inhibitory IκB proteins (1-3). Activation occurs via phosphorylation of IκBα at Ser32 and Ser36 followed by proteasome-mediated degradation that results in the release and nuclear translocation of active NF-κB (3-7). IκBα phosphorylation and resulting Rel-dependent transcription are activated by a highly diverse group of extracellular signals including inflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and chemokines. Kinases that phosphorylate IκB at these activating sites have been identified (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The NF-κB/Rel transcription factors are present in the cytosol in an inactive state complexed with the inhibitory IκB proteins (1-3). Activation occurs via phosphorylation of IκBα at Ser32 and Ser36 followed by proteasome-mediated degradation that results in the release and nuclear translocation of active NF-κB (3-7). IκBα phosphorylation and resulting Rel-dependent transcription are activated by a highly diverse group of extracellular signals including inflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and chemokines. Kinases that phosphorylate IκB at these activating sites have been identified (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: GPR37 is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that was originally identified as an orphan receptor highly expressed in the brain and testis (1). It shares significant homology with the receptors of endothelin and bombesin peptides (1). Neuropeptide head activator from the invertebrate Hydra was identified as a high-affinity ligand of GPR37 (2), however, to date, no mammalian ortholog of this peptide that could represent an endogenous GPR37 ligand has been identified. Recently, GPR37 was deorphanized as the receptor for the endogenous peptides prosaptide and prosaposin (3). GPR37 is a substrate of the E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin, and is often referred to as “parkin-associated endothelin-like receptor,” or “Pael-R” (4). GPR37 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s Disease as it aggregates in the substantia nigra of some PD patients (4,5). Interestingly, prosaposin exerts neuroprotective, neurotrophic, and gliotrophic actions (6), and GPR37 was identified as a negative regulator of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination (7), suggesting that it could represent a potential target for demyelinating pathologies.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor-associated kinase (IRAK) is a serine/threonine-specific kinase that can be coprecipitated in an IL-1-inducible manner with the IL-1 receptor (1). The mammalian family of IRAK molecules contains four members (IRAK1, IRAK2, IRAK3/IRAK-M, and IRAK4). The binding of IL-1 to IL-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) initiates the formation of a complex that includes IL-1RI, AcP, MyD88, and IRAKs (2). IRAK undergoes autophosphorylation shortly after IL-1 stimulation. The subsequent events involve IRAK dissociation from the IL-1RI complex, its ubiquitination, and its association with two membrane-bound proteins: TAB2 and TRAF6. The resulting IRAK-TRAF6-TAB2 complex is then released into the cytoplasm where it activates protein kinase cascades, including TAK1, IKKs, and the stress-activated kinases (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Apoptotic protease activating factor 1 (Apaf-1), originally identified as the mammalian homolog of the C. elegans apoptotic regulatory protein CED-4, is an important signaling protein involved in the activation of caspase-9 during apoptosis (1). Cytosolic Apaf-1 forms a complex with caspase-9 in the presence of cytochrome c and dATP, ultimately leading to caspase-9 activation and subsequent activation of caspase-3 (2,3). The protein contains an amino-terminal CARD domain, a central CED-4 homology domain, and multiple WD-40 repeats at the carboxy-terminus. Several isoforms of Apaf-1 are expressed through alternative splicing generating a small insert following the CARD domain as well as an extra WD-40 repeat (4). Apaf-1 knock-out mice display widespread defects in apoptosis and resistance to a variety of apoptotic stimuli (5,6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apoptotic protease activating factor 1 (Apaf-1), originally identified as the mammalian homolog of the C. elegans apoptotic regulatory protein CED-4, is an important signaling protein involved in the activation of caspase-9 during apoptosis (1). Cytosolic Apaf-1 forms a complex with caspase-9 in the presence of cytochrome c and dATP, ultimately leading to caspase-9 activation and subsequent activation of caspase-3 (2,3). The protein contains an amino-terminal CARD domain, a central CED-4 homology domain, and multiple WD-40 repeats at the carboxy-terminus. Several isoforms of Apaf-1 are expressed through alternative splicing generating a small insert following the CARD domain as well as an extra WD-40 repeat (4). Apaf-1 knock-out mice display widespread defects in apoptosis and resistance to a variety of apoptotic stimuli (5,6).