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Monoclonal Antibody Western Blotting Helicase Activity

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding domain (CHD) proteins have been identified in a variety of organisms (1,2). This family of proteins, which consists of nine members, has been divided into three separate subfamilies: subfamily I (CHD1 and CHD2), subfamily II (CHD3 and CHD4), and subfamily III (CHD5, CHD6, CHD7, CHD8, and CHD9). All of the CHD proteins contain two tandem N-terminal chromodomains, a SWI/SNF-related ATPase domain, and a C-terminal DNA binding domain (1,2). The chromodomains facilitate binding to methylated lysine residues of histone proteins and confer interactions with specific regions of chromatin. The SWI/SNF-related ATPase domain utilizes the energy from ATP hydrolysis to modify chromatin structure. CHD1 is a euchromatic protein that associates with the promoters of active genes, and is required for the maintenance of open chromatin and pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (3-6). The two chromodomains of CHD1 facilitate its recruitment to active genes by binding to methyl-lysine 4 of histone H3, a mark associated with transcriptional activation (4-6). Yeast CHD1 is a component of the SAGA and SLIK histone acetyltransferase complexes, and is believed to link histone methylation with histone acetylation during transcriptional activation (6). The CHD2 protein is not well characterized; however, mouse knockout studies suggest important functions in development and tumor suppression. Homozygous CHD2 knockout mice exhibit delayed growth and perinatal lethality (7). Heterozygous knockout mice show increased mortality and gross organ abnormalities, in addition to increased extramedullary hematopoiesis and susceptibility to lymphomas (7,8). CHD2 mutant cells are defective in hematopoietic stem cell differentiation and exhibit aberrant DNA damage responses (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The RecQ family is a group of DNA helicases that play an important role in global genomic stability (1). Mutations in three of the five known human RecQ proteins (BLM, WRN and RECQL4) give rise to clinically distinct disorders that are characterized by features such as premature aging and predisposition to cancer (2,3). The clinical distinction of each disease associated with these mutations points to distinct roles that members of this helicase family play in DNA metabolism. RecQL1 is the most abundant protein of the RecQ family and was the first family member to be discovered. No disease associations have been reported with RecQL1 and its biological activities are not well understood (4). It has recently been shown that depletion of RecQL1 negatively affects genomic maintenance and cellular proliferation – which may point to a role in DNA damage repair and cell cycle progression (5,6). Upregulation of RecQL1 along with other RecQ family members has been reported in cells in response to oncogenic viral infection (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Antiviral innate immunity depends on the combination of parallel pathways triggered by virus detecting proteins in the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family and RNA helicases, such as Rig-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene I) and MDA-5 (melanoma differentiation-associated antigen 5), which promote the transcription of type I interferons (IFN) and antiviral enzymes (1-3). TLRs and helicase proteins contain sites that recognize the molecular patterns of different virus types, including DNA, single-stranded RNA (ssRNA), double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), and glycoproteins. These antiviral proteins are found in different cell compartments; TLRs (i.e. TLR3, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9) are expressed on endosomal membranes and helicases are localized to the cytoplasm. Rig-I expression is induced by retinoic acid, LPS, IFN, and viral infection (4,5). Both Rig-I and MDA-5 share a DExD/H-box helicase domain that detects viral dsRNA and two amino-terminal caspase recruitment domains (CARD) that are required for triggering downstream signaling (4-7). Rig-I binds both dsRNA and viral ssRNA that contains a 5'-triphosphate end not seen in host RNA (8,9). Though structurally related, Rig-I and MDA-5 detect a distinct set of viruses (10,11). The CARD domain of the helicases, which is sufficient to generate signaling and IFN production, is recruited to the CARD domain of the MAVS/VISA/Cardif/IPS-1 mitochondrial protein, which triggers activation of NF-κB, TBK1/IKKε, and IRF-3/IRF-7 (12-15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CHD7 belongs to the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding (CHD) family of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling proteins (1). The CHD family of proteins has been shown to play an important role in regulating gene expression by altering the chromatin structure at target genes (1,2). The nine members of the CHD family are characterized by the presence of two tandem chromodomains in the N-terminal region and an SNF2-like ATPase domain near the central region of the protein (2-4). The CHD proteins can be further divided into three subgroups based on the presence of additional conserved functional domains. CHD7 belongs to the third subgroup of CHD proteins together with CHD6, 8, and 9, which are distinguished by the presence of three conserved region (CR) domains, a switching-defective protein 3, adaptor 2, nuclear receptor co-repressor, transcription factor IIB (SANT) like domain, two brahma and kismet (BRK) domains, and a DNA binding domain (2). CHD7 regulates embryonic stem cell (ESC) specific gene expression together with ESC master regulators Oct-4, Sox2 and nanog, and is necessary for neural stem cell development and formation of the neural crest (5-7). Research studies have shown that CHD7 mutations are frequently found in patients with CHARGE syndrome (coloboma of the eye, heart defects, atresia of the choanae, retardation of growth/development, genital/urinary abnormalities, and ear abnormalities and deafness) (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding domain (CHD) proteins have been identified in a variety of organisms (1,2). This family of nine proteins is divided into three separate subfamilies: subfamily I (CHD1 and CHD2), subfamily II (CHD3 and CHD4), and subfamily III (CHD5, CHD6, CHD7, CHD8, and CHD9). All CHD proteins contain two tandem amino-terminal chromodomains, a SWI/SNF-related ATPase domain, and a carboxy-terminal DNA-binding domain (1,2). The chromodomains facilitate binding to methylated lysine residues of histone proteins and confer interactions with specific regions of chromatin. The SWI/SNF-related ATPase domain utilizes energy from ATP hydrolysis to modify chromatin structure. CHD proteins are often found in large, multiprotein complexes with their transcriptional activation or repression activity governed by other proteins within the complex. CHD3 (also known as Mi2-α) and CHD4 (also known as Mi2-β) are central components of the nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) transcriptional repressor complex, which also contains HDAC1, HDAC2, RBAP48, RBAP46, MTA1, MTA2, MTA3, and MBD3 (3-8). Both CHD3 and CHD4 contain two plant homeodomain (PHD) zinc finger domains that bind directly to HDAC1 and HDAC2.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CHD5 (chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding-5) is one of the 9 known CHD proteins and is homologous to its family members, CHD3 and CHD4 (1-3). CHD5 interacts with the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylation (NuRD) complex (1,4). CHD5 is characterized by two PHD domains, two chromo domains, a SNF2-like helicase/ATPase domain, as well as a conserved coiled-coil motif in the C-terminal region (1). CHD5 binds to the N-terminus of Histone H3 via its PHD domains (1). CHD5 was first characterized as a tumor suppressor gene found to be frequently lost in neuroblastomas (1). Since its initial discovery, CHD5 has been studied extensively and has been implicated in numerous other cancers including gliomas, breast, lung, ovarian, and prostate cancers as well as in laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas and gallbladder carcinoma (1). CHD5 is thought to be a prognostic marker in neuroblastoma patients. High CHD5 levels are strongly correlated with favorable clinical outcomes, whereas low or absent expression is associated with MYCN amplification and poor outcomes (1). In addition, CHD5 has a dual function in neurogenesis, playing a transcription activating role in neurogenesis, while interacting with the Polycomb group proteins to repress genes encoding regulators of other lineages. Deletion of CHD5 also inhibits neuronal differentiation leading to the accumulation of undifferentiated progenitors (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) are toxic DNA lesions caused by environmental agents as well as some chemotherapeutic drugs. These lesions are repaired via multiple DNA repair pathways. HELQ (also known as HEL308) is a 3’-5’ DNA helicase that colocalizes with stalled DNA replication forks in response to DNA damage, and contributes to the repair of ICL lesions through ATR signaling (1,2). HELQ interacts with various DNA repair proteins, including FANCD2, RAD51, RAD51 paralogs, and ATR (1-3). HELQ-deficient mice exhibit reduced fertility as well as interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair defects, and are prone to tumors (3).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DDX5 (DEAD box polypeptide 5), also known as p68, was first identified as a 68 kDa nuclear protein with similarity to translation initiation factor eIF-4A (1). DDX5 is a member of the DEAD box family of putative RNA helicases, defined by the presence of a conserved DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) motif that appears to function primarily in the regulation of RNA secondary structure. DDX5 exhibits ATP-dependent RNA helicase activity (2) and has been identified as a critical subunit of the DROSHA complex that regulates miRNA and rRNA processing (3,4). DDX may also regulate mRNA splicing (5) and has been shown to interact with HDAC1, where it can regulate promoter-specific transcription (6). DDX5 interacts with a diverse group of proteins, including Runx2, p53, Smad3, CBP, and p300 (7-10), suggesting an important role for DDX5 in a multitude of developmental processes. Notably, DDX5 may be involved in growth factor-induced epithelial mesechymal transition (EMT). Phosphorylation of DDX5 at Tyr593 following PDGF stimulation was shown to displace Axin from β-catenin; this prevented phosphorylation of β-catenin by GSK-3β, leading to Wnt-independent nuclear translocation of β-catenin (11) and increased transcription of c-Myc, cyclin D1, and Snai1 (12,13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding domain (CHD) proteins have been identified in a variety of organisms (1,2). This family of nine proteins is divided into three separate subfamilies: subfamily I (CHD1 and CHD2), subfamily II (CHD3 and CHD4), and subfamily III (CHD5, CHD6, CHD7, CHD8, and CHD9). All CHD proteins contain two tandem amino-terminal chromodomains, a SWI/SNF-related ATPase domain, and a carboxy-terminal DNA-binding domain (1,2). The chromodomains facilitate binding to methylated lysine residues of histone proteins and confer interactions with specific regions of chromatin. The SWI/SNF-related ATPase domain utilizes energy from ATP hydrolysis to modify chromatin structure. CHD proteins are often found in large, multiprotein complexes with their transcriptional activation or repression activity governed by other proteins within the complex. CHD3 (also known as Mi2-α) and CHD4 (also known as Mi2-β) are central components of the nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) transcriptional repressor complex, which also contains HDAC1, HDAC2, RBAP48, RBAP46, MTA1, MTA2, MTA3, and MBD3 (3-8). Both CHD3 and CHD4 contain two plant homeodomain (PHD) zinc finger domains that bind directly to HDAC1 and HDAC2.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: α-thalassemia/mental retardation X-linked (ATRX) is transcriptional regulator and helicase that belongs to the SNF2 family of chromatin remodeling proteins (1,2). Together with its binding partner death-associated protein 6 (DAXX), ATRX acts as histone chaperone to deposit histone variant H3.3 at repetitive DNA sequences such as telomeric, pericentric, and ribosomal gene repeats (3-6). ATRX is involved in many nuclear functions that ensure proper sister chromatid cohesion during mitosis and chromosome alignment during meiosis (7,8). The ATRX transcriptional regulator also plays a role in the maintenance of telomere integrity and the regulation of gene expression during mammalian development by influencing DNA methylation patterns at high DNA repeat sequences (9,10). Mutations in the corresponding ATRX gene results in ATR-X syndrome, an X-linked disorder characterized by intellectual disabilities, craniofacial abnormalities, and mild α-thalassemia (11,12). Research studies indicate that the loss of ATRX protein occurs in numerous cancers, including pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) and pediatric glioblastoma, where telomere maintenance occurs independently of telomerase (13-16).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: A variety of factors contribute to the important biological event of initiation of translation. The eIF4F complex of translation initiation factors binds to the 5' m7 GTP cap to open up the mRNA secondary structure and allow small ribosome subunit binding (1). eIF4A, an eIF4 complex component that acts as an ATP-dependent RNA helicase, unwinds the secondary structure of the 5' mRNA untranslated region to mediate ribosome binding (2,3). In addition, eIF4A has recently been shown to repress Dpp/BMP signalling in a translation-independent manner in Drosophila (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: DDX6, also known as RCK and p54, was identified as a proto-oncogene product and is a member of the ATP-dependent DEAD box helicase family (1,2). This protein interacts with translation initiation factor eIF4E in the cytoplasmic P-bodies (3) and represses mRNA translation (4). DDX6 is a component of the miRNA induced silencing complex (miRISC) and interacts with Argonaute 1 (Ago1) and Argonaute 2 (Ago2) proteins in vitro and in vivo (5), functioning in miRNA-mediated translational repression (5). Depletion of DDX6 leads to the disruption of cytoplasmic P-bodies indicating that it is required for P-body formation (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CHD8 belongs to the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding (CHD) family of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling proteins (1). The CHD family of proteins has been shown to play an important role in regulating gene expression by utilizing the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to alter chromatin architecture (1,2). The nine CHD family members are characterized by the presence of two tandem chromodomains in the N-terminal region and an SNF2-like ATPase domain near the central region of the protein (2-4). In addition, CHD8 contains three CR (conserved region) domains, a SANT (switching-defective protein 3, adaptor 2, nuclear receptor co-repressor, transcription factor IIB)-like domain, two BRK (brahma and kismet) domains, and a DNA-binding domain (2). The chromatin remodeling activity of CHD8 has been shown to be important for the regulation of a wide variety of genes, such as the HOX genes (5) and genes that are driven by β-catenin (6), p53 (7), estrogen receptor (8), or androgen receptor (9). CHD8 can also interact with the insulator binding protein CTCF and is required for CTCF insulator activity at multiple gene loci (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Antiviral innate immunity depends on the combination of parallel pathways triggered by virus detecting proteins in the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family and RNA helicases, such as Rig-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene I) and MDA-5 (melanoma differentiation-associated antigen 5), which promote the transcription of type I interferons (IFN) and antiviral enzymes (1-3). TLRs and helicase proteins contain sites that recognize the molecular patterns of different virus types, including DNA, single-stranded RNA (ssRNA), double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), and glycoproteins. These antiviral proteins are found in different cell compartments; TLRs (i.e. TLR3, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9) are expressed on endosomal membranes and helicases are localized to the cytoplasm. Rig-I expression is induced by retinoic acid, LPS, IFN, and viral infection (4,5). Both Rig-I and MDA-5 share a DExD/H-box helicase domain that detects viral dsRNA and two amino-terminal caspase recruitment domains (CARD) that are required for triggering downstream signaling (4-7). Rig-I binds both dsRNA and viral ssRNA that contains a 5'-triphosphate end not seen in host RNA (8,9). Though structurally related, Rig-I and MDA-5 detect a distinct set of viruses (10,11). The CARD domain of the helicases, which is sufficient to generate signaling and IFN production, is recruited to the CARD domain of the MAVS/VISA/Cardif/IPS-1 mitochondrial protein, which triggers activation of NF-κB, TBK1/IKKε, and IRF-3/IRF-7 (12-15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ku is a heterodimeric protein composed of two subunits (Ku70 and Ku80) originally identified by researchers as autoantigens associated with several autoimmune diseases including scleroderma, polymyositis, and systemic lupus erythematosus (1). Ku is an abundant, ubiquitously expressed nuclear protein that binds to and stabilizes the ends of DNA at telomeres or double-stranded DNA breaks (2-5). The Ku70/Ku80 heterodimer has ATP-dependent DNA helicase activity and functions as the DNA-binding regulatory component of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (6-8). The assembly of the DNA-PK complex at DNA ends is required for nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), one mechanism involved in double-stranded DNA break repair and V(D)J recombination (8). DNA-PK has been shown to phosphorylate many proteins, including p53, serum response factor, c-Jun, c-Fos, c-Myc, Oct-1, Sp-1, and RNA polymerase II (1,8). The combined activities of Ku70/Ku80 and DNA-PK implicate Ku in many cellular functions, including cell cycle regulation, DNA replication and repair, telomere maintenance, recombination, and transcriptional activation.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The RecQ family of DNA and RNA helicases is a family of enzymes that has been shown to be important to genome integrity (1). Members of this family function in several DNA repair processes including double strand break repair, homologous recombination, and re-initiation of DNA replication at stalled replication forks (2,3). Mutations in RecQ helicase family members results in syndromes that display varying types of chromosomal abnormalities and overall genomic instability (1). WRN is a member of the RecQ family that has been identified as the gene underlying Werner’s syndrome; an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by premature aging and predisposition to cancer (4). Cells from Werner’s Syndrome patients exhibit genomic instability that is associated with deficient DNA repair activity (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The RecQ family is a group of DNA helicases that play an important role in global genomic stability (1). Mutations in three of the five known human RecQ proteins (BLM, WRN, and RECQL4) give rise to clinically distinct disorders that are characterized by features such as premature aging and predisposition to cancer (2,3). The clinical distinction of each disease associated with these mutations points to distinct roles that members of this helicase family play in DNA metabolism. The RecQL5 helicase has not yet been associated with any human disease, but RecQL5 -/- mice exhibit an increased incidence of cancer (4,5). It has recently been shown that RecQL5 protects genome stability through two parallel mechanims: helicase action and interaction with the initiation form of RNA Polymerase II (6). It has also been shown that RecQL5 -/- mouse embryonic stem cells display an elevated frequency of sister chromatic exchange (SCE), suggesting a role in suppression of homologous recombination and/or crossover events (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Upf1 was identified as an active component in nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), an mRNA surveillance mechanism in eukaryotic cells that degrades mRNAs containing premature termination codons (1). Upf1 was found to be an ATP-dependent RNA helicase in the cytoplasm (2) and was later shown to be a component of cytoplasmic P-bodies (3). Upf1 phosphorylation mediates the repression of translation that accompanies NMD, allowing mRNA accessibility to the NMD machinery (4). Two other active components of NMD, Upf2 and Upf3, were also identified and described as having perinuclear and nucleocytoplasmic localization, respectively (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PICH is a helicase of the SNF2 family of ATPases and is essential for proper chromosome segregation during mitosis (1). While PICH was originally proposed to participate in spindle assembly checkpoint signaling (1), that function was subsequently called into question (2). When phosphorylated at Thr1063 by CDK1, PICH binds the polo-box domain of the mitotic kinase PLK1 (1) and targets it to chromosome arms (3), where it appears to facilitate proper chromosome arm cohesion (4). PICH is also a substrate of PLK1 (1). Localized to the cytoplasm during interphase, PICH begins to accumulate at centromeres and kinetochores in prometaphase (4). As chromosomes begin to separate at the onset of anaphase, PICH associates with ultrafine threads between sister centromeres thought to be composed of entangled DNA (5), a natural consequence of DNA replication. PICH is proposed to cooperate with BLM, a RecQ-like helicase implicated in the genetic disorder Bloom’s Syndrome, to displace centromeric histones along these threads, thus enabling them to span large distances without breaking (6). This provides a temporal window for topoisomerase IIα-mediated disentanglement (7). Defects in PICH or BLM disrupt proper chromatid segregation and result in the formation of micronuclei (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The DEAD box helicase DDX41 is an antiviral protein that senses cytosolic DNA and activates the signaling adaptor STING to induce type I interferon production (1).  The recognition of bacterial dinucleotides by DDX41 also leads to STING-dependent type 1 interferon production (2).  Research studies demonstrate that knockdown of DDX41 attenuates poly(dA:dT)-induced IFN-β production and cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS, MB21D1) induction (3). The DDX41 protein is thought to be an initial constitutively expressed DNA sensor that activates type I interferon production and leads to cGAS amplification of type I interferon production (3). DDX41 is negatively regulated by the E3 ligase TRIM21 (4). Both germline and somatic mutations in the corresponding DDX41 gene are associated with myeloid neoplasms (5,6).