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Monoclonal Antibody Western Blotting Inflammatory Response

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TNF-α, the prototypical member of the TNF protein superfamily, is a homotrimeric type-II membrane protein (1,2). Membrane-bound TNF-α is cleaved by the metalloprotease TACE/ADAM17 to generate a soluble homotrimer (2). Both membrane and soluble forms of TNF-α are biologically active. TNF-α is produced by a variety of immune cells including T cells, B cells, NK cells, and macrophages (1). Cellular response to TNF-α is mediated through interaction with receptors TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 and results in activation of pathways that favor both cell survival and apoptosis depending on the cell type and biological context. Activation of kinase pathways (including JNK, Erk1/2, p38 MAPK, and NF-κB) promotes the survival of cells, while TNF-α-mediated activation of caspase-8 leads to programmed cell death (1,2). TNF-α plays a key regulatory role in inflammation and host defense against bacterial infection, notably Mycobacterium tuberculosis (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), one of the major caspase-1 targets, is a multifunctional cytokine that is involved in a host of immune and proinflammatory responses (1). It is produced primarily by activated monocytes and macrophages. It signals through various adaptor proteins and kinases that lead to activation of numerous downstream targets (2-6). Human IL-1β is synthesized as a 31 kDa precursor. To gain activity, the precursor must be cleaved by caspase-1 between Asp116 and Ala117 to yield a 17 kDa mature form (7,8). Detection of the 17 kDa mature form of IL-1β is a good indicator of caspase-1 activity.

$327
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Cleaved-IL-1β (Asp116) (D3A3Z) Rabbit mAb #83186.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), one of the major caspase-1 targets, is a multifunctional cytokine that is involved in a host of immune and proinflammatory responses (1). It is produced primarily by activated monocytes and macrophages. It signals through various adaptor proteins and kinases that lead to activation of numerous downstream targets (2-6). Human IL-1β is synthesized as a 31 kDa precursor. To gain activity, the precursor must be cleaved by caspase-1 between Asp116 and Ala117 to yield a 17 kDa mature form (7,8). Detection of the 17 kDa mature form of IL-1β is a good indicator of caspase-1 activity.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: S100A8 and S100A9 are calcium-binding proteins that form a noncovalent heterodimer present in monocytes, neutrophils, macrophages, and some epithelial cells (1, 2). S100A8 and S100A9 are secreted by a tubulin-dependent mechanism during inflammatory conditions and have antimicrobial and chemotactic functions (3-5). Extracellular S100A8/S100A9 also induces an inflammatory response in endothelial cells, including induction of proinflammatory chemokines and adhesion molecules and increased vascular permeability (6). S100A8/S100A9 induces and recruits myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in tumor-bearing mice (7). MDSC produce additional S100A8/S100A9 themselves, resulting in a positive feedback mechanism that sustains MDSC accumulation (7). S100A8/S100A9 is also highly expressed in psoriatic skin, where it directly upregulates transcription of complement protein C3, which contributes to disease (8). In addition, tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells induce expression of S100A8 and S100A9 in cancer cells, which increases invasiveness and metastasis (9).

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, IHC-Leica® Bond™, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: S100A8 and S100A9 are calcium-binding proteins that form a noncovalent heterodimer present in monocytes, neutrophils, macrophages, and some epithelial cells (1, 2). S100A8 and S100A9 are secreted by a tubulin-dependent mechanism during inflammatory conditions and have antimicrobial and chemotactic functions (3-5). Extracellular S100A8/S100A9 also induces an inflammatory response in endothelial cells, including induction of proinflammatory chemokines and adhesion molecules and increased vascular permeability (6). S100A8/S100A9 induces and recruits myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in tumor-bearing mice (7). MDSC produce additional S100A8/S100A9 themselves, resulting in a positive feedback mechanism that sustains MDSC accumulation (7). S100A8/S100A9 is also highly expressed in psoriatic skin, where it directly upregulates transcription of complement protein C3, which contributes to disease (8). In addition, tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells induce expression of S100A8 and S100A9 in cancer cells, which increases invasiveness and metastasis (9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: A20, also referred to as TNF-α-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3), is cytokine-inducible protein that functions to inhibit apoptosis and activate NF-κB (1,2). It was first identified as a TNF-α inducible primary response gene in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and encodes a 790-amino acid protein containing seven Cys2/Cys2-zinc finger motifs (3). Constitutive expression of A20 is observed in lymphoid tissues (4), but it is transiently expressed in a variety of cell types in response to inflammatory signals such as TNF-α (3,5), IL-1 (3,5), phorbol esters (6), and LPS (7). Expression of A20 can confer resistance to apoptosis and NF-κB activation triggered by these signals, probably through interference with TRAF (TNF receptor associated factor) family members (8,9), and interaction with the NF-κB inhibiting protein ABIN (10). Studies also show that A20 contains site-specific ubiquitin modifying activity that can contribute to its biological functions (11,12). The amino-terminus of A20 contains de-ubiquitinating (DUB) activity for Lys63 branches, such as those found in TRAF6 and RIP, while the carboxyl-terminus contains ubiquitin ligase (E3) activity for Lys48 branches of the same substrates and leads to their degradation (12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Chromosomal translocations result in misregulation of the proto-oncogene BCL6 in patients with B cell-derived non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (1). The BCL6 gene is selectively expressed in mature B cells and encodes a nuclear phosphoprotein that belongs to the BTB/POZ zinc finger family of transcription factors (2,3). BCL6 protein can bind to target DNA sequences of Stat6 and, analogous to Stat6, modulate the expression of interleukin-4-induced genes (4). Furthermore, BCL6 restrains p53-dependent senescence, making BCL6-active tumors functionally p53-negative (5). The mitogen-activated protein kinases, Erk1 and Erk2, but not JNK, phosphorylate BCL6 at multiple sites. Phosphorylation of BCL6 at Ser333 and Ser343 results in degradation of BCL6 by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway in B cells (6,7). In addition, BCL6 is acetylated and its transcriptional repressor function is inhibited by the transcriptional co-activator p300 (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) belongs to a family of highly conserved proteins that contain HMG box domains (1,2). All three family members (HMGB1, HMGB2, and HMGB3) contain two HMG box domains and a C-terminal acidic domain. HMGB1 is a widely expressed and highly abundant protein (2). HMGB2 is widely expressed during embryonic development, but is restricted to lymphoid organs and testis in adult animals (3). HMGB3 is only expressed during embryogenesis (4). While expression varies, the biochemical properties of the different family members may be indistinguishable. The HMG box domains facilitate the binding of HMGB proteins to the minor groove of DNA, which results in local bending of the DNA double helix (1,2). HMGB proteins are recruited by and help facilitate the assembly of site-specific DNA binding proteins to their cognate binding sites in chromatin. For example, HMGB1 facilitates the binding of Hox proteins, Oct-1, p53, Rel proteins, and steroid hormone receptor proteins to their target gene promoters (1,2). In addition to their functions in the nucleus, HMGB proteins play a significant role in extracellular signaling associated with inflammation (5,6). HMGB1 is massively released into the extracellular environment during cell necrosis, but not apoptosis. Extracellular HMGB1 "alarms" the innate immune system by acting as a chemoattractant for inflammatory leukocytes, smooth muscle cells, and stem cells, functioning as an immune adjuvant for soluble and particulate antigens, and triggering activation of T cells and dendritic cells. In addition, activated monocytes, macrophages and, dendritic cells also secrete HMGB1, forming a positive feedback loop that results in the release of additional cytokines and neutrophils. Hypoxia has also been shown to cause the release of HMGB1 in the liver, and some studies suggest a role for extracellular HMGB1 in tumor homeostasis (5,6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Dog, Hamster, Human, Mink, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TNF-α, the prototypical member of the TNF protein superfamily, is a homotrimeric type-II membrane protein (1,2). Membrane-bound TNF-α is cleaved by the metalloprotease TACE/ADAM17 to generate a soluble homotrimer (2). Both membrane and soluble forms of TNF-α are biologically active. TNF-α is produced by a variety of immune cells including T cells, B cells, NK cells, and macrophages (1). Cellular response to TNF-α is mediated through interaction with receptors TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 and results in activation of pathways that favor both cell survival and apoptosis depending on the cell type and biological context. Activation of kinase pathways (including JNK, Erk1/2, p38 MAPK, and NF-κB) promotes the survival of cells, while TNF-α-mediated activation of caspase-8 leads to programmed cell death (1,2). TNF-α plays a key regulatory role in inflammation and host defense against bacterial infection, notably Mycobacterium tuberculosis (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Stat5 is activated in response to a wide variety of ligands including IL-2, GM-CSF, growth hormone and prolactin. Phosphorylation at Tyr694 is obligatory for Stat5 activation (1,2). This phosphorylation is mediated by Src upon erythropoietin stimulation (3). Stat5 is constitutively active in some leukemic cell types (4). Phosphorylated Stat5 is found in some endothelial cells treated with IL-3, which suggests its involvement in angiogenesis and cell motility (5). Stat5a and Stat5b are independently regulated and activated in various cell types. For instance, interferon treatment predominantly activates Stat5a in U-937 cells and Stat5b in HeLa cells (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a proinflammatory cytokine produced predominantly by activated monocytes and epithelial cells (1). Precursor IL-1β is cleaved by caspase-1 and mature IL-1β is then secreted (1-3). Target cells include macrophages and many other cell types. Signaling by IL-1β involves IL-1β binding to IL-1 accessory protein (IL-1-AcP); the complex then binds to IL-1RI (1,2). Signaling occurs through activation of MAP kinase and NF-κB pathways (1,2). IL-1β also binds to IL-1RII, which lacks an intracellular signaling domain and thereby serves as a high affinity decoy receptor. IL-1β binding to IL-1RI is inhibited by the negative regulator, IL-1R antagonist (IL-1Ra). IL-1Ra binding to IL-1RI does not signal and serves to block IL-1β signaling. IL-1β plays critical roles in the acute phase response and sepsis (1-3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), one of the major caspase-1 targets, is a multifunctional cytokine that is involved in a host of immune and proinflammatory responses (1). It is produced primarily by activated monocytes and macrophages. It signals through various adaptor proteins and kinases that lead to activation of numerous downstream targets (2-6). Human IL-1β is synthesized as a 31 kDa precursor. To gain activity, the precursor must be cleaved by caspase-1 between Asp116 and Ala117 to yield a 17 kDa mature form (7,8). Detection of the 17 kDa mature form of IL-1β is a good indicator of caspase-1 activity.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Transcription factors of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/Rel family play a pivotal role in inflammatory and immune responses (1,2). There are five family members in mammals: RelA, c-Rel, RelB, NF-κB1 (p105/p50), and NF-κB2 (p100/p52). Both p105 and p100 are proteolytically processed by the proteasome to produce p50 and p52, respectively. Rel proteins bind p50 and p52 to form dimeric complexes that bind DNA and regulate transcription. In unstimulated cells, NF-κB is sequestered in the cytoplasm by IκB inhibitory proteins (3-5). NF-κB-activating agents can induce the phosphorylation of IκB proteins, targeting them for rapid degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and releasing NF-κB to enter the nucleus where it regulates gene expression (6-8). NIK and IKKα (IKK1) regulate the phosphorylation and processing of NF-κB2 (p100) to produce p52, which translocates to the nucleus (9-11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: TNF-α is an important cytokine produced by numerous cell types including neutrophils, activated lymphoctyes, macrophages and NK cells. It plays a critical role in inflammatory responses and in apoptosis (1). TNF-α exists as a membrane-anchored and soluble form, both of which show biological activity. Response to TNF-α is mediated through two receptors, TNF-R1, which is widely expressed, and TNF-R2, which is expressed mainly in immune and endothelial cells (2). Antagonists to TNF-α have been validated as therapeutic targets for rheumatoid arthritis and other immune disorders (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, named for the closely related Toll receptor in Drosophila, play a pivotal role in innate immune responses (1-4). TLRs recognize conserved motifs found in various pathogens and mediate defense responses (5-7). Triggering of the TLR pathway leads to the activation of NF-κB and subsequent regulation of immune and inflammatory genes (4). The TLRs and members of the IL-1 receptor family share a conserved stretch of approximately 200 amino acids known as the Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain (1). Upon activation, TLRs associate with a number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins containing TIR domains, including myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), MyD88-adaptor-like/TIR-associated protein (MAL/TIRAP), Toll-receptor-associated activator of interferon (TRIF), and Toll-receptor-associated molecule (TRAM) (8-10). This association leads to the recruitment and activation of IRAK1 and IRAK4, which form a complex with TRAF6 to activate TAK1 and IKK (8,11-14). Activation of IKK leads to the degradation of IκB, which normally maintains NF-κB in an inactive state by sequestering it in the cytoplasm.

$305
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated HMGB1 (D3E5) Rabbit mAb #6893.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: High mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) belongs to a family of highly conserved proteins that contain HMG box domains (1,2). All three family members (HMGB1, HMGB2, and HMGB3) contain two HMG box domains and a C-terminal acidic domain. HMGB1 is a widely expressed and highly abundant protein (2). HMGB2 is widely expressed during embryonic development, but is restricted to lymphoid organs and testis in adult animals (3). HMGB3 is only expressed during embryogenesis (4). While expression varies, the biochemical properties of the different family members may be indistinguishable. The HMG box domains facilitate the binding of HMGB proteins to the minor groove of DNA, which results in local bending of the DNA double helix (1,2). HMGB proteins are recruited by and help facilitate the assembly of site-specific DNA binding proteins to their cognate binding sites in chromatin. For example, HMGB1 facilitates the binding of Hox proteins, Oct-1, p53, Rel proteins, and steroid hormone receptor proteins to their target gene promoters (1,2). In addition to their functions in the nucleus, HMGB proteins play a significant role in extracellular signaling associated with inflammation (5,6). HMGB1 is massively released into the extracellular environment during cell necrosis, but not apoptosis. Extracellular HMGB1 "alarms" the innate immune system by acting as a chemoattractant for inflammatory leukocytes, smooth muscle cells, and stem cells, functioning as an immune adjuvant for soluble and particulate antigens, and triggering activation of T cells and dendritic cells. In addition, activated monocytes, macrophages and, dendritic cells also secrete HMGB1, forming a positive feedback loop that results in the release of additional cytokines and neutrophils. Hypoxia has also been shown to cause the release of HMGB1 in the liver, and some studies suggest a role for extracellular HMGB1 in tumor homeostasis (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1a) belongs to the IL-1 family of cytokines with 11 members including IL-1b. IL-1a is expressed in many cell types of both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic origins under steady state, and its expression can be increased in response to appropriate stimuli (1,2). Like IL-1b, IL-1a is also synthesized as a precursor (pro-IL-1a) and can be cleaved into smaller mature forms. However, both pro-IL-1a and the cleaved form of IL-1a are biologically active and can activate the signaling pathway through the membrane receptor IL-1R1. IL-1a is active both as a secreted form and as a membrane-bound form. Due to such characteristics, passive leakage of IL-1a from dying cells can activate inflammation, leading some researchers to consider IL-1a as a key “alarmin in the cell” that alerts the host to damage or injury (3,4). In addition, IL-1a can also enter the nucleus to modulate transcription (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: INDO/IDO1/indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an IFN-γ-inducible enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step of tryptophan degradation (1). IDO is upregulated in many tumors and in dendritic cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes. Elevated tryptophan catabolism in these cells leads to tryptophan starvation of T cells, limiting T cell proliferation and activation (2). Therefore, IDO is considered an immunosuppresive molecule, and research studies have shown that upregulation of IDO is a mechanism of cancer immune evasion (3). The gastrointestinal stromal tumor drug, imatinib, was found to act, in part, by reducing IDO expression, resulting in increased CD8+ T cell activation and induction of apoptosis in regulatory T cells (4). In addition to its enzymatic activity, IDO was recently shown to have signaling capability through an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) that is phosphorylated by Fyn in response to TGF-β. This leads to recruitment of SHP-1 and activation of the noncanonical NF-κB pathway (5).