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Monoclonal Antibody Western Blotting Kininogen Binding

Also showing Monoclonal Antibody Immunohistochemistry Paraffin Kininogen Binding

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Cathepsin B (CSTB), part of the papain family of proteases, is a widely expressed lysosomal cysteine endopeptidase (1,2). Cathepsin B is produced from a larger precursor form, pro-cathepsin B, which runs at approximately 44 kDa on SDS-PAGE, and is proteolytically processed and glycosylated to form a mature two-chain protein containing a heavy chain (running at 27 and 24 kDa) and a light chain (5 kDa). High levels of cathepsin B are found in macrophages and osteoclasts, as well as various types of cancer cells, including lung, colon, prostate, breast, and stomach. In addition, expression of cathepsin B has been associated with multiple sclerosis (3), rheumatoid arthritis (4), and pancreatitis (5). While generally localized to lysosomes, in cancer alterations can lead to its secretion (6). Its role in tumor progression is thought to involve promotion of basement membrane degradation, invasion and metastasis (7,8). Expression can correlate with poor prognosis for a variety of forms of cancer (9-13).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: C1QBP, also referred to as p32, p33, gC1q receptor (gC1qR), and hyaluronic acid binding protein 1 (HABP1), was originally identified via its binding interactions with Splicing Factor (SF-2) (1). Multiple, diverse binding partners of C1QBP were subsequently identified, including the globular heads of complement component C1q, hyaluronic acid, selected protein kinases (2), the tumor suppressor ARF (3-5), and multiple antigens of bacterial and viral origin (6). Research studies have shown that C1QBP is overexpressed in a number of cancer cell types (7), and has been implicated in the Warburg effect, whereby cancer cells shift their metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis (7). C1QBP has also been shown to inhibit the Mitochondrial Permeability Transition (MPT) pore, possibly serving a protective function against damage from oxidative stress (8).