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Monoclonal Antibody Western Blotting Mouse

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: RPA70 (HSSB, REPA1, RF-A, RP-A, p70) is a component of a heterotrimeric complex, composed of 70, 32/30 and 14 kDa subunits, collectively known as RPA. RPA is a single stranded DNA binding protein, whose DNA binding activity is believed to reside entirely in the 70 kDa subunit. The complex is required for almost all aspects of cellular DNA metabolism such as DNA replication (1-3), recombination, cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints, and all major types of DNA repair including nucleotide excision, base excision, mismatch and double-strand break repairs (4-7). In response to genotoxic stress in eukaryotic cells, RPA has been shown to associate with the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1) checkpoint complex (8). RPA is hyperphosphorylated upon DNA damage or replication stress by checkpoint kinases including ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (9-11). Phosphorylation of RPA32 occurs at serines 4, 8 and 33 (11). Hyperphosphorylation may alter RPA-DNA and RPA-protein interactions. In addition to the checkpoint partners, RPA interacts with a wide variety of protein partners, including proteins required for normal replication such as RCF, PCNA and Pol α, and also proteins involved in SV40 replication, such as DNA polymerase I and SV40 large T antigen (10,12).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Peptide ELISA (DELFIA), Western Blotting

Background: The ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins function as linkers between the plasma membrane and the actin cytoskeleton and are involved in cell adhesion, membrane ruffling, and microvilli formation (1). ERM proteins undergo intra or intermolecular interaction between their amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, existing as inactive cytosolic monomers or dimers (2). Phosphorylation at a carboxy-terminal threonine residue (Thr567 of ezrin, Thr564 of radixin, Thr558 of moesin) disrupts the amino- and carboxy-terminal association and may play a key role in regulating ERM protein conformation and function (3,4). Phosphorylation at Thr567 of ezrin is required for cytoskeletal rearrangements and oncogene-induced transformation (5). Ezrin is also phosphorylated at tyrosine residues upon growth factor stimulation. Phosphorylation of Tyr353 of ezrin transmits a survival signal during epithelial differentiation (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding domain (CHD) proteins have been identified in a variety of organisms (1,2). This family of proteins, which consists of nine members, has been divided into three separate subfamilies: subfamily I (CHD1 and CHD2), subfamily II (CHD3 and CHD4), and subfamily III (CHD5, CHD6, CHD7, CHD8, and CHD9). All of the CHD proteins contain two tandem N-terminal chromodomains, a SWI/SNF-related ATPase domain, and a C-terminal DNA binding domain (1,2). The chromodomains facilitate binding to methylated lysine residues of histone proteins and confer interactions with specific regions of chromatin. The SWI/SNF-related ATPase domain utilizes the energy from ATP hydrolysis to modify chromatin structure. CHD1 is a euchromatic protein that associates with the promoters of active genes, and is required for the maintenance of open chromatin and pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (3-6). The two chromodomains of CHD1 facilitate its recruitment to active genes by binding to methyl-lysine 4 of histone H3, a mark associated with transcriptional activation (4-6). Yeast CHD1 is a component of the SAGA and SLIK histone acetyltransferase complexes, and is believed to link histone methylation with histone acetylation during transcriptional activation (6). The CHD2 protein is not well characterized; however, mouse knockout studies suggest important functions in development and tumor suppression. Homozygous CHD2 knockout mice exhibit delayed growth and perinatal lethality (7). Heterozygous knockout mice show increased mortality and gross organ abnormalities, in addition to increased extramedullary hematopoiesis and susceptibility to lymphomas (7,8). CHD2 mutant cells are defective in hematopoietic stem cell differentiation and exhibit aberrant DNA damage responses (8).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Clathrin-coated vesicles provide for the intracellular transport of cargo proteins following endocytosis and during multiple vesicle trafficking pathways. Vesicles form at specialized areas of the cell membrane where clathrin and associated proteins form clathrin-coated pits. Invagination of these cell membrane-associated pits internalizes proteins and forms an intracellular clathrin-coated vesicle (1,2). Clathrin is the most abundant protein in these vesicles and is present as a basic assembly unit called a triskelion. Each clathrin triskelion is composed of three clathrin heavy chains and three clathrin light chains. Clathrin heavy chain proteins are composed of several functional domains, including a carboxy-terminal region that permits interaction with other heavy chain proteins within a triskelion, and a globular amino-terminal region that associates with other vesicle proteins (2). Adaptor proteins, such as AP2, epsin and EPS15, are responsible for the recruitment of vesicle proteins to sites of pit formation and the assembly of the clathrin-coated vesicle. Following vesicle invagination, the GTPase dynamin constricts the neck of the nascent vesicle to complete formation of the free, cytosolic vesicle (3,4).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The serum response factor (SRF) is a 67 kDa phospho-protein that, together with auxiliary factors, modulates transcription of immediate early genes containing serum response elements at their promoters (1,2). SRF contains several phosphorylation sites (3), but functional consequences of phosphorylation have not been identified unequivocally. Several growth factor- and calcium-regulated kinases, such as p90RSK and CaM kinase IV, can phosphorylate SRF at Ser103 (4,5), and Ser103 of SRF is also a nuclear target for MAPKAP kinase 2 (6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: AKAPs (A-kinase anchoring proteins), as their name implies, are a family of scaffolding proteins that bind regulatory subunits of Protein Kinase A (PKA) thus localizing PKA activity to distinct regions of the cell (1). Beyond a common amphipathic alpha-helix which is responsible for recruiting the PKA regulatory subunit (RIα, RIIα, RIβ, or RIIβ), individual AKAPs contain additional domains responsible for the recrutiment of additional signaling proteins (phosphodiesterases, phosphatases, cytoskeletal components, other kinase, etc.) or restricting the AKAP to a specific subcellular location (1). AKAP1, also known as AKAP149 in human, AKAP121 in rat, or D-AKAP in mouse is a dual-specificity AKAP which can bind to both RI and RII subunits of PKA with similar affinity (2,3). Originally thought to be predominantly restricted to the mitochondria, growing evidence suggests that localization of AKAP1 can be regulated in part by alternative splicing events and that AKAP1 may be present in the endoplasmic reticulum-nuclear envelope membrane network (4-6). Peri-nuclear localization, along with the fact that AKAP1 interacts with RNA via one of two nucleotide-binding domains (K homology (KH) and Tudor) have lead some to suggest that AKAP1 may play a role in RNA metabolism (7,8). In addition to PKA-RI and -RII, AKAP1 directly interacts with PP1 in a phosphorylation dependent manner and nucleates a complex containing PP2Ac, PKA and RSK1 which modulates RSK1 localization and activity (9-12).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: RBPSUH (Recombining Binding Protein, SUppressor of Hairless), also termed RBP-J or CSL, is the DNA-binding component of the transcription complex regulated by canonical Notch signaling. In the absence of Notch activation, RBPSUH suppresses target gene expression through interactions with a co-repressor complex containing histone deacetylase. Upon activation of Notch receptors, the Notch intracellular domain (NICD) translocates to the nucleus and binds to RBPSUH. This displaces the co-repressor complex and replaces it with a transcription activation complex that includes Mastermind-like (MAML) proteins and histone acetylase p300, leading to transcriptional activation of Notch target genes (1-3). RBPSUH is also the DNA-binding partner for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2), a protein critical for latent viral transcription and immortalization of EBV-infected B cells (4,5).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Members of the Smad family of signal transduction molecules are components of a critical intracellular pathway that transmit TGF-β signals from the cell surface into the nucleus. Three distinct classes of Smads have been defined: the receptor-regulated Smads (R-Smads), which include Smad1, 2, 3, 5, and 8; the common-mediator Smad (co-Smad), Smad4; and the antagonistic or inhibitory Smads (I-Smads), Smad6 and 7 (1-5). Activated type I receptors associate with specific R-Smads and phosphorylate them on a conserved carboxy terminal SSXS motif. The phosphorylated R-Smad dissociates from the receptor and forms a heteromeric complex with the co-Smad (Smad4), allowing translocation of the complex to the nucleus. Once in the nucleus, Smads can target a variety of DNA binding proteins to regulate transcriptional responses (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ribosomal protein L26 (RPL26) is a component of the 60S ribosomal subunit and is involved in translation (1,2). It was shown that RPL26 increases the translation of p53 mRNA by binding to its 5' untranslated region (UTR) after DNA damage. Studies found that overexpression of RPL26 enhances the binding of p53 mRNA to the ribosomes and increases p53 translation. Overexpression of RPL26 also induces cell-cycle arrest at G1 phase and increases radiation-stimulated apoptosis (2).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: p70 S6 kinase is a mitogen activated Ser/Thr protein kinase downstream of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) and the target of rapamycin, FRAP/mTOR. p70 S6 kinase is required for cell growth and cell cycle progression (1,2). SKAR is a recently discovered substrate of S6K1. SKAR exists in two isoforms, α and β, the latter having a 29 amino acid truncation. Phosphorylation of SKAR is mitogen-induced and sensitive to rapamycin. Reduction in SKAR protein levels results in decreased cell size, further implicating SKAR in cell growth control (3).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) is a heterodimeric transcription factor that plays a critical role in the cellular response to hypoxia (1). The HIF1 complex consists of two subunits, HIF-1α and HIF-1β, which are basic helix-loop-helix proteins of the PAS (Per, ARNT, Sim) family (2). HIF1 regulates the transcription of a broad range of genes that facilitate responses to the hypoxic environment, including genes regulating angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, cell cycle, metabolism, and apoptosis. The widely expressed HIF-1α is typically degraded rapidly in normoxic cells by the ubiquitin/proteasomal pathway. Under normoxic conditions, HIF-1α is proline hydroxylated leading to a conformational change that promotes binding to the von Hippel Lindau protein (VHL) E3 ligase complex; ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation follows (3,4). Both hypoxic conditions and chemical hydroxylase inhibitors (such as desferrioxamine and cobalt) inhibit HIF-1α degradation and lead to its stabilization. In addition, HIF-1α can be induced in an oxygen-independent manner by various cytokines through the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway (5-7).HIF-1β is also known as AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) due to its ability to partner with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) to form a heterodimeric transcription factor complex (8). Together with AhR, HIF-1β plays an important role in xenobiotics metabolism (8). In addition, a chromosomal translocation leading to a TEL-ARNT fusion protein is associated with acute myeloblastic leukemia (9). Studies also found that ARNT/HIF-1β expression levels decrease significantly in pancreatic islets from patients with type 2 diabetes, suggesting that HIF-1β plays an important role in pancreatic β-cell function (10).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors, and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ, and PLCε. Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulate the activity of PLC. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (2). PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783, and 1248 (3). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (4). PLCγ2 is engaged in antigen-dependent signaling in B cells and collagen-dependent signaling in platelets. Phosphorylation by Btk or Lck at Tyr753, 759, 1197, and 1217 is correlated with PLCγ2 activity (5,6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Western Blotting

Background: The nucleosome, made up of four core histone proteins (H2A, H2B, H3, and H4), is the primary building block of chromatin. Originally thought to function as a static scaffold for DNA packaging, histones have now been shown to be dynamic proteins, undergoing multiple types of post-translational modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, and ubiquitination (1). Histone methylation is a major determinant for the formation of active and inactive regions of the genome and is crucial for the proper programming of the genome during development (2,3). Arginine methylation of histones H3 (Arg2, 17, 26) and H4 (Arg3) promotes transcriptional activation and is mediated by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), including the co-activators PRMT1 and CARM1 (PRMT4) (4). In contrast, a more diverse set of histone lysine methyltransferases has been identified, all but one of which contain a conserved catalytic SET domain originally identified in the Drosophila Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax proteins. Lysine methylation occurs primarily on histones H3 (Lys4, 9, 27, 36, 79) and H4 (Lys20) and has been implicated in both transcriptional activation and silencing (4). Methylation of these lysine residues coordinates the recruitment of chromatin modifying enzymes containing methyl-lysine binding modules such as chromodomains (HP1, PRC1), PHD fingers (BPTF, ING2), tudor domains (53BP1), and WD-40 domains (WDR5) (5-8). The discovery of histone demethylases such as PADI4, LSD1, JMJD1, JMJD2, and JHDM1 has shown that methylation is a reversible epigenetic marker (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Western Blotting

Background: Brd2 is a highly conserved member of the BET subfamily of bromodomain proteins that contain two tandem N-terminal bromodomains and a single C-terminal extra-terminal (ET) domain (1). In addition to its involvement in guiding the expression of cell cycle genes through its binding to multiple E2Fs (2), Brd2 has been shown to be associated with several regulators of transcription, including TFIID and Swi/Snf complexes (3,4). First identified as a nuclear serine/threonine kinase (5), Brd2, like other bromodomain proteins, is thought to function in mammalian development by regulating chromatin structure and transcription (6). Brd2 has been shown to bind to histone H4 via acetylated Lys12, a substrate of several histone acetyltransferase transcriptional coactivators (7). In mouse, Brd2 has the highest levels of expression during embryogenesis and in the adult testis, ovaries, and brain (8,9,10). Brd2-deficient mouse embryos exhibit delayed development and eventual death due to neural tube closure defects (11). Mutations in the promoter of the Brd2 gene have been associated with increased susceptibility to juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) (12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The polycomb group (PcG) of proteins contributes to the maintenance of cell identity, stem cell self-renewal, cell cycle regulation, and oncogenesis by maintaining the silenced state of genes that promote cell lineage specification, cell death, and cell-cycle arrest (1-4). PcG proteins exist in two complexes that cooperate to maintain long-term gene silencing through epigenetic chromatin modifications. The first complex, EED-EZH2, is recruited to genes by DNA-binding transcription factors and methylates histone H3 on Lys27. This histone methyl-transferase activity requires the Ezh2, Eed, and Suz12 subunits of the complex (5). Histone H3 methylation at Lys27 facilitates the recruitment of the second complex, PRC1, which ubiquitinylates histone H2A on Lys119 (6). Bmi1 is a component of the PRC1 complex, which together with Ring1 strongly enhances the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of the Ring2 catalytic subunit (7). Bmi1 plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation and senescence through repression of the p16 INK4A and p19 ARF genes and is required for maintenance of adult hematopoietic and neural stem cells (3,4,8-10).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The cohesin complex consists of a heterodimer between SMC1 (SMC1A or B) and SMC3, bound by additional RAD21 and STAG proteins (STAG1, 2, or 3) (1,2). These proteins form a ring-like structure that mediates the cohesion of two sister chromatids after DNA replication in S phase (1,2). RAD21 and STAG2 are phosphorylated by Polo-like kinase (PLK) during prophase, which leads to the dissociation of cohesin complexes from the chromosome arms; however, cohesin remains bound to centromeres until anaphase (3,4). RAD21 is cleaved by separin/ESPL1 in anaphase, which leads to dissociation of the remaining cohesin from centromeres, enabling sister chromatids to segregate during mitosis (5). RAD21 is also cleaved by caspase-3 and caspase-7 during apoptosis, resulting in a 64 kDa carboxy-terminal cleavage product that translocates to the cytoplasm and may help to trigger apoptosis (6,7). In addition to mediating cohesion of sister chromatids, the cohesin complex plays important roles in gene regulation and DNA repair, as SMC1 and SMC3 are both phosphorylated by ATM and ATR kinases upon DNA damage (1,2).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Drosophila piwi gene was identified as being required for the self-renewal of germ-line stem cells (1). Piwi homologs are well conserved among various species including Arabidopsis, C. elegans, and human (1). Miwi and Mili proteins are both mouse homologs of Piwi and contain a C-terminal Piwi domain (2). Miwi and Mili bind to Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) in male germ cells and are essential for spermatogenesis in mouse (3-5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CBP (CREB-binding protein) and p300 are highly conserved and functionally related transcriptional co-activators that associate with transcriptional regulators and signaling molecules, integrating multiple signal transduction pathways with the transcriptional machinery (1,2). CBP/p300 also contain histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity, allowing them to acetylate histones and other proteins (2). Phosphorylation of p300 at Ser89 by PKC represses its transciptional acitivity, and phosphorylation at the same site by AMPK disrupts the association of p300 with nuclear receptors (3,4). Ser1834 phosphorylation of p300 by Akt disrupts its association with C/EBPβ (5). Growth factors induce phosphorylation of CBP at Ser437, which is required for CBP recruitment to the transcription complex (6). CaM kinase IV phosphorylates CBP at Ser302, which is required for CBP-dependent transcriptional activation in the CNS (7). The role of acetylation of CBP/p300 is of particular interest (2,8). Acetylation of p300 at Lys1499 has been demonstrated to enhance its HAT activity and affect a wide variety of signaling events (9).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microfilaments (actin filaments), intermediate filaments, and microtubules. Major types of intermediate filaments are distinguished by their cell-specific expression: cytokeratins (epithelial cells), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (glial cells), desmin (skeletal, visceral, and certain vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchyme origin), and neurofilaments (neurons). GFAP and vimentin form intermediate filaments in astroglial cells and modulate their motility and shape (1). In particular, vimentin filaments are present at early developmental stages, while GFAP filaments are characteristic of differentiated and mature brain astrocytes. Thus, GFAP is commonly used as a marker for intracranial and intraspinal tumors arising from astrocytes (2). Research studies have shown that vimentin is present in sarcomas, but not carcinomas, and its expression is examined in conjunction with that of other markers to distinguish between the two (3). Vimentin's dynamic structural changes and spatial re-organization in response to extracellular stimuli help to coordinate various signaling pathways (4). Phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser56 in smooth muscle cells regulates the structural arrangement of vimentin filaments in response to serotonin (5,6). Remodeling of vimentin and other intermediate filaments is important during lymphocyte adhesion and migration through the endothelium (7).During mitosis, CDK1 phosphorylates vimentin at Ser56. This phosphorylation provides a PLK binding site for vimentin-PLK interaction. PLK further phosphorylates vimentin at Ser82, which might serve as memory phosphorylation site and play a regulatory role in vimentin filament disassembly (8,9). Additionally, studies using various soft-tissue sarcoma cells have shown that phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser39 by Akt1 enhances cell migration and survival, suggesting that vimentin could be a potential target for soft-tissue sarcoma targeted therapy (10,11).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CBP (CREB-binding protein) and p300 are highly conserved and functionally related transcriptional co-activators that associate with transcriptional regulators and signaling molecules, integrating multiple signal transduction pathways with the transcriptional machinery (1,2). CBP/p300 also contain histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity, allowing them to acetylate histones and other proteins (2). Phosphorylation of p300 at Ser89 by PKC represses its transciptional acitivity, and phosphorylation at the same site by AMPK disrupts the association of p300 with nuclear receptors (3,4). Ser1834 phosphorylation of p300 by Akt disrupts its association with C/EBPβ (5). Growth factors induce phosphorylation of CBP at Ser437, which is required for CBP recruitment to the transcription complex (6). CaM kinase IV phosphorylates CBP at Ser302, which is required for CBP-dependent transcriptional activation in the CNS (7). The role of acetylation of CBP/p300 is of particular interest (2,8). Acetylation of p300 at Lys1499 has been demonstrated to enhance its HAT activity and affect a wide variety of signaling events (9).