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Monoclonal Antibody Western Blotting Potassium Channel Activity

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The voltage gated potassium channel Kv7.2 (KCNQ2) associates with its family member Kv7.3 (KCNQ3) to form an M-channel that is involved in synaptic input response and sub-threshold excitability of neurons (1). This heteromeric channel generates the M-current, a slowly activating and deactivating potassium conductance that determines the neuronal excitability (2,3). Expression of these two M-channel proteins is mainly seen within the central nervous system, with both Kv7.2 and Kv7.3 expressed post-synaptically in the human cortex and hippocampus (4). The calcium-binding protein calmodulin binds two separate sites in Kv7.2 to influence exit of the channel protein from the endoplasmic reticulum and translocation to the plasma membrane (5). Mutations in the corresponding KCNQ2 gene cause benign familial neonatal seizures-1 (BFNS1), an autosomal dominant form of epilepsy characterized by seizure clusters closely following birth (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: GIRK2 is a member of G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channel family proteins (GIRKs). GIRK family proteins allow potassium to flow into the cell and therefore control cellular excitability in the central nervous system, heart, and pancreas (1-4). Activation of most GIRK channels requires heterologous subunit assembly and the presence of ATP (5-7). GIRK2 is abundantly expressed in the brain, where it is involved in pain perception. It is also required for peripheral opioid-mediated analgesia (8). Additionally GIRK2 localizes to pancreatic β cells and regulates insulin secretion (9,10). Mutations in the KCNJ6 gene encoding GIRK2 are associated with Keppen-Lubinsky Syndrome, a rare disease characterized by severe developmental delay, facial dysmorphism, and intellectual disability (11).