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Monoclonal Antibody Western Blotting Protein Phosphatase Regulator Activity

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: SHOC2 is a scaffolding protein that harbors multiple leucine-rich repeats in tandem and is an upstream positive regulator of growth factor-dependent MAPK/ERK signaling. Research studies have demonstrated that SHOC2 forms a complex with the catalytic subunit of the PP1 phosphatase and M-Ras, and this complex drives activation of Raf-ERK signaling in response to mitogenic growth factors (1). SHOC2 has also been shown to cross-talk with and activate the PI3K/Akt signaling axis through its interaction with the p110α catalytic subunit of PI3K (2). As a positive regulator of ERK and PI3K/Akt signaling cascades, SHOC2 has been implicated in the regulation of several oncogenic cellular processes such as cell motility, invasion, and metastasis (2). A mutation in SHOC2 that introduces an N-terminal myristoylation site, promotes aberrant membrane targeting of SHOC2, hyperactive MAPK/ERK signaling, and Noonan-like syndrome (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Dog, Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a ubiquitous eukaryotic protein serine/threonine phosphatase involved in the regulation of various cell functions. Substrate specificity is determined by the binding of a regulatory subunit to the PP1 catalytic subunit (PP1c). It is estimated that over fifty different regulatory subunits exist (1).The myosin phosphatase holoenzyme is composed of three subunits: PP1c, a targeting/regulatory subunit (MYPT/myosin-binding subunit of myosin phosphatase), and a 20 kDa subunit of unknown function (M20). MYPT binding to PP1cδ alters the conformation of the catalytic cleft and increases enzyme activity and specificity (2). Two MYPT isoforms that are 61% identical have been described. MYPT1 is widely expressed, while MYPT2 expression appears to be exclusive to heart and brain (3). Related family members include MBS85, MYPT3, and TIMAP (4).Myosin phosphatase regulates the interaction of actin and myosin in response to signaling through the small GTPase Rho. Rho activity inhibits myosin phosphatase via Rho-associated kinase (ROCK). Phosphorylation of MYPT1 at Thr696 and Thr853 results in phosphatase inhibition and cytoskeletal reorganization (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Mitotic control is important for normal growth, development, and maintenance of all eukaryotic cells. Research studies have demonstrated that inappropriate control of mitosis can lead to genomic instability and cancer (reviewed in 1,2). A regulator of mitosis, Greatwall kinase (Gwl), was first identified in Drosophila melanogaster (3). Subsequent studies showed that, based on sequence homology and function, microtubule-associated serine/threonine kinase-like (MASTL) is the human ortholog of Gwl (4). Regulation of MASTL/Gwl activation has been shown to be critical for the correct timing of mitosis. Research studies have shown that Gwl is activated by hyperphosphorylation (5). The phosphorylation of human Gwl at Thr194 and Thr207 by active cyclin B1-cdc2 leads to possible autophosphorylation at Ser875 (Ser883 in Xenopus), which stabilizes the kinase. Activated Gwl phosphorylates α-Endosulfine (ENSA) and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 19 (ARPP19) at Ser67 and Ser62, respectively. Phosphorylated ENSA and ARPP19 inhibit the activity of the B55 subunit-associated form of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-B55), allowing for complete phosphorylation of mitotic substrates by cyclin B1-cdc2 and mitotic entry. When Gwl is inactivated, PP2A-B55 reactivates, which leads to dephosphorylation of cyclin B1-cdc2 and mitotic exit (5,6, reviewed in 7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DARPP-32 (dopamine and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein, relative molecular mass 32,000) is a cytosolic protein highly enriched in medium-sized spiny neurons of the neostriatum (1). It is a bifunctional signaling molecule that controls serine/threonine kinase and serine/threonine phosphatase activity (2). Dopamine stimulates phosphorylation of DARPP-32 through D1 receptors and activation of PKA. PKA phosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Thr34 converts it into an inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 (1). DARPP-32 is converted into an inhibitor of PKA when phosphorylated at Thr75 by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) (2). Mice containing a targeted deletion of the DARPP-32 gene exhibit an altered biochemical, electrophysiological, and behavioral phenotype (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: DARPP-32 (dopamine and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein, relative molecular mass 32,000) is a cytosolic protein highly enriched in medium-sized spiny neurons of the neostriatum (1). It is a bifunctional signaling molecule that controls serine/threonine kinase and serine/threonine phosphatase activity (2). Dopamine stimulates phosphorylation of DARPP-32 through D1 receptors and activation of PKA. PKA phosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Thr34 converts it into an inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 (1). DARPP-32 is converted into an inhibitor of PKA when phosphorylated at Thr75 by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) (2). Mice containing a targeted deletion of the DARPP-32 gene exhibit an altered biochemical, electrophysiological, and behavioral phenotype (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: DARPP-32 (dopamine and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein, relative molecular mass 32,000) is a cytosolic protein highly enriched in medium-sized spiny neurons of the neostriatum (1). It is a bifunctional signaling molecule that controls serine/threonine kinase and serine/threonine phosphatase activity (2). Dopamine stimulates phosphorylation of DARPP-32 through D1 receptors and activation of PKA. PKA phosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Thr34 converts it into an inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 (1). DARPP-32 is converted into an inhibitor of PKA when phosphorylated at Thr75 by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) (2). Mice containing a targeted deletion of the DARPP-32 gene exhibit an altered biochemical, electrophysiological, and behavioral phenotype (3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) is an essential protein serine/threonine phosphatase that is conserved in all eukaryotes. PP2A is a key enzyme within various signal transduction pathways as it regulates fundamental cellular activities such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, metabolism, cell cycle progression, cell division, apoptosis and development (1-3). The core enzyme consists of catalytic C and regulatory A (or PR65) subunits, with each subunit represented by α and β isoforms (1). Additional regulatory subunits belong to four different families of unrelated proteins. Both the B (or PR55) and B' regulatory protein families contain α, β, γ and δ isoforms, with the B' family also including an ε protein. B'' family proteins include PR72, PR130, PR59 and PR48 isoforms, while striatin (PR110) and SG2NA (PR93) are both members of the B''' regulatory protein family. These B subunits competitively bind to a shared binding site on the core A subunit (1). This variable array of holoenzyme components, particularly regulatory B subunits, allows PP2A to act in a diverse set of functions. PP2A function is regulated by expression, localization, holoenzyme composition and post-translational modification. Phosphorylation of PP2A at Tyr307 by Src occurs in response to EGF or insulin and results in a substantial reduction of PP2A activity (4). Reversible methylation on the carboxyl group of Leu309 of PP2A has been observed (5,6). Methylation alters the conformation of PP2A, as well as its localization and association with B regulatory subunits (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein Phosphatase 2A subunit isoform R5-δ (PPP2R5D) belongs to the R5/B'/B56 family of the regulatory subunit B of serine/threonine phosphatase 2A (1). PPP2R5D (B-δ) is structurally related to the other components of subunit B, B-α. PPP2R5D lacks the WD-40 repeats that are important for protein-protein interaction (1-2). Structural differences may contribute to distinct down stream effects (3) and directing PP2A nuclear localization (4). Current evidence suggests that in contrast to B-α, PPP2R5D modulates the TGF-β/Actividin/Nodal signaling pathways by restricting the downstream activities of the type I TGF-β receptors, ALK4, and ALK5 (3)

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) is an essential protein serine/threonine phosphatase that is conserved in all eukaryotes. PP2A is a key enzyme within various signal transduction pathways as it regulates fundamental cellular activities such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, metabolism, cell cycle progression, cell division, apoptosis and development (1-3). The core enzyme consists of catalytic C and regulatory A (or PR65) subunits, with each subunit represented by α and β isoforms (1). Additional regulatory subunits belong to four different families of unrelated proteins. Both the B (or PR55) and B' regulatory protein families contain α, β, γ and δ isoforms, with the B' family also including an ε protein. B'' family proteins include PR72, PR130, PR59 and PR48 isoforms, while striatin (PR110) and SG2NA (PR93) are both members of the B''' regulatory protein family. These B subunits competitively bind to a shared binding site on the core A subunit (1). This variable array of holoenzyme components, particularly regulatory B subunits, allows PP2A to act in a diverse set of functions. PP2A function is regulated by expression, localization, holoenzyme composition and post-translational modification. Phosphorylation of PP2A at Tyr307 by Src occurs in response to EGF or insulin and results in a substantial reduction of PP2A activity (4). Reversible methylation on the carboxyl group of Leu309 of PP2A has been observed (5,6). Methylation alters the conformation of PP2A, as well as its localization and association with B regulatory subunits (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) is an essential protein serine/threonine phosphatase that is conserved in all eukaryotes. PP2A is a key enzyme within various signal transduction pathways as it regulates fundamental cellular activities such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, metabolism, cell cycle progression, cell division, apoptosis and development (1-3). The core enzyme consists of catalytic C and regulatory A (or PR65) subunits, with each subunit represented by α and β isoforms (1). Additional regulatory subunits belong to four different families of unrelated proteins. Both the B (or PR55) and B' regulatory protein families contain α, β, γ and δ isoforms, with the B' family also including an ε protein. B'' family proteins include PR72, PR130, PR59 and PR48 isoforms, while striatin (PR110) and SG2NA (PR93) are both members of the B''' regulatory protein family. These B subunits competitively bind to a shared binding site on the core A subunit (1). This variable array of holoenzyme components, particularly regulatory B subunits, allows PP2A to act in a diverse set of functions. PP2A function is regulated by expression, localization, holoenzyme composition and post-translational modification. Phosphorylation of PP2A at Tyr307 by Src occurs in response to EGF or insulin and results in a substantial reduction of PP2A activity (4). Reversible methylation on the carboxyl group of Leu309 of PP2A has been observed (5,6). Methylation alters the conformation of PP2A, as well as its localization and association with B regulatory subunits (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 2 (NHERF2) is one of four proteins in the NHERF protein family. It is closely related to NHERF1 and, like NHERF1, contains two PDZ domains and a C-terminal ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) binding domain (EBD). Along with the other members of this protein family, NHERF2 is abundantly present in the mammalian small intestine and colon where it plays a central role in trafficking, membrane retention, dimerization, and regulation of ion channels and membrane proteins (1). NHERF2 is a scaffolding protein that recruits membrane proteins to the apical membrane by tethering them to the apical cytoskeleton via its ERM domain (2). It has been shown that the NHERF proteins bind to the Na+/H+ exchanger 3 (NHE3) in the brush border of intestinal epithelial cells. NHE3 accounts for the majority of neutral NaCl absorbtion and NHERF proteins play an essential role in NHE3 regulation (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

$269
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF1 or EBP-50) is one of several related PDZ domain-containing proteins (1). NHERF1 was first identified as a necessary cofactor for cyclic AMP-associated inhibition of Na+/ H+ exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) (2). NHERF1 is a multifunctional adaptor protein that interacts with receptors and ion transporters via its PDZ domains, and with the ERM family of proteins, including merlin, via its carboxy-terminus (2,3). NHERF1 may play an important role in breast cancer. Estrogen has been found to induce NHERF1 in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells (2,3). Furthermore, NHERF1 has been shown to bind to PDGFR, which is activated in breast carcinomas. NHERF1 has been found to promote the formation of a ternary complex containing PTEN, NHERF1, and PDGFR. Therefore, NHERF1 may function to recruit PTEN to PDGFR to inhibit the activation of PI3K/Akt signaling in normal cells; this mechanism may be disrupted in cancer (4). NHERF1 also binds to the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which functions as an ion channel and has disease-causing mutations in cystic fibrosis (5). Other proposed functions of NHERF1 include testicular differentiation, endosomal recycling, membrane targeting, protein sorting, and trafficking (6).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase that belongs to the HER/ErbB protein family. Ligand binding results in receptor dimerization, autophosphorylation, activation of downstream signaling, internalization, and lysosomal degradation (1,2). Phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) at Tyr845 in the kinase domain is implicated in stabilizing the activation loop, maintaining the active state enzyme, and providing a binding surface for substrate proteins (3,4). c-Src is involved in phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr845 (5). The SH2 domain of PLCγ binds at phospho-Tyr992, resulting in activation of PLCγ-mediated downstream signaling (6). Phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1045 creates a major docking site for the adaptor protein c-Cbl, leading to receptor ubiquitination and degradation following EGFR activation (7,8). The GRB2 adaptor protein binds activated EGFR at phospho-Tyr1068 (9). A pair of phosphorylated EGFR residues (Tyr1148 and Tyr1173) provide a docking site for the Shc scaffold protein, with both sites involved in MAP kinase signaling activation (2). Phosphorylation of EGFR at specific serine and threonine residues attenuates EGFR kinase activity. EGFR carboxy-terminal residues Ser1046 and Ser1047 are phosphorylated by CaM kinase II; mutation of either of these serines results in upregulated EGFR tyrosine autophosphorylation (10).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).