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Mouse Dna Double-Strand Break Processing

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein ubiquitination is an important posttranslational modification that regulates protein function and fate (1). Ubiquitin (Ub) can be conjugated to target proteins in either monomeric or polymeric forms. There are several different lysine residues within Ub that can be used as conjugation sites for poly-Ub chain formation. Different poly-Ub linkages mediate different functions of the target protein ranging from alterations in protein function to degradation (2). UBE2N/Ubc13 is a ubiquitin-E2-conjugating enzyme that catalyzes K63-linked poly-Ub chain formation (1,2). UBE2N forms a heterodimer with MMS2 or Uev1A to exert its E2 ligase function. The UBE2N/MMS2 and UBE2N/Uev1A heterodimers catalyze different modes of target protein ubiquitination to mediate various signaling pathways (3-5) including: DNA damage and recombination, p53 and check point control, the cell cycle (6-10), immunoreceptor signaling (11,12), and endocytosis (13). Most recently, UBE2N was shown to play an important role in inflammatory signaling by promoting K63-linked ubiquitination and activation of IKK downstream of the IL-1β receptor (14). Furthermore, interaction of UBE2N with the Triad1 E3 protein-ubiquitin ligase was shown to play an important role in myelopoiesis (15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Protein ubiquitination is an important posttranslational modification that regulates protein function and fate (1). Ubiquitin (Ub) can be conjugated to target proteins in either monomeric or polymeric forms. There are several different lysine residues within Ub that can be used as conjugation sites for poly-Ub chain formation. Different poly-Ub linkages mediate different functions of the target protein ranging from alterations in protein function to degradation (2). UBE2N/Ubc13 is a ubiquitin-E2-conjugating enzyme that catalyzes K63-linked poly-Ub chain formation (1,2). UBE2N forms a heterodimer with MMS2 or Uev1A to exert its E2 ligase function. The UBE2N/MMS2 and UBE2N/Uev1A heterodimers catalyze different modes of target protein ubiquitination to mediate various signaling pathways (3-5) including: DNA damage and recombination, p53 and check point control, the cell cycle (6-10), immunoreceptor signaling (11,12), and endocytosis (13). Most recently, UBE2N was shown to play an important role in inflammatory signaling by promoting K63-linked ubiquitination and activation of IKK downstream of the IL-1β receptor (14). Furthermore, interaction of UBE2N with the Triad1 E3 protein-ubiquitin ligase was shown to play an important role in myelopoiesis (15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The cohesin complex consists of a heterodimer between SMC1 (SMC1A or B) and SMC3, bound by additional RAD21 and STAG proteins (STAG1, 2, or 3) (1,2). These proteins form a ring-like structure that mediates the cohesion of two sister chromatids after DNA replication in S phase (1,2). RAD21 and STAG2 are phosphorylated by Polo-like kinase (PLK) during prophase, which leads to the dissociation of cohesin complexes from the chromosome arms; however, cohesin remains bound to centromeres until anaphase (3,4). RAD21 is cleaved by separin/ESPL1 in anaphase, which leads to dissociation of the remaining cohesin from centromeres, enabling sister chromatids to segregate during mitosis (5). RAD21 is also cleaved by caspase-3 and caspase-7 during apoptosis, resulting in a 64 kDa carboxy-terminal cleavage product that translocates to the cytoplasm and may help to trigger apoptosis (6,7). In addition to mediating cohesion of sister chromatids, the cohesin complex plays important roles in gene regulation and DNA repair, as SMC1 and SMC3 are both phosphorylated by ATM and ATR kinases upon DNA damage (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The cohesin complex consists of a heterodimer between SMC1 (SMC1A or B) and SMC3, bound by additional RAD21 and STAG proteins (STAG1, 2, or 3) (1,2). These proteins form a ring-like structure that mediates the cohesion of two sister chromatids after DNA replication in S phase (1,2). RAD21 and STAG2 are phosphorylated by Polo-like kinase (PLK) during prophase, which leads to the dissociation of cohesin complexes from the chromosome arms; however, cohesin remains bound to centromeres until anaphase (3,4). RAD21 is cleaved by separin/ESPL1 in anaphase, which leads to dissociation of the remaining cohesin from centromeres, enabling sister chromatids to segregate during mitosis (5). RAD21 is also cleaved by caspase-3 and caspase-7 during apoptosis, resulting in a 64 kDa carboxy-terminal cleavage product that translocates to the cytoplasm and may help to trigger apoptosis (6,7). In addition to mediating cohesion of sister chromatids, the cohesin complex plays important roles in gene regulation and DNA repair, as SMC1 and SMC3 are both phosphorylated by ATM and ATR kinases upon DNA damage (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The cohesin complex consists of a heterodimer between SMC1 (SMC1A or B) and SMC3, bound by additional RAD21 and STAG proteins (STAG1, 2, or 3) (1,2). These proteins form a ring-like structure that mediates the cohesion of two sister chromatids after DNA replication in S phase (1,2). RAD21 and STAG2 are phosphorylated by Polo-like kinase (PLK) during prophase, which leads to the dissociation of cohesin complexes from the chromosome arms; however, cohesin remains bound to centromeres until anaphase (3,4). RAD21 is cleaved by separin/ESPL1 in anaphase, which leads to dissociation of the remaining cohesin from centromeres, enabling sister chromatids to segregate during mitosis (5). RAD21 is also cleaved by caspase-3 and caspase-7 during apoptosis, resulting in a 64 kDa carboxy-terminal cleavage product that translocates to the cytoplasm and may help to trigger apoptosis (6,7). In addition to mediating cohesion of sister chromatids, the cohesin complex plays important roles in gene regulation and DNA repair, as SMC1 and SMC3 are both phosphorylated by ATM and ATR kinases upon DNA damage (1,2).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: RPA70 (HSSB, REPA1, RF-A, RP-A, p70) is a component of a heterotrimeric complex, composed of 70, 32/30 and 14 kDa subunits, collectively known as RPA. RPA is a single stranded DNA binding protein, whose DNA binding activity is believed to reside entirely in the 70 kDa subunit. The complex is required for almost all aspects of cellular DNA metabolism such as DNA replication (1-3), recombination, cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints, and all major types of DNA repair including nucleotide excision, base excision, mismatch and double-strand break repairs (4-7). In response to genotoxic stress in eukaryotic cells, RPA has been shown to associate with the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1) checkpoint complex (8). RPA is hyperphosphorylated upon DNA damage or replication stress by checkpoint kinases including ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (9-11). Phosphorylation of RPA32 occurs at serines 4, 8 and 33 (11). Hyperphosphorylation may alter RPA-DNA and RPA-protein interactions. In addition to the checkpoint partners, RPA interacts with a wide variety of protein partners, including proteins required for normal replication such as RCF, PCNA and Pol α, and also proteins involved in SV40 replication, such as DNA polymerase I and SV40 large T antigen (10,12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM) is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair (1). Activation of ATM by autophosphorylation on Ser1981 occurs in response to exposed DNA double stranded breaks. ATM kinase regulates a number of proteins involved in cell cycle checkpoint control, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Known substrates include p53, Chk2, Chk1, CtIP, 4E-BP1, BRCA1, RPA3, H2A.X, SMC1, FANCD2, Rad17, Artemis, Nbs1, and the I-2 regulatory subunit of PP1 (1,2). Mutations in the corresponding ATM gene result in ataxia telangiectasia (AT), an autosomal recessive disease characterized by uncoordinated muscle movement and neurodegeneration. Cells from AT patients display defective DNA damage-induced checkpoint activation, sensitivity to radiation, and a higher frequency of chromosome breakage (3,4).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mink, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is characterized by growth retardation, mental disability, immunodeficiency, defects in cell cycle checkpoints, an increased propensity for cancer, and sensitivity to ionizing radiation (1). Repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks is dependent on the multifunctional MRN complex containing Mre11, Rad50, and the NBS1 gene product p95/NBS1 (also called p95 or nibrin) (2). p95/NBS1 is a protein with a forkhead-associated domain and a BRCT repeat that regulate interaction with MDC1 and are essential for proper G2/M DNA-damage checkpoint function (3). NBS1 is critical for homologous recombination following DNA double strand breaks. This activity requires CDK-dependent association with CtIP and subsequent phosphorylation by ATM (4). ATM interacts with and phosphorylates p95/NBS1 at Ser278 and Ser343 after exposure to ionizing radiation (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mink, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is characterized by growth retardation, mental disability, immunodeficiency, defects in cell cycle checkpoints, an increased propensity for cancer, and sensitivity to ionizing radiation (1). Repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks is dependent on the multifunctional MRN complex containing Mre11, Rad50, and the NBS1 gene product p95/NBS1 (also called p95 or nibrin) (2). p95/NBS1 is a protein with a forkhead-associated domain and a BRCT repeat that regulate interaction with MDC1 and are essential for proper G2/M DNA-damage checkpoint function (3). NBS1 is critical for homologous recombination following DNA double strand breaks. This activity requires CDK-dependent association with CtIP and subsequent phosphorylation by ATM (4). ATM interacts with and phosphorylates p95/NBS1 at Ser278 and Ser343 after exposure to ionizing radiation (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 26S proteasome is a highly abundant proteolytic complex involved in the degradation of ubiquitinated substrate proteins. It consists largely of two sub-complexes, the 20S catalytic core particle (CP) and the 19S/PA700 regulatory particle (RP) that can cap either end of the CP. The CP consists of two stacked heteroheptameric β-rings (β1-7) that contain three catalytic β-subunits and are flanked on either side by two heteroheptameric α-rings (α1-7). The RP includes a base and a lid, each having multiple subunits. The base, in part, is composed of a heterohexameric ring of ATPase subunits belonging to the AAA (ATPases Associated with diverse cellular Activities) family. The ATPase subunits function to unfold the substrate and open the gate formed by the α-subunits, thus exposing the unfolded substrate to the catalytic β-subunits. The lid consists of ubiquitin receptors and DUBs that function in recruitment of ubiquitinated substrates and modification of ubiquitin chain topology (1,2). Other modulators of proteasome activity, such as PA28/11S REG, can also bind to the end of the 20S CP and activate it (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is characterized by growth retardation, mental disability, immunodeficiency, defects in cell cycle checkpoints, an increased propensity for cancer, and sensitivity to ionizing radiation (1). Repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks is dependent on the multifunctional MRN complex containing Mre11, Rad50, and the NBS1 gene product p95/NBS1 (also called p95 or nibrin) (2). p95/NBS1 is a protein with a forkhead-associated domain and a BRCT repeat that regulate interaction with MDC1 and are essential for proper G2/M DNA-damage checkpoint function (3). NBS1 is critical for homologous recombination following DNA double strand breaks. This activity requires CDK-dependent association with CtIP and subsequent phosphorylation by ATM (4). ATM interacts with and phosphorylates p95/NBS1 at Ser278 and Ser343 after exposure to ionizing radiation (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Valosin-containing protein (VCP) is a highly conserved and abundant 97 kDa protein that belongs to the AAA (ATPase associated with a variety of cellular activities) family of proteins. VCP assembles as a homo-hexamer, forming a ring with a channel at its center (1,2,3). VCP homo-hexamers associate with a variety of protein cofactors to form many distinct protein complexes, which act as chaperones to unfold proteins and transport them to specific cellular compartments or to the proteosome (4). These protein complexes participate in many cellular functions, including vesicle transport and fusion, fragmentation and reassembly of the golgi stacks during mitosis, nuclear envelope formation and spindle disassembly following mitosis, cell cycle regulation, DNA damage repair, apoptosis, B- and T-cell activation, NF-κB-mediated transcriptional regulation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation and protein degradation (4). VCP appears to localize mainly to the endoplasmic reticulum; however, tyrosine phosphorylation is associated with relocalization to the centrosome during mitosis (5). In addition, following cellular exposure to ionizing radition, VCP is phosphorylated at Ser784 in an ATM-dependent manner and accumulates in the nucleus at sites of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) (6). Exposure to other types of DNA damaging agents such as UV light, bleomycin or doxorubicin results in phosphorylation of VCP by ATR and DNA-PK in an ATM-independent manner (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Valosin-containing protein (VCP) is a highly conserved and abundant 97 kDa protein that belongs to the AAA (ATPase associated with a variety of cellular activities) family of proteins. VCP assembles as a homo-hexamer, forming a ring with a channel at its center (1,2,3). VCP homo-hexamers associate with a variety of protein cofactors to form many distinct protein complexes, which act as chaperones to unfold proteins and transport them to specific cellular compartments or to the proteosome (4). These protein complexes participate in many cellular functions, including vesicle transport and fusion, fragmentation and reassembly of the golgi stacks during mitosis, nuclear envelope formation and spindle disassembly following mitosis, cell cycle regulation, DNA damage repair, apoptosis, B- and T-cell activation, NF-κB-mediated transcriptional regulation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation and protein degradation (4). VCP appears to localize mainly to the endoplasmic reticulum; however, tyrosine phosphorylation is associated with relocalization to the centrosome during mitosis (5). In addition, following cellular exposure to ionizing radition, VCP is phosphorylated at Ser784 in an ATM-dependent manner and accumulates in the nucleus at sites of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) (6). Exposure to other types of DNA damaging agents such as UV light, bleomycin or doxorubicin results in phosphorylation of VCP by ATR and DNA-PK in an ATM-independent manner (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Chk2 is the mammalian orthologue of the budding yeast Rad53 and fission yeast Cds1 checkpoint kinases (1-3). The amino-terminal domain of Chk2 contains a series of seven serine or threonine residues (Ser19, Thr26, Ser28, Ser33, Ser35, Ser50, and Thr68) each followed by glutamine (SQ or TQ motif). These are known to be preferred sites for phosphorylation by ATM/ATR kinases (4,5). After DNA damage by ionizing radiation (IR), UV irradiation, or hydroxyurea treatment, Thr68 and other sites in this region become phosphorylated by ATM/ATR (5-7). The SQ/TQ cluster domain, therefore, seems to have a regulatory function. Phosphorylation at Thr68 is a prerequisite for the subsequent activation step, which is attributable to autophosphorylation of Chk2 at residues Thr383 and Thr387 in the activation loop of the kinase domain (8).

$305
400 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is immobilized via covalent binding of primary amino groups to N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-activated Sepharose® beads. PARP (46D11) Rabbit mAb (Sepharose® Bead Conjugate) is useful for immunoprecipitation assays. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated PARP (46D11) Rabbit mAb #9532.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation

Background: PARP, a 116 kDa nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, appears to be involved in DNA repair in response to environmental stress (1). This protein can be cleaved by many ICE-like caspases in vitro (2,3) and is one of the main cleavage targets of caspase-3 in vivo (4,5). In human PARP, the cleavage occurs between Asp214 and Gly215, which separates the PARP amino-terminal DNA binding domain (24 kDa) from the carboxy-terminal catalytic domain (89 kDa) (2,4). PARP helps cells to maintain their viability; cleavage of PARP facilitates cellular disassembly and serves as a marker of cells undergoing apoptosis (6).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
CST's PathScan® Cleaved PARP (Asp214) Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of cleaved PARP (Asp214) protein. A cleaved PARP (Asp214) Rabbit mAb has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, cleaved PARP (Asp214) protein is captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, a biotinylated PARP Rabbit mAb is added to detect the captured cleaved PARP protein. HRP-linked Streptavidin is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of the absorbance for this developed color is proportional to the quantity of cleaved PARP (Asp214) protein.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Background: PARP, a 116 kDa nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, appears to be involved in DNA repair in response to environmental stress (1). This protein can be cleaved by many ICE-like caspases in vitro (2,3) and is one of the main cleavage targets of caspase-3 in vivo (4,5). In human PARP, the cleavage occurs between Asp214 and Gly215, which separates the PARP amino-terminal DNA binding domain (24 kDa) from the carboxy-terminal catalytic domain (89 kDa) (2,4). PARP helps cells to maintain their viability; cleavage of PARP facilitates cellular disassembly and serves as a marker of cells undergoing apoptosis (6).

$111
20 µl
$261
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PARP, a 116 kDa nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, appears to be involved in DNA repair in response to environmental stress (1). This protein can be cleaved by many ICE-like caspases in vitro (2,3) and is one of the main cleavage targets of caspase-3 in vivo (4,5). In human PARP, the cleavage occurs between Asp214 and Gly215, which separates the PARP amino-terminal DNA binding domain (24 kDa) from the carboxy-terminal catalytic domain (89 kDa) (2,4). PARP helps cells to maintain their viability; cleavage of PARP facilitates cellular disassembly and serves as a marker of cells undergoing apoptosis (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
$630
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: PARP, a 116 kDa nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, appears to be involved in DNA repair in response to environmental stress (1). This protein can be cleaved by many ICE-like caspases in vitro (2,3) and is one of the main cleavage targets of caspase-3 in vivo (4,5). In human PARP, the cleavage occurs between Asp214 and Gly215, which separates the PARP amino-terminal DNA binding domain (24 kDa) from the carboxy-terminal catalytic domain (89 kDa) (2,4). PARP helps cells to maintain their viability; cleavage of PARP facilitates cellular disassembly and serves as a marker of cells undergoing apoptosis (6).