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Mouse Mre11 Complex

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mre11, originally described in genetic screens from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which mutants were defective in meiotic recombination (1), is a central part of a multisubunit nuclease composed of Mre11, Rad50 and Nbs1 (MRN) (2,3). The MRN complex plays a critical role in sensing, processing and repairing DNA double strand breaks. Defects lead to genomic instability, telomere shortening, aberrant meiosis and hypersensitivity to DNA damage (4). Hypomorphic mutations of Mre11 are found in ataxia-telangiectasia-like disease (ATLD), with phenotypes similar to mutations in ATM that cause ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), including a predisposition to malignancy in humans (5). Cellular consequences of ATLD include chromosomal instability and defects in the intra-S phase and G2/M checkpoints in response to DNA damage. The MRN complex may directly activate the ATM checkpoint kinase at DNA breaks (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mink, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is characterized by growth retardation, mental disability, immunodeficiency, defects in cell cycle checkpoints, an increased propensity for cancer, and sensitivity to ionizing radiation (1). Repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks is dependent on the multifunctional MRN complex containing Mre11, Rad50, and the NBS1 gene product p95/NBS1 (also called p95 or nibrin) (2). p95/NBS1 is a protein with a forkhead-associated domain and a BRCT repeat that regulate interaction with MDC1 and are essential for proper G2/M DNA-damage checkpoint function (3). NBS1 is critical for homologous recombination following DNA double strand breaks. This activity requires CDK-dependent association with CtIP and subsequent phosphorylation by ATM (4). ATM interacts with and phosphorylates p95/NBS1 at Ser278 and Ser343 after exposure to ionizing radiation (5,6).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mink, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is characterized by growth retardation, mental disability, immunodeficiency, defects in cell cycle checkpoints, an increased propensity for cancer, and sensitivity to ionizing radiation (1). Repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks is dependent on the multifunctional MRN complex containing Mre11, Rad50, and the NBS1 gene product p95/NBS1 (also called p95 or nibrin) (2). p95/NBS1 is a protein with a forkhead-associated domain and a BRCT repeat that regulate interaction with MDC1 and are essential for proper G2/M DNA-damage checkpoint function (3). NBS1 is critical for homologous recombination following DNA double strand breaks. This activity requires CDK-dependent association with CtIP and subsequent phosphorylation by ATM (4). ATM interacts with and phosphorylates p95/NBS1 at Ser278 and Ser343 after exposure to ionizing radiation (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is characterized by growth retardation, mental disability, immunodeficiency, defects in cell cycle checkpoints, an increased propensity for cancer, and sensitivity to ionizing radiation (1). Repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks is dependent on the multifunctional MRN complex containing Mre11, Rad50, and the NBS1 gene product p95/NBS1 (also called p95 or nibrin) (2). p95/NBS1 is a protein with a forkhead-associated domain and a BRCT repeat that regulate interaction with MDC1 and are essential for proper G2/M DNA-damage checkpoint function (3). NBS1 is critical for homologous recombination following DNA double strand breaks. This activity requires CDK-dependent association with CtIP and subsequent phosphorylation by ATM (4). ATM interacts with and phosphorylates p95/NBS1 at Ser278 and Ser343 after exposure to ionizing radiation (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Telomeric repeat-binding factor 2-interacting protein (TERF2IP, also known as RAP1) is a component of the Shelterin Complex, a multi-protein complex that binds and organizes telomeres into T-loop structures to prevent them from being recognized by the cell as DNA double stranded breaks (1,2). The Shelterin Complex is composed of TERF2IP, TIN2 and TPP2 proteins, in addition to three DNA binding proteins that function to recruit the complex to telomeres: TRF1 and TRF2 bind double-stranded TTAGGG repeats found at telomeres, while the POT1 protein binds single-stranded TTAGGG repeats found at the very end of the telomeres (2). Together, these proteins function to protect telomeres and ensure proper replication and processing of chromosome ends. Recent studies have shown that TERF2IP is dispensable for maintenance of telomere length, organization of telomeric chromatin, and regulation of telomeric transcription (3,4). However, TERF2IP is required for inhibition of homology-directed repair (HDR), which can create undesirable telomeric sister chromatid exchange (3,4). In addition to its role in telomere maintenance, TERF2IP is also found in the cytoplasm, where it functions as an IκB kinase (IKK) adaptor protein and regulates NF-κB-dependent gene expression (5). TERF2IP forms a complex with IKKs and is critical for proper recruitment of IKKs to and activation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB. Elevated levels of TERF2IP have been found in breast cancer cells with NF-κB hyperactivity, and knockdown of TERF2IP sensitizes these cells to apoptosis, further identifying TERF2IP as a potential cancer therapeutic target (5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Telomeres, the linear ends of chromosomes, are organized into T-loops to prevent them from being recognized by the cell as DNA double stranded breaks (DSBs) (1). The telomeric repeat binding factor proteins TRF1 and TRF2 bind to double-stranded telomeres to allow formation of T-loops (2). A large number of proteins involved in the DNA damage response are found physically associated with TRF2 within telomeres (3). Interestingly, TRF2 can transiently localize to DNA damage-induced DSBs, but overexpression of TRF2 prevents ATM-dependent signaling (4). Phosphorylation of TRF2 at Ser323 has been reported in vivo, but no upstream kinase or role has been established for this phosphorylation site (5).