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Mouse Positive Regulation of Striated Muscle Cell Differentiation

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Heregulin (HRG), also called neuregulin (NRG1), neu differentiation factor (NDF) or glial growth factor-2 (GGF-2), is a soluble growth factor synthesized as a transmembrane precursor molecule. Metalloproteinases and other proteases catalyze the cleavage of its extracellular domain which is then released and functions as a ligand for ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptor tyrosine kinase. The signaling pathways of HRG-ErbB3/ErbB4 are involved in regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, invasion, and survival of both normal and malignant tissues (1,2). Abnormality of HRG-ErbB signaling leads to development of a variety of human diseases.HRG family has four isoforms including HRG-1, -2, -3 and -4, which are derived from alternative exon splicing. Moreover, they showed various tissue expression and biological activities (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are involved in maintaining the silenced state of several developmentally regulated genes and contribute to the maintenance of cell identity, cell cycle regulation, and oncogenesis (1,2). Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), a member of this large protein family, contains four conserved regions including domain I, domain II, and a cysteine-rich amino acid stretch that precedes the carboxy-terminal SET domain (3). The SET domain has been linked with histone methyltransferase (HMTase) activity. Moreover, mammalian Ezh2 is a member of a histone deacetylase complex that functions in gene silencing, acting at the level of chromatin structure (4). Ezh2 complexes methylate histone H3 at Lys9 and 27 in vitro, which is thought to be involved in targeting transcriptional regulators to specific loci (5). Ezh2 is deregulated in various tumor types, and its role, both as a primary effector and as a mediator of tumorigenesis, has become a subject of increased interest (6).

$122
20 µl
$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Chromatin IP-seq, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are involved in maintaining the silenced state of several developmentally regulated genes and contribute to the maintenance of cell identity, cell cycle regulation, and oncogenesis (1,2). Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), a member of this large protein family, contains four conserved regions including domain I, domain II, and a cysteine-rich amino acid stretch that precedes the carboxy-terminal SET domain (3). The SET domain has been linked with histone methyltransferase (HMTase) activity. Moreover, mammalian Ezh2 is a member of a histone deacetylase complex that functions in gene silencing, acting at the level of chromatin structure (4). Ezh2 complexes methylate histone H3 at Lys9 and 27 in vitro, which is thought to be involved in targeting transcriptional regulators to specific loci (5). Ezh2 is deregulated in various tumor types, and its role, both as a primary effector and as a mediator of tumorigenesis, has become a subject of increased interest (6).

$348
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Ezh2 (D2C9) XP® Rabbit mAb #5246.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are involved in maintaining the silenced state of several developmentally regulated genes and contribute to the maintenance of cell identity, cell cycle regulation, and oncogenesis (1,2). Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), a member of this large protein family, contains four conserved regions including domain I, domain II, and a cysteine-rich amino acid stretch that precedes the carboxy-terminal SET domain (3). The SET domain has been linked with histone methyltransferase (HMTase) activity. Moreover, mammalian Ezh2 is a member of a histone deacetylase complex that functions in gene silencing, acting at the level of chromatin structure (4). Ezh2 complexes methylate histone H3 at Lys9 and 27 in vitro, which is thought to be involved in targeting transcriptional regulators to specific loci (5). Ezh2 is deregulated in various tumor types, and its role, both as a primary effector and as a mediator of tumorigenesis, has become a subject of increased interest (6).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Ezh2 (D2C9) XP® Rabbit mAb #5246.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are involved in maintaining the silenced state of several developmentally regulated genes and contribute to the maintenance of cell identity, cell cycle regulation, and oncogenesis (1,2). Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), a member of this large protein family, contains four conserved regions including domain I, domain II, and a cysteine-rich amino acid stretch that precedes the carboxy-terminal SET domain (3). The SET domain has been linked with histone methyltransferase (HMTase) activity. Moreover, mammalian Ezh2 is a member of a histone deacetylase complex that functions in gene silencing, acting at the level of chromatin structure (4). Ezh2 complexes methylate histone H3 at Lys9 and 27 in vitro, which is thought to be involved in targeting transcriptional regulators to specific loci (5). Ezh2 is deregulated in various tumor types, and its role, both as a primary effector and as a mediator of tumorigenesis, has become a subject of increased interest (6).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry and immunofluorescent analysis in human cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Ezh2 (D2C9) XP® Rabbit mAb #5246.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are involved in maintaining the silenced state of several developmentally regulated genes and contribute to the maintenance of cell identity, cell cycle regulation, and oncogenesis (1,2). Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), a member of this large protein family, contains four conserved regions including domain I, domain II, and a cysteine-rich amino acid stretch that precedes the carboxy-terminal SET domain (3). The SET domain has been linked with histone methyltransferase (HMTase) activity. Moreover, mammalian Ezh2 is a member of a histone deacetylase complex that functions in gene silencing, acting at the level of chromatin structure (4). Ezh2 complexes methylate histone H3 at Lys9 and 27 in vitro, which is thought to be involved in targeting transcriptional regulators to specific loci (5). Ezh2 is deregulated in various tumor types, and its role, both as a primary effector and as a mediator of tumorigenesis, has become a subject of increased interest (6).

$348
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Ezh2 (D2C9) XP® Rabbit mAb #5246.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are involved in maintaining the silenced state of several developmentally regulated genes and contribute to the maintenance of cell identity, cell cycle regulation, and oncogenesis (1,2). Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), a member of this large protein family, contains four conserved regions including domain I, domain II, and a cysteine-rich amino acid stretch that precedes the carboxy-terminal SET domain (3). The SET domain has been linked with histone methyltransferase (HMTase) activity. Moreover, mammalian Ezh2 is a member of a histone deacetylase complex that functions in gene silencing, acting at the level of chromatin structure (4). Ezh2 complexes methylate histone H3 at Lys9 and 27 in vitro, which is thought to be involved in targeting transcriptional regulators to specific loci (5). Ezh2 is deregulated in various tumor types, and its role, both as a primary effector and as a mediator of tumorigenesis, has become a subject of increased interest (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are involved in maintaining the silenced state of several developmentally regulated genes and contribute to the maintenance of cell identity, cell cycle regulation, and oncogenesis (1,2). Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), a member of this large protein family, contains four conserved regions including domain I, domain II, and a cysteine-rich amino acid stretch that precedes the carboxy-terminal SET domain (3). The SET domain has been linked with histone methyltransferase (HMTase) activity. Moreover, mammalian Ezh2 is a member of a histone deacetylase complex that functions in gene silencing, acting at the level of chromatin structure (4). Ezh2 complexes methylate histone H3 at Lys9 and 27 in vitro, which is thought to be involved in targeting transcriptional regulators to specific loci (5). Ezh2 is deregulated in various tumor types, and its role, both as a primary effector and as a mediator of tumorigenesis, has become a subject of increased interest (6).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugate dEzh2 (AC22) Mouse mAb #3147.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are involved in maintaining the silenced state of several developmentally regulated genes and contribute to the maintenance of cell identity, cell cycle regulation, and oncogenesis (1,2). Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), a member of this large protein family, contains four conserved regions including domain I, domain II, and a cysteine-rich amino acid stretch that precedes the carboxy-terminal SET domain (3). The SET domain has been linked with histone methyltransferase (HMTase) activity. Moreover, mammalian Ezh2 is a member of a histone deacetylase complex that functions in gene silencing, acting at the level of chromatin structure (4). Ezh2 complexes methylate histone H3 at Lys9 and 27 in vitro, which is thought to be involved in targeting transcriptional regulators to specific loci (5). Ezh2 is deregulated in various tumor types, and its role, both as a primary effector and as a mediator of tumorigenesis, has become a subject of increased interest (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB1) belongs to a family of evolutionarily conserved, multifunctional Y-box proteins that bind single-stranded DNA and RNA and function as regulators of transcription, RNA metabolism, and protein synthesis (1). YB1 binds to Y-box sequences (TAACC) found in multiple gene promoters and can positively or negatively regulate transcription. YB1 activates genes associated with proliferation and cancer, such as cyclin A, cyclin B1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), and the multi-drug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene (2-4). YB1 represses genes associated with cell death, including the Fas cell death-associated receptor and the p53 tumor suppressor gene (5-7). It also interacts with the RNA-splicing factor SRp30c and stabilizes interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA upon induction of T lymphocytes by IL-2 (8,9). The majority of YB1 protein localizes to the cytoplasm, with a minor pool found in the nucleus; however, nuclear localization appears to be critical for its role in promoting proliferation. Nuclear translocation is cell cycle regulated, with YB1 protein accumulating in the nucleus during G1/S phase (2). In addition, nuclear translocation is induced in response to extracellular stimuli such as hyperthermia and UV irradiation, or treatment of cells with thrombin, interferons, or insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) (2,10). Treatment of the MCF7 breast cancer cell line with IGF-I results in Akt-mediated phosphorylation of YB1 at Ser102, which is required for nuclear translocation of YB1 and its ability to promote anchorage-independent growth (10). Research studies have shown that YB1 is overexpressed in many malignant tissues, including breast cancer, non-small cell lung carcinoma, ovarian adenocarcinomas, human osteosarcomas, colorectal carcinomas, and malignant melanomas. Investigators have shown that nuclear YB1 expression correlates with high levels of proliferation, drug resistance, and poor tumor prognosis (2,7,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily members are critical regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation, developmental patterning and morphogenesis, and disease pathogenesis (1-4). TGF-β elicits signaling through three cell surface receptors: type I (RI), type II (RII), and type III (RIII). Type I and type II receptors are serine/threonine kinases that form a heteromeric complex. In response to ligand binding, the type II receptors form a stable complex with the type I receptors allowing phosphorylation and activation of type I receptor kinases (5). The type III receptor, also known as betaglycan, is a transmembrane proteoglycan with a large extracellular domain that binds TGF-β with high affinity but lacks a cytoplasmic signaling domain (6,7). Expression of the type III receptor can regulate TGF-β signaling through presentation of the ligand to the signaling complex. The only known direct TGF-β signaling effectors are the Smad family proteins, which transduce signals from the cell surface directly to the nucleus to regulate target gene transcription (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB1) belongs to a family of evolutionarily conserved, multifunctional Y-box proteins that bind single-stranded DNA and RNA and function as regulators of transcription, RNA metabolism, and protein synthesis (1). YB1 binds to Y-box sequences (TAACC) found in multiple gene promoters and can positively or negatively regulate transcription. YB1 activates genes associated with proliferation and cancer, such as cyclin A, cyclin B1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), and the multi-drug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene (2-4). YB1 represses genes associated with cell death, including the Fas cell death-associated receptor and the p53 tumor suppressor gene (5-7). It also interacts with the RNA-splicing factor SRp30c and stabilizes interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA upon induction of T lymphocytes by IL-2 (8,9). The majority of YB1 protein localizes to the cytoplasm, with a minor pool found in the nucleus; however, nuclear localization appears to be critical for its role in promoting proliferation. Nuclear translocation is cell cycle regulated, with YB1 protein accumulating in the nucleus during G1/S phase (2). In addition, nuclear translocation is induced in response to extracellular stimuli such as hyperthermia and UV irradiation, or treatment of cells with thrombin, interferons, or insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) (2,10). Treatment of the MCF7 breast cancer cell line with IGF-I results in Akt-mediated phosphorylation of YB1 at Ser102, which is required for nuclear translocation of YB1 and its ability to promote anchorage-independent growth (10). Research studies have shown that YB1 is overexpressed in many malignant tissues, including breast cancer, non-small cell lung carcinoma, ovarian adenocarcinomas, human osteosarcomas, colorectal carcinomas, and malignant melanomas. Investigators have shown that nuclear YB1 expression correlates with high levels of proliferation, drug resistance, and poor tumor prognosis (2,7,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB1) belongs to a family of evolutionarily conserved, multifunctional Y-box proteins that bind single-stranded DNA and RNA and function as regulators of transcription, RNA metabolism, and protein synthesis (1). YB1 binds to Y-box sequences (TAACC) found in multiple gene promoters and can positively or negatively regulate transcription. YB1 activates genes associated with proliferation and cancer, such as cyclin A, cyclin B1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), and the multi-drug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene (2-4). YB1 represses genes associated with cell death, including the Fas cell death-associated receptor and the p53 tumor suppressor gene (5-7). It also interacts with the RNA-splicing factor SRp30c and stabilizes interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA upon induction of T lymphocytes by IL-2 (8,9). The majority of YB1 protein localizes to the cytoplasm, with a minor pool found in the nucleus; however, nuclear localization appears to be critical for its role in promoting proliferation. Nuclear translocation is cell cycle regulated, with YB1 protein accumulating in the nucleus during G1/S phase (2). In addition, nuclear translocation is induced in response to extracellular stimuli such as hyperthermia and UV irradiation, or treatment of cells with thrombin, interferons, or insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) (2,10). Treatment of the MCF7 breast cancer cell line with IGF-I results in Akt-mediated phosphorylation of YB1 at Ser102, which is required for nuclear translocation of YB1 and its ability to promote anchorage-independent growth (10). Research studies have shown that YB1 is overexpressed in many malignant tissues, including breast cancer, non-small cell lung carcinoma, ovarian adenocarcinomas, human osteosarcomas, colorectal carcinomas, and malignant melanomas. Investigators have shown that nuclear YB1 expression correlates with high levels of proliferation, drug resistance, and poor tumor prognosis (2,7,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB1) belongs to a family of evolutionarily conserved, multifunctional Y-box proteins that bind single-stranded DNA and RNA and function as regulators of transcription, RNA metabolism, and protein synthesis (1). YB1 binds to Y-box sequences (TAACC) found in multiple gene promoters and can positively or negatively regulate transcription. YB1 activates genes associated with proliferation and cancer, such as cyclin A, cyclin B1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), and the multi-drug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene (2-4). YB1 represses genes associated with cell death, including the Fas cell death-associated receptor and the p53 tumor suppressor gene (5-7). It also interacts with the RNA-splicing factor SRp30c and stabilizes interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA upon induction of T lymphocytes by IL-2 (8,9). The majority of YB1 protein localizes to the cytoplasm, with a minor pool found in the nucleus; however, nuclear localization appears to be critical for its role in promoting proliferation. Nuclear translocation is cell cycle regulated, with YB1 protein accumulating in the nucleus during G1/S phase (2). In addition, nuclear translocation is induced in response to extracellular stimuli such as hyperthermia and UV irradiation, or treatment of cells with thrombin, interferons, or insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) (2,10). Treatment of the MCF7 breast cancer cell line with IGF-I results in Akt-mediated phosphorylation of YB1 at Ser102, which is required for nuclear translocation of YB1 and its ability to promote anchorage-independent growth (10). Research studies have shown that YB1 is overexpressed in many malignant tissues, including breast cancer, non-small cell lung carcinoma, ovarian adenocarcinomas, human osteosarcomas, colorectal carcinomas, and malignant melanomas. Investigators have shown that nuclear YB1 expression correlates with high levels of proliferation, drug resistance, and poor tumor prognosis (2,7,10).

$489
96 assays
1 Kit
The PathScan® Total YB1 Sandwich ELISA Kit is a solid phase sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects endogenous levels of YB1 protein. A YB1 rabbit antibody has been coated onto the microwells. After incubation with cell lysates, YB1 protein is captured by the coated antibody. Following extensive washing, a YB1 mouse detection antibody is added to detect the captured YB1 protein. Anti-mouse IgG, HRP-linked antibody is then used to recognize the bound detection antibody. HRP substrate, TMB, is added to develop color. The magnitude of the absorbance for the developed color is proportional to the quantity of YB1 protein.Antibodies in kit are custom formulations specific to kit.
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Background: The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB1) belongs to a family of evolutionarily conserved, multifunctional Y-box proteins that bind single-stranded DNA and RNA and function as regulators of transcription, RNA metabolism, and protein synthesis (1). YB1 binds to Y-box sequences (TAACC) found in multiple gene promoters and can positively or negatively regulate transcription. YB1 activates genes associated with proliferation and cancer, such as cyclin A, cyclin B1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), and the multi-drug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene (2-4). YB1 represses genes associated with cell death, including the Fas cell death-associated receptor and the p53 tumor suppressor gene (5-7). It also interacts with the RNA-splicing factor SRp30c and stabilizes interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA upon induction of T lymphocytes by IL-2 (8,9). The majority of YB1 protein localizes to the cytoplasm, with a minor pool found in the nucleus; however, nuclear localization appears to be critical for its role in promoting proliferation. Nuclear translocation is cell cycle regulated, with YB1 protein accumulating in the nucleus during G1/S phase (2). In addition, nuclear translocation is induced in response to extracellular stimuli such as hyperthermia and UV irradiation, or treatment of cells with thrombin, interferons, or insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) (2,10). Treatment of the MCF7 breast cancer cell line with IGF-I results in Akt-mediated phosphorylation of YB1 at Ser102, which is required for nuclear translocation of YB1 and its ability to promote anchorage-independent growth (10). Research studies have shown that YB1 is overexpressed in many malignant tissues, including breast cancer, non-small cell lung carcinoma, ovarian adenocarcinomas, human osteosarcomas, colorectal carcinomas, and malignant melanomas. Investigators have shown that nuclear YB1 expression correlates with high levels of proliferation, drug resistance, and poor tumor prognosis (2,7,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The megakaryoblastic leukemia proteins 1 and 2 (MKL1, MKL2) are myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTF-A, MRTF-B) that serve as actin-regulated transcription coactivators for the serum response factor (SRF). Interaction between G-actin and MKL proteins retains the coactivator within the cytoplasm of resting cells. Activated Rho-A promotes F-actin assembly and a reduction of the G-actin pool in serum-stimulated cells. This results in the accumulation of MKL proteins in the nucleus, where the coactivator associates with the SRF to activate target gene transcription and mediate multiple cellular processes (1-4). A number of other signaling pathways, including the TGFβ, BMP, and PDGF pathways, also make use of MKL-mediated activation of target gene transcription (5-9). Chromosomal translocations involving the genes encoding MKL1 and MKL2 have been identified in several cases of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia and chondroid lipoma (10-12).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: JNK-Interacting Proteins (JIPs), as their name implies, coordinate c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) signaling by acting as scaffolds for components of the JNK signaling cascade (1). JIPs localize and promote JNK activation in response to stress by amalgamating and co-localizing upstream kinases and downstream effectors in the stress-kinase pathway analogous to the mechanism by which AKAPs orchestrate PKA signaling. JIPs bind to an array of MAPKs and other signaling proteins, including the mixed-lineage kinases, MKK7, p38α MAPK, JNK1-3, Max, Myc, NF-κB, LRRK2, and others (1-4).There are four known JIPs, JIP1-4, of which JIP1 and JIP2 share extensive sequence homology and domain structure. JIP1 and JIP2 are mainly expressed in neurons, testis and in β pancreatic cells, where they have been implicated in cellular responses to metabolic stress, the development of diabetes, and post-traumatic brain damage (5-7). Although architecturally distinct from JIP1 and JIP2, JIP3 and JIP4 share some overlapping functions and are more broadly expressed. JIP4, encoded by the SPAG9 (sperm-associated antigen-9) gene, is a homooligomer that binds to and coordinates the activation of numerous components of the stress-activated kinase cascade including MEK4, MEKK3, p38α MAPK, and JNK1-3 (3,8). However, unlike the other JIP members, JIP4 does not appear to activate JNK directly, instead favoring stimulation of p38 MAPK signaling events in response to cellular stress (3,9).In addition to mediating stress responses, JIP4 (or its splice variant, JLP) has also been shown to interact with ARF6 and PIKfyve, thus regulating microtubule-based endosomal trafficking (10,11). There are extensive reports indicating that JIP4 is phosphorylated in response to stress (UV damage etc.) but it is unclear what effect, if any, this has on its function, localization, or binding properties (12-15).

$348
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated p38 MAPK (D13E1) XP® Rabbit mAb #8690.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: p38 MAP kinase (MAPK), also called RK (1) or CSBP (2), is the mammalian orthologue of the yeast HOG kinase that participates in a signaling cascade controlling cellular responses to cytokines and stress (1-4). Four isoforms of p38 MAPK, p38α, β, γ (also known as Erk6 or SAPK3), and δ (also known as SAPK4) have been identified. Similar to the SAPK/JNK pathway, p38 MAPK is activated by a variety of cellular stresses including osmotic shock, inflammatory cytokines, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), UV light, and growth factors (1-5). MKK3, MKK6, and SEK activate p38 MAPK by phosphorylation at Thr180 and Tyr182. Activated p38 MAPK has been shown to phosphorylate and activate MAPKAP kinase 2 (3) and to phosphorylate the transcription factors ATF-2 (5), Max (6), and MEF2 (5-8). SB203580 (4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)-imidazole) is a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK. This compound inhibits the activation of MAPKAPK-2 by p38 MAPK and subsequent phosphorylation of HSP27 (9). SB203580 inhibits p38 MAPK catalytic activity by binding to the ATP-binding pocket, but does not inhibit phosphorylation of p38 MAPK by upstream kinases (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$327
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology (CST) antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The unconjugated Phospho-p38 MAPK (Thr180/Tyr182) (3D7) Rabbit mAb #9215 reacts with human, mouse, rat, monkey, pig, S. cerevisiae, and D. melanogaster phospho-p38 MAP kinase (Thr180/Tyr182). CST expects that Phospho-p38 MAP Kinase (Thr180/Tyr182) (3D7) Rabbit mAb (Biotinylated) will also recognize phospho-p38 MAP kinase (Thr180/Tyr182) in these species.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat, S. cerevisiae

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: p38 MAP kinase (MAPK), also called RK (1) or CSBP (2), is the mammalian orthologue of the yeast HOG kinase that participates in a signaling cascade controlling cellular responses to cytokines and stress (1-4). Four isoforms of p38 MAPK, p38α, β, γ (also known as Erk6 or SAPK3), and δ (also known as SAPK4) have been identified. Similar to the SAPK/JNK pathway, p38 MAPK is activated by a variety of cellular stresses including osmotic shock, inflammatory cytokines, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), UV light, and growth factors (1-5). MKK3, MKK6, and SEK activate p38 MAPK by phosphorylation at Thr180 and Tyr182. Activated p38 MAPK has been shown to phosphorylate and activate MAPKAP kinase 2 (3) and to phosphorylate the transcription factors ATF-2 (5), Max (6), and MEF2 (5-8). SB203580 (4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)-imidazole) is a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK. This compound inhibits the activation of MAPKAPK-2 by p38 MAPK and subsequent phosphorylation of HSP27 (9). SB203580 inhibits p38 MAPK catalytic activity by binding to the ATP-binding pocket, but does not inhibit phosphorylation of p38 MAPK by upstream kinases (10).