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Mouse Regulation of Lipid Transport

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Low density lipoprotein receptor related protein 1 ( LRP1) is a type I transmembrane receptor that mediates the endocytosis of various ligands (1). LRP1 plays important roles in lipid homeostasis, signaling transduction, embryonic development, and glucose metabolism (2-6). In addition, LRP1 regulates APP processing and facilitates the clearance of beta-amyloid (7-9). This finding makes LRP1 a potential therapeutic target for Alzheimer’s disease. LRP1 preprotein is proteolytically processed by furin to generate a 515 kDa extracellular α subunit and a membrane-anchored 85 kDa β subunit, which together form the mature receptor (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Integrins are heterodimeric cell surface receptors that play a pivotal role in cell adhesion and migration, as well as in growth and survival (1,2). The integrin family contains at least 18 α and 8 β subunits that form 24 known integrins with distinct tissue distribution and overlapping ligand specificities (3). Integrins not only transmit signals to cells in response to the extracellular environment (outside-in signaling), but also sense intracellular cues to alter their interaction with the extracellular environment (inside-out signaling) (1,2). αIIβ3 and αVβ3 are the two β3 containing integrins which are prominently expressed in hematopoietic cells and angiogenic endothelic cells and perform adhesive functions in hemostasis, wound healing and angiogenesis (1,4). Tyr773 and Tyr785 (usually referred to as Tyr747 and Tyr759 based on the chicken sequence) are phosphorylated upon ligand binding (5). Phosphorylation of these tyrosine residues is required for certain ligand-induced signaling (6). Thr779 (corresponding to Thr753 of the chicken sequence) of integrin β3 in the platelet specific αIIβ3 is phosphorylated by PKD and/or Akt, which may modulate integrin association with other signaling molecules (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Integrins are α/β heterodimeric cell surface receptors that play a pivotal role in cell adhesion and migration, as well as in growth and survival (1,2). The integrin family contains at least 18 α and 8 β subunits that form 24 known integrins with distinct tissue distribution and overlaping ligand specificities (3). Integrins not only transmit signals to cells in response to the extracellular environment (outside-in signaling), but also sense intracellular cues to alter their interaction with the extracellular environment (inside-out signaling) (1,2).Several αV subfamily members, including αVβ3, αVβ5, αVβ1, are highly expressed in active endothelial cells and cancer cells (3-6) where they play a critical role in angiogenesis and tumor metastasis (7-9). Therefore, interest has focused on αV integrin as a key therapeutic target in the treatment of cancer (10-12).

$129
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Integrins are heterodimeric cell surface receptors that play a pivotal role in cell adhesion and migration, as well as in growth and survival (1,2). The integrin family contains at least 18 α and 8 β subunits that form 24 known integrins with distinct tissue distribution and overlapping ligand specificities (3). Integrins not only transmit signals to cells in response to the extracellular environment (outside-in signaling), but also sense intracellular cues to alter their interaction with the extracellular environment (inside-out signaling) (1,2). αIIβ3 and αVβ3 are the two β3 containing integrins which are prominently expressed in hematopoietic cells and angiogenic endothelic cells and perform adhesive functions in hemostasis, wound healing and angiogenesis (1,4). Tyr773 and Tyr785 (usually referred to as Tyr747 and Tyr759 based on the chicken sequence) are phosphorylated upon ligand binding (5). Phosphorylation of these tyrosine residues is required for certain ligand-induced signaling (6). Thr779 (corresponding to Thr753 of the chicken sequence) of integrin β3 in the platelet specific αIIβ3 is phosphorylated by PKD and/or Akt, which may modulate integrin association with other signaling molecules (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Parkin is a protein of 465 amino acids with an amino-terminal ubiquitin domain and a carboxy-terminal RING-box (1). In the case of autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinsonism (AR-JP), deletions have been found in the gene on chromosome 6 encoding the protein Parkin (2).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Parkin is a protein of 465 amino acids with an amino-terminal ubiquitin domain and a carboxy-terminal RING-box (1). In the case of autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinsonism (AR-JP), deletions have been found in the gene on chromosome 6 encoding the protein Parkin (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apolipoproteins are plasma lipoproteins that function as transporters of lipids and cholesterol in the circulatory system. Chylomicrons are a fundamental class of apolipoproteins containing very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), intermediate-density lipoproteins (IDL), low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Sigma non-opioid intracellular receptor 1 (SIGMAR1) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane chaperone that forms raft-like microdomains on the ER, where it interacts with mitochondria at the mitochondria-associated ER membrane domain (MAM). At MAM, SIGMAR1 maintains proper ER-mitochondrion Ca2+ signaling, regulates mitochondria function, and enhances cellular survival upon ER stress (1-4). When activated, SIGMAR1 translocates to ER and plasma membrane, where it interacts with a plethora of membrane proteins, including ion channels, neurotransmitter receptors, and kinases. SIGMAR1 also modulates a variety of neuronal functions, such as neuronal excitability, neuroplasticity, neuroprotection, and neurorestoration (5-7). SIGMAR1 binds to many anti-psychotic drugs and it is implicated in addiction, pain, neurodegenerative diseases, and depression (8-11). Recently, mutations in the SIGMAR1 gene have been reported to be associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (12,13). Besides its important roles in central nervous system and peripheral nervous system, SIGMAR1 also enhances cancer cell migration and invasion (14,15).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Sigma non-opioid intracellular receptor 1 (SIGMAR1) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane chaperone that forms raft-like microdomains on the ER, where it interacts with mitochondria at the mitochondria-associated ER membrane domain (MAM). At MAM, SIGMAR1 maintains proper ER-mitochondrion Ca2+ signaling, regulates mitochondria function, and enhances cellular survival upon ER stress (1-4). When activated, SIGMAR1 translocates to ER and plasma membrane, where it interacts with a plethora of membrane proteins, including ion channels, neurotransmitter receptors, and kinases. SIGMAR1 also modulates a variety of neuronal functions, such as neuronal excitability, neuroplasticity, neuroprotection, and neurorestoration (5-7). SIGMAR1 binds to many anti-psychotic drugs and it is implicated in addiction, pain, neurodegenerative diseases, and depression (8-11). Recently, mutations in the SIGMAR1 gene have been reported to be associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (12,13). Besides its important roles in central nervous system and peripheral nervous system, SIGMAR1 also enhances cancer cell migration and invasion (14,15).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: The maintenance of glucose homeostasis is an essential physiological process that is regulated by hormones. An elevation in blood glucose levels during feeding stimulates insulin release from pancreatic β cells through a glucose sensing pathway (1). Insulin is synthesized as a precursor molecule, proinsulin, which is processed prior to secretion. A- and B-peptides are joined together by a disulfide bond to form insulin, while the central portion of the precursor molecule is cleaved and released as the C-peptide. Insulin stimulates glucose uptake from blood into skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Insulin deficiency leads to type 1 diabetes mellitus (2).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 488 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in rat cells and flow cytometry in human and mouse cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Insulin (C27C9) Rabbit mAb #3014.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: The maintenance of glucose homeostasis is an essential physiological process that is regulated by hormones. An elevation in blood glucose levels during feeding stimulates insulin release from pancreatic β cells through a glucose sensing pathway (1). Insulin is synthesized as a precursor molecule, proinsulin, which is processed prior to secretion. A- and B-peptides are joined together by a disulfide bond to form insulin, while the central portion of the precursor molecule is cleaved and released as the C-peptide. Insulin stimulates glucose uptake from blood into skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Insulin deficiency leads to type 1 diabetes mellitus (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: The maintenance of glucose homeostasis is an essential physiological process that is regulated by hormones. An elevation in blood glucose levels during feeding stimulates insulin release from pancreatic β cells through a glucose sensing pathway (1). Insulin is synthesized as a precursor molecule, proinsulin, which is processed prior to secretion. A- and B-peptides are joined together by a disulfide bond to form insulin, while the central portion of the precursor molecule is cleaved and released as the C-peptide. Insulin stimulates glucose uptake from blood into skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Insulin deficiency leads to type 1 diabetes mellitus (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TNF-α, the prototypical member of the TNF protein superfamily, is a homotrimeric type-II membrane protein (1,2). Membrane-bound TNF-α is cleaved by the metalloprotease TACE/ADAM17 to generate a soluble homotrimer (2). Both membrane and soluble forms of TNF-α are biologically active. TNF-α is produced by a variety of immune cells including T cells, B cells, NK cells, and macrophages (1). Cellular response to TNF-α is mediated through interaction with receptors TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 and results in activation of pathways that favor both cell survival and apoptosis depending on the cell type and biological context. Activation of kinase pathways (including JNK, Erk1/2, p38 MAPK, and NF-κB) promotes the survival of cells, while TNF-α-mediated activation of caspase-8 leads to programmed cell death (1,2). TNF-α plays a key regulatory role in inflammation and host defense against bacterial infection, notably Mycobacterium tuberculosis (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: Glucose homeostasis is regulated by hormones. Elevation of blood glucose levels during feeding stimulates insulin release from pancreatic β-cells through a glucose sensing pathway (1). Proinsulin, the insulin precursor molecule, is processed prior to its secretion. Insulin is composed of A-peptide and B-peptide which are joined by a disulfide bond. The center one-third of the molecule is cleaved and released as C-peptide, which has a longer half-life than insulin (2).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human and mouse cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Insulin (C27C9) Rabbit mAb #3014.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: The maintenance of glucose homeostasis is an essential physiological process that is regulated by hormones. An elevation in blood glucose levels during feeding stimulates insulin release from pancreatic β cells through a glucose sensing pathway (1). Insulin is synthesized as a precursor molecule, proinsulin, which is processed prior to secretion. A- and B-peptides are joined together by a disulfide bond to form insulin, while the central portion of the precursor molecule is cleaved and released as the C-peptide. Insulin stimulates glucose uptake from blood into skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Insulin deficiency leads to type 1 diabetes mellitus (2).

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 647 fluorescent dye and tested in-house for direct immunofluorescent analysis in rat cells and flow cytometry in mouse cells. The antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Insulin (C27C9) Rabbit mAb #3014.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen)

Background: The maintenance of glucose homeostasis is an essential physiological process that is regulated by hormones. An elevation in blood glucose levels during feeding stimulates insulin release from pancreatic β cells through a glucose sensing pathway (1). Insulin is synthesized as a precursor molecule, proinsulin, which is processed prior to secretion. A- and B-peptides are joined together by a disulfide bond to form insulin, while the central portion of the precursor molecule is cleaved and released as the C-peptide. Insulin stimulates glucose uptake from blood into skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Insulin deficiency leads to type 1 diabetes mellitus (2).