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Mouse Regulation of Protein Phosphatase Type 2a Activity

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) is an essential protein serine/threonine phosphatase that is conserved in all eukaryotes. PP2A is a key enzyme within various signal transduction pathways as it regulates fundamental cellular activities such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, metabolism, cell cycle progression, cell division, apoptosis and development (1-3). The core enzyme consists of catalytic C and regulatory A (or PR65) subunits, with each subunit represented by α and β isoforms (1). Additional regulatory subunits belong to four different families of unrelated proteins. Both the B (or PR55) and B' regulatory protein families contain α, β, γ and δ isoforms, with the B' family also including an ε protein. B'' family proteins include PR72, PR130, PR59 and PR48 isoforms, while striatin (PR110) and SG2NA (PR93) are both members of the B''' regulatory protein family. These B subunits competitively bind to a shared binding site on the core A subunit (1). This variable array of holoenzyme components, particularly regulatory B subunits, allows PP2A to act in a diverse set of functions. PP2A function is regulated by expression, localization, holoenzyme composition and post-translational modification. Phosphorylation of PP2A at Tyr307 by Src occurs in response to EGF or insulin and results in a substantial reduction of PP2A activity (4). Reversible methylation on the carboxyl group of Leu309 of PP2A has been observed (5,6). Methylation alters the conformation of PP2A, as well as its localization and association with B regulatory subunits (6-8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) is an essential protein serine/threonine phosphatase that is conserved in all eukaryotes. PP2A is a key enzyme within various signal transduction pathways as it regulates fundamental cellular activities such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, metabolism, cell cycle progression, cell division, apoptosis and development (1-3). The core enzyme consists of catalytic C and regulatory A (or PR65) subunits, with each subunit represented by α and β isoforms (1). Additional regulatory subunits belong to four different families of unrelated proteins. Both the B (or PR55) and B' regulatory protein families contain α, β, γ and δ isoforms, with the B' family also including an ε protein. B'' family proteins include PR72, PR130, PR59 and PR48 isoforms, while striatin (PR110) and SG2NA (PR93) are both members of the B''' regulatory protein family. These B subunits competitively bind to a shared binding site on the core A subunit (1). This variable array of holoenzyme components, particularly regulatory B subunits, allows PP2A to act in a diverse set of functions. PP2A function is regulated by expression, localization, holoenzyme composition and post-translational modification. Phosphorylation of PP2A at Tyr307 by Src occurs in response to EGF or insulin and results in a substantial reduction of PP2A activity (4). Reversible methylation on the carboxyl group of Leu309 of PP2A has been observed (5,6). Methylation alters the conformation of PP2A, as well as its localization and association with B regulatory subunits (6-8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein Phosphatase 2A subunit isoform R5-δ (PPP2R5D) belongs to the R5/B'/B56 family of the regulatory subunit B of serine/threonine phosphatase 2A (1). PPP2R5D (B-δ) is structurally related to the other components of subunit B, B-α. PPP2R5D lacks the WD-40 repeats that are important for protein-protein interaction (1-2). Structural differences may contribute to distinct down stream effects (3) and directing PP2A nuclear localization (4). Current evidence suggests that in contrast to B-α, PPP2R5D modulates the TGF-β/Actividin/Nodal signaling pathways by restricting the downstream activities of the type I TGF-β receptors, ALK4, and ALK5 (3)

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) is an essential protein serine/threonine phosphatase that is conserved in all eukaryotes. PP2A is a key enzyme within various signal transduction pathways as it regulates fundamental cellular activities such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, metabolism, cell cycle progression, cell division, apoptosis and development (1-3). The core enzyme consists of catalytic C and regulatory A (or PR65) subunits, with each subunit represented by α and β isoforms (1). Additional regulatory subunits belong to four different families of unrelated proteins. Both the B (or PR55) and B' regulatory protein families contain α, β, γ and δ isoforms, with the B' family also including an ε protein. B'' family proteins include PR72, PR130, PR59 and PR48 isoforms, while striatin (PR110) and SG2NA (PR93) are both members of the B''' regulatory protein family. These B subunits competitively bind to a shared binding site on the core A subunit (1). This variable array of holoenzyme components, particularly regulatory B subunits, allows PP2A to act in a diverse set of functions. PP2A function is regulated by expression, localization, holoenzyme composition and post-translational modification. Phosphorylation of PP2A at Tyr307 by Src occurs in response to EGF or insulin and results in a substantial reduction of PP2A activity (4). Reversible methylation on the carboxyl group of Leu309 of PP2A has been observed (5,6). Methylation alters the conformation of PP2A, as well as its localization and association with B regulatory subunits (6-8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) is an essential protein serine/threonine phosphatase that is conserved in all eukaryotes. PP2A is a key enzyme within various signal transduction pathways as it regulates fundamental cellular activities such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, metabolism, cell cycle progression, cell division, apoptosis and development (1-3). The core enzyme consists of catalytic C and regulatory A (or PR65) subunits, with each subunit represented by α and β isoforms (1). Additional regulatory subunits belong to four different families of unrelated proteins. Both the B (or PR55) and B' regulatory protein families contain α, β, γ and δ isoforms, with the B' family also including an ε protein. B'' family proteins include PR72, PR130, PR59 and PR48 isoforms, while striatin (PR110) and SG2NA (PR93) are both members of the B''' regulatory protein family. These B subunits competitively bind to a shared binding site on the core A subunit (1). This variable array of holoenzyme components, particularly regulatory B subunits, allows PP2A to act in a diverse set of functions. PP2A function is regulated by expression, localization, holoenzyme composition and post-translational modification. Phosphorylation of PP2A at Tyr307 by Src occurs in response to EGF or insulin and results in a substantial reduction of PP2A activity (4). Reversible methylation on the carboxyl group of Leu309 of PP2A has been observed (5,6). Methylation alters the conformation of PP2A, as well as its localization and association with B regulatory subunits (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) is an essential protein serine/threonine phosphatase that is conserved in all eukaryotes. PP2A is a key enzyme within various signal transduction pathways as it regulates fundamental cellular activities such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, metabolism, cell cycle progression, cell division, apoptosis and development (1-3). The core enzyme consists of catalytic C and regulatory A (or PR65) subunits, with each subunit represented by α and β isoforms (1). Additional regulatory subunits belong to four different families of unrelated proteins. Both the B (or PR55) and B' regulatory protein families contain α, β, γ and δ isoforms, with the B' family also including an ε protein. B'' family proteins include PR72, PR130, PR59 and PR48 isoforms, while striatin (PR110) and SG2NA (PR93) are both members of the B''' regulatory protein family. These B subunits competitively bind to a shared binding site on the core A subunit (1). This variable array of holoenzyme components, particularly regulatory B subunits, allows PP2A to act in a diverse set of functions. PP2A function is regulated by expression, localization, holoenzyme composition and post-translational modification. Phosphorylation of PP2A at Tyr307 by Src occurs in response to EGF or insulin and results in a substantial reduction of PP2A activity (4). Reversible methylation on the carboxyl group of Leu309 of PP2A has been observed (5,6). Methylation alters the conformation of PP2A, as well as its localization and association with B regulatory subunits (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) is an essential protein serine/threonine phosphatase that is conserved in all eukaryotes. PP2A is a key enzyme within various signal transduction pathways as it regulates fundamental cellular activities such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, metabolism, cell cycle progression, cell division, apoptosis and development (1-3). Active protein phosphatase 2A is composed of both structural (A) and catalytic (C) proteins, and its activity relies on interaction with regulatory (B) subunits. An important PP2A regulatory subunit is PP2A phosphatase activator (PTPA), also known as the PP2A activator regulatory subunit 4 (PPP2R4) (4). This PTPA regulatory protein binds ATP and has isomerase (PPIase) activity, suggesting that PP2A regulation involves a change in phosphatase conformation. The addition of ATP (and Mg2+) results in a correlated increase in both PP2A activation and PTPA isomerase activity (5). While the exact mechanism is still under consideration, evidence suggests that binding of PTPA to the PP2A A-C dimer produces a conformational change in PP2A that shifts phosphatase substrate specificity from phosphoserine to phosphotyrosine substrates (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Mitotic control is important for normal growth, development, and maintenance of all eukaryotic cells. Research studies have demonstrated that inappropriate control of mitosis can lead to genomic instability and cancer (reviewed in 1,2). A regulator of mitosis, Greatwall kinase (Gwl), was first identified in Drosophila melanogaster (3). Subsequent studies showed that, based on sequence homology and function, microtubule-associated serine/threonine kinase-like (MASTL) is the human ortholog of Gwl (4). Regulation of MASTL/Gwl activation has been shown to be critical for the correct timing of mitosis. Research studies have shown that Gwl is activated by hyperphosphorylation (5). The phosphorylation of human Gwl at Thr194 and Thr207 by active cyclin B1-cdc2 leads to possible autophosphorylation at Ser875 (Ser883 in Xenopus), which stabilizes the kinase. Activated Gwl phosphorylates α-Endosulfine (ENSA) and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 19 (ARPP19) at Ser67 and Ser62, respectively. Phosphorylated ENSA and ARPP19 inhibit the activity of the B55 subunit-associated form of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-B55), allowing for complete phosphorylation of mitotic substrates by cyclin B1-cdc2 and mitotic entry. When Gwl is inactivated, PP2A-B55 reactivates, which leads to dephosphorylation of cyclin B1-cdc2 and mitotic exit (5,6, reviewed in 7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Huntington's Disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by psychiatric, cognitive, and motor dysfunction. Neuropathology of HD involves specific neuronal subpopulations: GABA-ergic neurons of the striatum and neurons within the cerebral cortex selectively degenerate (1,2). The genetic analysis of HD has been the flagship study of inherited neurological diseases from initial chromosomal localization to identification of the gene.Huntingtin is a large (340-350 kD) cytosolic protein that may be involved in a number of cellular functions such as transcription, gastrulation, neurogenesis, neurotransmission, axonal transport, neural positioning, and apoptosis (2,3). The HD gene from unaffected individuals contains between 6 and 34 CAG trinucleotide repeats, with expansion beyond this range causing the onset of disease symptoms. A strong inverse correlation exists between the age of onset in patients and the number of huntingtin gene CAG repeats encoding a stretch of polyglutamine peptides (1,2). The huntingtin protein undergoes numerous post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, ubiquitination, sumoylation, palmitoylation, and cleavage (2). Phosphorylation of Ser421 by Akt can partially counteract the toxicity that results from the expanded polyglutamine tract. Varying Akt expression in the brain correlates with regional differences in huntingtin protein phosphorylation; this pattern inversely correlates with the regions that are most affected by degeneration in diseased brain (2). A key step in the disease is the proteolytic cleavage of huntingtin protein into amino-terminal fragments that contain expanded glutamine repeats and translocate into the nucleus. Caspase mediated cleavage of huntingtin at Asp513 is associated with increased polyglutamine aggregate formation and toxicity. Phosphorylation of Ser434 by CDK5 protects against cleavage (2,3).

$293
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Huntington's Disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by psychiatric, cognitive, and motor dysfunction. Neuropathology of HD involves specific neuronal subpopulations: GABA-ergic neurons of the striatum and neurons within the cerebral cortex selectively degenerate (1,2). The genetic analysis of HD has been the flagship study of inherited neurological diseases from initial chromosomal localization to identification of the gene.Huntingtin is a large (340-350 kD) cytosolic protein that may be involved in a number of cellular functions such as transcription, gastrulation, neurogenesis, neurotransmission, axonal transport, neural positioning, and apoptosis (2,3). The HD gene from unaffected individuals contains between 6 and 34 CAG trinucleotide repeats, with expansion beyond this range causing the onset of disease symptoms. A strong inverse correlation exists between the age of onset in patients and the number of huntingtin gene CAG repeats encoding a stretch of polyglutamine peptides (1,2). The huntingtin protein undergoes numerous post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, ubiquitination, sumoylation, palmitoylation, and cleavage (2). Phosphorylation of Ser421 by Akt can partially counteract the toxicity that results from the expanded polyglutamine tract. Varying Akt expression in the brain correlates with regional differences in huntingtin protein phosphorylation; this pattern inversely correlates with the regions that are most affected by degeneration in diseased brain (2). A key step in the disease is the proteolytic cleavage of huntingtin protein into amino-terminal fragments that contain expanded glutamine repeats and translocate into the nucleus. Caspase mediated cleavage of huntingtin at Asp513 is associated with increased polyglutamine aggregate formation and toxicity. Phosphorylation of Ser434 by CDK5 protects against cleavage (2,3).