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Mouse Sodium Channel Regulator Activity

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are composed of a pore-forming α subunit and one or more regulatory β subunits (1). Four separate genes (SCN1B-SCN4B) encode the five mammalian β subunits β1, β1B, β2, β3, and β4. In general, β subunit proteins are type I transmembrane proteins, with the exception of secreted β1B protein (reviewed in 2). β subunits regulate α subunit gating and kinetics, which controls cell excitability (3,4). Sodium channel β subunits also function as Ig superfamily cell adhesion molecules that regulate cell adhesion and migration (5,6). Additional research reveals sequential processing of β subunit proteins by β-secretase (BACE1) and γ secretase, resulting in ectodomain shedding of β subunit and generation of an intracellular carboxy-terminal fragment (CTF). Generation of the CTF is thought to play a role in cell adhesion and migration (7,8). Multiple studies demonstrate a link between β subunit gene mutations and a number of disorders, including epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, multiple sclerosis, neuropsychiatric disorders, neuropathy, inflammatory pain, and cancer (9-13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are composed of a pore-forming α subunit and one or more regulatory β subunits (1). Four separate genes (SCN1B-SCN4B) encode the five mammalian β subunits β1, β1B, β2, β3, and β4. In general, β subunit proteins are type I transmembrane proteins, with the exception of secreted β1B protein (reviewed in 2). β subunits regulate α subunit gating and kinetics, which controls cell excitability (3,4). Sodium channel β subunits also function as Ig superfamily cell adhesion molecules that regulate cell adhesion and migration (5,6). Additional research reveals sequential processing of β subunit proteins by β-secretase (BACE1) and γ secretase, resulting in ectodomain shedding of β subunit and generation of an intracellular carboxy-terminal fragment (CTF). Generation of the CTF is thought to play a role in cell adhesion and migration (7,8). Multiple studies demonstrate a link between β subunit gene mutations and a number of disorders, including epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, multiple sclerosis, neuropsychiatric disorders, neuropathy, inflammatory pain, and cancer (9-13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are composed of a pore-forming α subunit and one or more regulatory β subunits (1). Four separate genes (SCN1B-SCN4B) encode the five mammalian β subunits β1, β1B, β2, β3, and β4. In general, β subunit proteins are type I transmembrane proteins, with the exception of secreted β1B protein (reviewed in 2). β subunits regulate α subunit gating and kinetics, which controls cell excitability (3,4). Sodium channel β subunits also function as Ig superfamily cell adhesion molecules that regulate cell adhesion and migration (5,6). Additional research reveals sequential processing of β subunit proteins by β-secretase (BACE1) and γ secretase, resulting in ectodomain shedding of β subunit and generation of an intracellular carboxy-terminal fragment (CTF). Generation of the CTF is thought to play a role in cell adhesion and migration (7,8). Multiple studies demonstrate a link between β subunit gene mutations and a number of disorders, including epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, multiple sclerosis, neuropsychiatric disorders, neuropathy, inflammatory pain, and cancer (9-13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are composed of a pore-forming α subunit and one or more regulatory β subunits (1). Four separate genes (SCN1B-SCN4B) encode the five mammalian β subunits β1, β1B, β2, β3, and β4. In general, β subunit proteins are type I transmembrane proteins, with the exception of secreted β1B protein (reviewed in 2). β subunits regulate α subunit gating and kinetics, which controls cell excitability (3,4). Sodium channel β subunits also function as Ig superfamily cell adhesion molecules that regulate cell adhesion and migration (5,6). Additional research reveals sequential processing of β subunit proteins by β-secretase (BACE1) and γ secretase, resulting in ectodomain shedding of β subunit and generation of an intracellular carboxy-terminal fragment (CTF). Generation of the CTF is thought to play a role in cell adhesion and migration (7,8). Multiple studies demonstrate a link between β subunit gene mutations and a number of disorders, including epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, multiple sclerosis, neuropsychiatric disorders, neuropathy, inflammatory pain, and cancer (9-13).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Neural precursor expressed, developmentally down-regulated protein 4 (NEDD4) was originally identified as a gene that is highly expressed in the early mouse embryonic central nervous system (1). Subsequently, a family of NEDD4-like proteins have been defined that includes seven members in humans (2). NEDD4 and NEDD4-like (NEDD4L) proteins contain multiple functional domains including a calcium-dependent phospholipid and membrane binding domain (C2 domain), two to four protein binding domains (WW domains), and an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase domain (HECT domain). NEDD4 and NEDD4L have been shown to downregulate both neuronal voltage-gated Na+ channels (NaVs) and epithelial Na+ channels (ENaCs) in response to increased intracellular Na+ concentrations (3,4). The WW domains of NEDD4 bind to PY motifs (amino acid sequence PPXY) found in multiple NaV and ENaC proteins; ubiquitination of these proteins is mediated by the HECT domain of NEDD4 and results in their internalization and removal from the plasma membrane. Research studies have shown that mutation of the PY motifs in ENaC proteins is associated with Liddle's syndrome, an autosomal dominant form of hypertension (5). In addition to targeting sodium channels, NEDD4L has also been shown to negatively regulate TGF-β signaling by targeting Smad2 for degradation (6). Mouse and human NEDD4 are rapidly cleaved by caspase proteins during apoptosis, although the significance of this cleavage is not clear (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Neural precursor expressed, developmentally down-regulated protein 4 (NEDD4) was originally identified as a gene that is highly expressed in the early mouse embryonic central nervous system (1). Subsequently, a family of NEDD4-like proteins have been defined that includes seven members in humans (2). NEDD4 and NEDD4-like (NEDD4L) proteins contain multiple functional domains including a calcium-dependent phospholipid and membrane binding domain (C2 domain), two to four protein binding domains (WW domains), and an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase domain (HECT domain). NEDD4 and NEDD4L have been shown to downregulate both neuronal voltage-gated Na+ channels (NaVs) and epithelial Na+ channels (ENaCs) in response to increased intracellular Na+ concentrations (3,4). The WW domains of NEDD4 bind to PY motifs (amino acid sequence PPXY) found in multiple NaV and ENaC proteins; ubiquitination of these proteins is mediated by the HECT domain of NEDD4 and results in their internalization and removal from the plasma membrane. Research studies have shown that mutation of the PY motifs in ENaC proteins is associated with Liddle's syndrome, an autosomal dominant form of hypertension (5). In addition to targeting sodium channels, NEDD4L has also been shown to negatively regulate TGF-β signaling by targeting Smad2 for degradation (6). Mouse and human NEDD4 are rapidly cleaved by caspase proteins during apoptosis, although the significance of this cleavage is not clear (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase (SGK) is a serine/threonine kinase closely related to Akt (1). SGK is rapidly induced in response to a variety of stimuli, including serum, glucocorticoid, follicle stimulating hormone, osmotic shock, and mineralocorticoids. SGK activation can be accomplished via HGF PI3K-dependent pathways and by integrin-mediated PI3K-independent pathways (2,3). Induction and activation of SGK has been implicated in activating the modulation of anti-apoptotic and cell cycle regulation (4-6). SGK also plays an important role in activating certain potassium, sodium, and chloride channels, suggesting its involvement in the regulation of processes such as cell survival, neuronal excitability, and renal sodium excretion (2). SGK is negatively regulated by ubiquitination and proteasome degradation (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase (SGK) is a serine/threonine kinase closely related to Akt (1). SGK is rapidly induced in response to a variety of stimuli, including serum, glucocorticoid, follicle stimulating hormone, osmotic shock, and mineralocorticoids. SGK activation can be accomplished via HGF PI3K-dependent pathways and by integrin-mediated PI3K-independent pathways (2,3). Induction and activation of SGK has been implicated in activating the modulation of anti-apoptotic and cell cycle regulation (4-6). SGK also plays an important role in activating certain potassium, sodium, and chloride channels, suggesting its involvement in the regulation of processes such as cell survival, neuronal excitability, and renal sodium excretion (2). SGK is negatively regulated by ubiquitination and proteasome degradation (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase (SGK) is a serine/threonine kinase closely related to Akt (1). SGK is rapidly induced in response to a variety of stimuli, including serum, glucocorticoid, follicle stimulating hormone, osmotic shock, and mineralocorticoids. SGK activation can be accomplished via HGF PI3K-dependent pathways and by integrin-mediated PI3K-independent pathways (2,3). Induction and activation of SGK has been implicated in activating the modulation of anti-apoptotic and cell cycle regulation (4-6). SGK also plays an important role in activating certain potassium, sodium, and chloride channels, suggesting its involvement in the regulation of processes such as cell survival, neuronal excitability, and renal sodium excretion (2). SGK is negatively regulated by ubiquitination and proteasome degradation (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase (SGK) is a serine/threonine kinase closely related to Akt (1). SGK is rapidly induced in response to a variety of stimuli, including serum, glucocorticoid, follicle stimulating hormone, osmotic shock, and mineralocorticoids. SGK activation can be accomplished via HGF PI3K-dependent pathways and by integrin-mediated PI3K-independent pathways (2,3). Induction and activation of SGK has been implicated in activating the modulation of anti-apoptotic and cell cycle regulation (4-6). SGK also plays an important role in activating certain potassium, sodium, and chloride channels, suggesting its involvement in the regulation of processes such as cell survival, neuronal excitability, and renal sodium excretion (2). SGK is negatively regulated by ubiquitination and proteasome degradation (7).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 14-3-3 family of proteins plays a key regulatory role in signal transduction, checkpoint control, apoptotic and nutrient-sensing pathways (1,2). 14-3-3 proteins are highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed. There are at least seven isoforms, β, γ, ε, σ, ζ, τ, and η that have been identified in mammals. The initially described α and δ isoforms are confirmed to be phosphorylated forms of β and ζ, respectively (3). Through their amino-terminal α helical region, 14-3-3 proteins form homo- or heterodimers that interact with a wide variety of proteins: transcription factors, metabolic enzymes, cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, phosphatases, and other signaling molecules (3,4). The interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with their targets is primarily through a phospho-Ser/Thr motif. However, binding to divergent phospho-Ser/Thr motifs, as well as phosphorylation independent interactions has been observed (4). 14-3-3 binding masks specific sequences of the target protein, and therefore, modulates target protein localization, phosphorylation state, stability, and molecular interactions (1-4). 14-3-3 proteins may also induce target protein conformational changes that modify target protein function (4,5). Distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns of 14-3-3 isoforms have been observed in development and in acute response to extracellular signals and drugs, suggesting that 14-3-3 isoforms may perform different functions despite their sequence similarities (4). Several studies suggest that 14-3-3 isoforms are differentially regulated in cancer and neurological syndromes (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 14-3-3 family of proteins plays a key regulatory role in signal transduction, checkpoint control, apoptotic and nutrient-sensing pathways (1,2). 14-3-3 proteins are highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed. There are at least seven isoforms, β, γ, ε, σ, ζ, τ, and η that have been identified in mammals. The initially described α and δ isoforms are confirmed to be phosphorylated forms of β and ζ, respectively (3). Through their amino-terminal α helical region, 14-3-3 proteins form homo- or heterodimers that interact with a wide variety of proteins: transcription factors, metabolic enzymes, cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, phosphatases, and other signaling molecules (3,4). The interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with their targets is primarily through a phospho-Ser/Thr motif. However, binding to divergent phospho-Ser/Thr motifs, as well as phosphorylation independent interactions has been observed (4). 14-3-3 binding masks specific sequences of the target protein, and therefore, modulates target protein localization, phosphorylation state, stability, and molecular interactions (1-4). 14-3-3 proteins may also induce target protein conformational changes that modify target protein function (4,5). Distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns of 14-3-3 isoforms have been observed in development and in acute response to extracellular signals and drugs, suggesting that 14-3-3 isoforms may perform different functions despite their sequence similarities (4). Several studies suggest that 14-3-3 isoforms are differentially regulated in cancer and neurological syndromes (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 14-3-3 family of proteins plays a key regulatory role in signal transduction, checkpoint control, apoptotic and nutrient-sensing pathways (1,2). 14-3-3 proteins are highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed. There are at least seven isoforms, β, γ, ε, σ, ζ, τ, and η that have been identified in mammals. The initially described α and δ isoforms are confirmed to be phosphorylated forms of β and ζ, respectively (3). Through their amino-terminal α helical region, 14-3-3 proteins form homo- or heterodimers that interact with a wide variety of proteins: transcription factors, metabolic enzymes, cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, phosphatases, and other signaling molecules (3,4). The interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with their targets is primarily through a phospho-Ser/Thr motif. However, binding to divergent phospho-Ser/Thr motifs, as well as phosphorylation independent interactions has been observed (4). 14-3-3 binding masks specific sequences of the target protein, and therefore, modulates target protein localization, phosphorylation state, stability, and molecular interactions (1-4). 14-3-3 proteins may also induce target protein conformational changes that modify target protein function (4,5). Distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns of 14-3-3 isoforms have been observed in development and in acute response to extracellular signals and drugs, suggesting that 14-3-3 isoforms may perform different functions despite their sequence similarities (4). Several studies suggest that 14-3-3 isoforms are differentially regulated in cancer and neurological syndromes (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The 14-3-3 family of proteins plays a key regulatory role in signal transduction, checkpoint control, apoptotic and nutrient-sensing pathways (1,2). 14-3-3 proteins are highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed. There are at least seven isoforms, β, γ, ε, σ, ζ, τ, and η that have been identified in mammals. The initially described α and δ isoforms are confirmed to be phosphorylated forms of β and ζ, respectively (3). Through their amino-terminal α helical region, 14-3-3 proteins form homo- or heterodimers that interact with a wide variety of proteins: transcription factors, metabolic enzymes, cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, phosphatases, and other signaling molecules (3,4). The interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with their targets is primarily through a phospho-Ser/Thr motif. However, binding to divergent phospho-Ser/Thr motifs, as well as phosphorylation independent interactions has been observed (4). 14-3-3 binding masks specific sequences of the target protein, and therefore, modulates target protein localization, phosphorylation state, stability, and molecular interactions (1-4). 14-3-3 proteins may also induce target protein conformational changes that modify target protein function (4,5). Distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns of 14-3-3 isoforms have been observed in development and in acute response to extracellular signals and drugs, suggesting that 14-3-3 isoforms may perform different functions despite their sequence similarities (4). Several studies suggest that 14-3-3 isoforms are differentially regulated in cancer and neurological syndromes (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) catalyzes the formation of nitric oxide (NO) and citruline from L-arginine, oxygen and cofactors. Three family members have been characterized: neuronal NOS (nNOS), which is found primarily in neuronal tissue; inducible NOS (iNOS), which is induced by interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharides in the kidney and cardiovascular system; and endothelial NOS (eNOS), which is expressed in blood vessels (1). NO is a messenger molecule with diverse functions throughout the body including the maintenance of vascular integrity, homeostasis, synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation, learning, and memory (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) catalyzes the formation of nitric oxide (NO) and citruline from L-arginine, oxygen and cofactors. Three family members have been characterized: neuronal NOS (nNOS), which is found primarily in neuronal tissue; inducible NOS (iNOS), which is induced by interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharides in the kidney and cardiovascular system; and endothelial NOS (eNOS), which is expressed in blood vessels (1). NO is a messenger molecule with diverse functions throughout the body including the maintenance of vascular integrity, homeostasis, synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation, learning, and memory (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) catalyzes the formation of nitric oxide (NO) and citruline from L-arginine, oxygen and cofactors. Three family members have been characterized: neuronal NOS (nNOS), which is found primarily in neuronal tissue; inducible NOS (iNOS), which is induced by interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharides in the kidney and cardiovascular system; and endothelial NOS (eNOS), which is expressed in blood vessels (1). NO is a messenger molecule with diverse functions throughout the body including the maintenance of vascular integrity, homeostasis, synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation, learning, and memory (2,3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Angiotensinogen (AGT) is the primary precursor of angiotensins, peptide hormones that play a central role in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) (1-3). AGT is a secreted protein synthesized primarily by the liver and secreted into circulation. Upon binding to renin, the amino terminal fragment of AGT is cleaved and released as a decapeptide hormone termed angiotensin 1 (Ang I). Ang I is subsequently processed by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) to generate angiotensin II (Ang II), which acts on AT1 and AT2 receptors in the central nervous system to increase production of anti-diuretic hormone (ADH), while promoting vasoconstriction in the peripheral circulation (4). Aberrant upregulation of Ang II has been associated with numerous clinical conditions, including hypertension, atherosclerosis, myocardial hypertrophy, and obesity (5-7). Alternative cleavage products of Ang I (e.g., Ang 1-7) can also be generated by ACE2 cleavage, some of which display biological functions that are distinct from Ang II (8). Treatments that target the RAS (e.g., ACE inhibitors) are consequently of significant importance in the treatment of hypertensive and hypertensive-related disorders(5-8).