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Phosphate Polyclonal Antibody

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: SH2-containing inositol phosphatase 1 (SHIP1) is a hematopoietic phosphatase that hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate to phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate (1). SHIP1 is a cytosolic phosphatase with an SH2 domain in its amino terminus and two NPXY Shc binding motifs in its carboxy terminus (1,2). Upon receptor cross-linking, SHIP is first recruited to the membrane junction through binding of its SH2 domain to the phospho-tyrosine in the ITIM motif (2), followed by tyrosine phosphorylation on the NPXY motif (2). The membrane relocalization and phosphorylation on the NPXY motif is essential for the regulatory function of SHIP1 (3-5). Its effect on calcium flux, cell survival, growth, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis is mediated through the PI3K and Akt pathways (3-5). Tyr1021 is located in one of the NPXY motifs in SHIP1, and its phosphorylation is important for SHIP1 function (6).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten), also referred to as MMAC (mutated in multiple advanced cancers) phosphatase, is a tumor suppressor implicated in a wide variety of human cancers (1). PTEN encodes a 403 amino acid polypeptide originally described as a dual-specificity protein phosphatase (2). The main substrates of PTEN are inositol phospholipids generated by the activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) (3). PTEN is a major negative regulator of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway (1,4,5). PTEN possesses a carboxy-terminal, noncatalytic regulatory domain with three phosphorylation sites (Ser380, Thr382, and Thr383) that regulate PTEN stability and may affect its biological activity (6,7). PTEN regulates p53 protein levels and activity (8) and is involved in G protein-coupled signaling during chemotaxis (9,10).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten), also referred to as MMAC (mutated in multiple advanced cancers) phosphatase, is a tumor suppressor implicated in a wide variety of human cancers (1). PTEN encodes a 403 amino acid polypeptide originally described as a dual-specificity protein phosphatase (2). The main substrates of PTEN are inositol phospholipids generated by the activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) (3). PTEN is a major negative regulator of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway (1,4,5). PTEN possesses a carboxy-terminal, noncatalytic regulatory domain with three phosphorylation sites (Ser380, Thr382, and Thr383) that regulate PTEN stability and may affect its biological activity (6,7). PTEN regulates p53 protein levels and activity (8) and is involved in G protein-coupled signaling during chemotaxis (9,10).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CAD is essential for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides and possesses the following enzymatic activities: glutamine amidotransferase, carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase. Thus, the enzyme converts glutamine to uridine monophosphate, a common precursor of all pyrimidine bases, and it is necessary for nucleic acid synthesis (1). In resting cells, CAD is localized mainly in the cytoplasm where it carries out pyrimidine synthesis. As proliferating cells enter S phase, MAP Kinase (Erk1/2) phosphorlyates CAD at Thr456, resulting in CAD translocation to the nucleus. As cells exit S phase, CAD is dephosphorylated at Thr456 and phosphorylated at Ser1406 by PKA, returning the pathway to basal activity (2). Various research studies have shown increased expression of CAD in several types of cancer, prompting the development of pharmacological inhibitors such as PALA. Further studies have identified CAD as a potential predictive early marker of prostate cancer relapse (3).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: SH2-containing inositol phosphatase 1 (SHIP1) is a hematopoietic phosphatase that hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate to phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate (1). SHIP1 is a cytosolic phosphatase with an SH2 domain in its amino terminus and two NPXY Shc binding motifs in its carboxy terminus (1,2). Upon receptor cross-linking, SHIP is first recruited to the membrane junction through binding of its SH2 domain to the phospho-tyrosine in the ITIM motif (2), followed by tyrosine phosphorylation on the NPXY motif (2). The membrane relocalization and phosphorylation on the NPXY motif is essential for the regulatory function of SHIP1 (3-5). Its effect on calcium flux, cell survival, growth, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis is mediated through the PI3K and Akt pathways (3-5). Tyr1021 is located in one of the NPXY motifs in SHIP1, and its phosphorylation is important for SHIP1 function (6).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, which includes Src, Lyn, Fyn, Yes, Lck, Blk, and Hck, are important in the regulation of growth and differentiation of eukaryotic cells (1). Src activity is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation at two sites, but with opposing effects. While phosphorylation at Tyr416 in the activation loop of the kinase domain upregulates enzyme activity, phosphorylation at Tyr527 in the carboxy-terminal tail by Csk renders the enzyme less active (2).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Acetylation of the histone tail causes chromatin to adopt an "open" conformation, allowing increased accessibility of transcription factors to DNA. The identification of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and their large multiprotein complexes has yielded important insights into how these enzymes regulate transcription (1,2). HAT complexes interact with sequence-specific activator proteins to target specific genes. In addition to histones, HATs can acetylate nonhistone proteins, suggesting multiple roles for these enzymes (3). In contrast, histone deacetylation promotes a "closed" chromatin conformation and typically leads to repression of gene activity (4). Mammalian histone deacetylases can be divided into three classes on the basis of their similarity to various yeast deacetylases (5). Class I proteins (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are related to the yeast Rpd3-like proteins, those in class II (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are related to yeast Hda1-like proteins, and class III proteins are related to the yeast protein Sir2. Inhibitors of HDAC activity are now being explored as potential therapeutic cancer agents (6,7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to biotin under optimal conditions. The biotinylated antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Phospho-PLCgamma2 (Tyr1217) Antibody #3871.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) plays a significant role in transmembrane signaling. In response to extracellular stimuli such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters, PLC hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to generate two secondary messengers: inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (1). At least four families of PLCs have been identified: PLCβ, PLCγ, PLCδ and PLCε. The PLCβ subfamily includes four members, PLCβ1-4. All four members of the subfamily are activated by α- or β-γ-subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins (2,3).Phosphorylation is one of the key mechanisms that regulates the activity of PLC. Phosphorylation of Ser1105 by PKA or PKC inhibits PLCβ3 activity (4,5). Ser537 of PLCβ3 is phosphorylated by CaMKII, and this phosphorylation may contribute to the basal activity of PLCβ3. PLCγ is activated by both receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (6).PLCγ forms a complex with EGF and PDGF receptors, which leads to the phosphorylation of PLCγ at Tyr771, 783 and 1248 (7). Phosphorylation by Syk at Tyr783 activates the enzymatic activity of PLCγ1 (8).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Microtubule associated proteins regulate the stability of microtubules and control processes such as cell polarity/differentiation, neurite outgrowth, cell division and organelle trafficking (1). The MARK (MAP/microtubule affinity-regulating kinases) family (MARK1-4) of serine/threonine kinases was identified based on their ability to phosphorylate microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) including tau, MAP2 and MAP4 (2-6). MARK proteins phosphorylate MAPs within their microtubule binding domains, causing dissociation of MAPs from microtubules and increased microtubule dynamics (2-4). In the case of tau, phosphorylation has been hypothesized to contribute to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles observed in Alzheimer's disease. Overexpression of MARK leads to hyperphosphorylation of MAPs, morphological changes and cell death (4). The tumor suppressor kinase LKB1 phosphorylates MARK and the closely related AMP-kinases within their T-loops, leading to increased activity (7).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Autophagy is a catabolic process for the autophagosomic-lysosomal degradation of bulk cytoplasmic contents (1,2). It is generally activated by conditions of nutrient deprivation but is also associated with a number of physiological processes including development, differentiation, neurodegeneration, infection, and cancer (3). The molecular machinery of autophagy was largely discovered in yeast and is directed by a number of autophagy-related (Atg) genes.Vacuolar trafficking and autophagy are controlled by the class III type phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Vps34, which generates phosphoinositide-3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) (4,5). Atg18 and Atg21 are two related WD-repeat proteins that bind PtdIns3P via a conserved Phe-Arg-Arg-Gly motif (6,7). It has been shown that Atg18 binds to Atg2 and that this complex is directed to vacuolar membranes by its interaction with PtdIns3P (8). Human orthologs of Atg18 and Atg21 were identified as members of the WD-repeat protein Interacting with Phosphoinositides (WIPI) family (9-11). WIPI1 (also called WIPI49) and WIPI2 have been shown to translocate from several vacuolar compartments to LC3-positive autophagosomes during autophagy; this translocation may be used as an autophagy marker (12).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: CaMKII is an important member of the calcium/calmodulin-activated protein kinase family, functioning in neural synaptic stimulation and T cell receptor signaling (1,2). CaMKII has catalytic and regulatory domains. Ca2+/calmodulin binding to the CaMKII regulatory domain relieves autoinhibition and activates the kinase (3). The activated CaMKII further autophosphorylates at Thr286 to render the kinase constitutively active (3). The threonine phosphorylation state of CaMKII can be regulated through PP1/PKA. PP1 (protein phosphatase 1) dephosphorylates phospho-CaMKII at Thr286. PKA (protein kinase A) prevents phospho-CaMKII (Thr286) dephosphorylation through an inhibitory effect on PP1 (4).

$303
200 µl
$717
600 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat, S. cerevisiae

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: p38 MAP kinase (MAPK), also called RK (1) or CSBP (2), is the mammalian orthologue of the yeast HOG kinase that participates in a signaling cascade controlling cellular responses to cytokines and stress (1-4). Four isoforms of p38 MAPK, p38α, β, γ (also known as Erk6 or SAPK3), and δ (also known as SAPK4) have been identified. Similar to the SAPK/JNK pathway, p38 MAPK is activated by a variety of cellular stresses including osmotic shock, inflammatory cytokines, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), UV light, and growth factors (1-5). MKK3, MKK6, and SEK activate p38 MAPK by phosphorylation at Thr180 and Tyr182. Activated p38 MAPK has been shown to phosphorylate and activate MAPKAP kinase 2 (3) and to phosphorylate the transcription factors ATF-2 (5), Max (6), and MEF2 (5-8). SB203580 (4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)-imidazole) is a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK. This compound inhibits the activation of MAPKAPK-2 by p38 MAPK and subsequent phosphorylation of HSP27 (9). SB203580 inhibits p38 MAPK catalytic activity by binding to the ATP-binding pocket, but does not inhibit phosphorylation of p38 MAPK by upstream kinases (10).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Rac and Cdc42 are members of the Rho-GTPase family. In mammals, Rac exists as three isoforms, Rac1, Rac2 and Rac3, which are highly similar in sequence. Rac1 and Cdc42, the most widely studied of this group, are ubiquitously expressed. Rac2 is expressed in cells of hematopoietic origin, and Rac3, while highly expressed in brain, is also found in many other tissues. Rac and Cdc42 play key signaling roles in cytoskeletal reorganization, membrane trafficking, transcriptional regulation, cell growth and development (1). GTP binding stimulates the activity of Rac/Cdc42, and the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP through the protein's intrinsic GTPase activity, rendering it inactive. GTP hydrolysis is aided by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), while exchange of GDP for GTP is facilitated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Another level of regulation is achieved through the binding of RhoGDI, a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor, which retains Rho family GTPases, including Rac and Cdc42, in their inactive GDP-bound state (2,3).