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Pig Calcium-Dependent Protein Binding

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Annexin A2 (ANXA2), also known as lipocortin II or calpactin-1 heavy chain, is a 36 kDa member of the annexin superfamily that binds phospholipids and other proteins in a calcium-dependent manner via annexin repeats (1). Annexin A2 contains four such repeats through which it mediates protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions (1-4). It forms a constitutive heterotetramer with S100A10, acting as a bridge between the actin cytoskeleton, plasma membrane, and endocytotic vesicle machinery (5-7). Originally identified as a protein inhibitor of phospholipase A2, annexin A2 has subsequently been shown to interact with an array of protein and non-protein partners, including F-actin, spectrin, SNARE complexes, RNA, and virus particles (4,6,8,9). Annexin A2 has also been shown to have receptor-like activity and is detected on the surface of macrophages and vascular endothelial cells where it mediates macrophage activation and Factor Xa signaling, respectively (10-13). Upregulation of annexin A2 at the cell surface is thought to be modulated by phosphorylation at Tyr23 by Src (14-18). Interestingly, phosphorylation at Tyr23 has recently been shown to be required for cell surface expression of annexin A2 where it mediates motility, invasiveness, and overall metastatic potential of certain pancreatic cancer cells (19,20). Annexin A2 has also been shown to be heavily phosphorylated on serine residues in response to PKC activation via a pleiotropic mechanism (21-23). For a complete list of curated phosphorylation sites on annexin A2, please see PhosphoSitePlus® at www.phosphosite.org.

$305
50 tests
100 µl
This Cell Signaling Technology antibody is conjugated to phycoerythrin (PE) and tested in-house for direct flow cytometry analysis in human cells. This antibody is expected to exhibit the same species cross-reactivity as the unconjugated Annexin A2 (D11G2) Rabbit mAb #8235.
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry

Background: Annexin A2 (ANXA2), also known as lipocortin II or calpactin-1 heavy chain, is a 36 kDa member of the annexin superfamily that binds phospholipids and other proteins in a calcium-dependent manner via annexin repeats (1). Annexin A2 contains four such repeats through which it mediates protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions (1-4). It forms a constitutive heterotetramer with S100A10, acting as a bridge between the actin cytoskeleton, plasma membrane, and endocytotic vesicle machinery (5-7). Originally identified as a protein inhibitor of phospholipase A2, annexin A2 has subsequently been shown to interact with an array of protein and non-protein partners, including F-actin, spectrin, SNARE complexes, RNA, and virus particles (4,6,8,9). Annexin A2 has also been shown to have receptor-like activity and is detected on the surface of macrophages and vascular endothelial cells where it mediates macrophage activation and Factor Xa signaling, respectively (10-13). Upregulation of annexin A2 at the cell surface is thought to be modulated by phosphorylation at Tyr23 by Src (14-18). Interestingly, phosphorylation at Tyr23 has recently been shown to be required for cell surface expression of annexin A2 where it mediates motility, invasiveness, and overall metastatic potential of certain pancreatic cancer cells (19,20). Annexin A2 has also been shown to be heavily phosphorylated on serine residues in response to PKC activation via a pleiotropic mechanism (21-23). For a complete list of curated phosphorylation sites on annexin A2, please see PhosphoSitePlus® at www.phosphosite.org.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: MAPKAPK-3 has a single potential SH3-binding site in the proline-rich amino terminus, a putative ATP-binding site, 2 MAP kinase phosphorylation site motifs, and a putative nuclear localization signal. It shares 72% nucleotide and 75% amino acid identity with MAPKAPK-2 (1). MAPKAPK-3 has been shown to be activated by growth inducers and stress stimulation of cells. In vitro studies have demonstrated that Erk, p38 MAP kinase, and Jun amino-terminal kinase are able to phosphorylate and activate MAPKAPK-3, which suggested a role for this kinase as an integrative element of signaling in both mitogen and stress responses (2). MAPKAPK-3 was reported to interact with, phosphorylate, and repress the activity of E47, which is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor involved in the regulation of tissue-specific gene expression and cell differentiation (3). MAPKAPK-3 may also support luteal maturation through the phosphorylation and activation of the nuclear transcription factor CREB (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: In response to cytokines, stress, and chemotactic factors, MAP kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAPK-2) is rapidly phosphorylated and activated. It has been shown that MAPKAPK-2 is a direct target of p38 MAPK (1). Multiple residues of MAPKAPK-2 are phosphorylated in vivo in response to stress. However, only four residues (Thr25, Thr222, Ser272, and Thr334) are phosphorylated by p38 MAPK in an in vitro kinase assay (2). Phosphorylation at Thr222, Ser272, and Thr334 appears to be essential for the activity of MAPKAPK-2 (2). Thr25 is phosphorylated by p42 MAPK in vitro, but is not required for the activation of MAPKAPK-2 (2).