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Polyclonal Antibody Cell Cycle

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The Drosophila piwi gene was identified as being required for the self-renewal of germline stem cells (1). Piwi homologs are well conserved among various species including Arabidopsis, C. elegans, and Homo sapiens (1). Both Miwi and Mili proteins are mouse homologs of Piwi and contain a C-terminal Piwi domain (2). Miwi and Mili bind to Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) in male germ cells and are essential for spermatogenesis in mice (3-5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: High temperature requirement protein A2 (HtrA2)/Omi is a serine protease with homology to the E. coli HtrA protein (DegP) and is thought to be involved in apoptosis and stress-induced degradation of misfolded proteins (1). While HtrA2 was orignally identified to be present in either the nucleus (1) or endoplasmic reticulum (2), subsequent studies have shown that it localizes in mitochondria and is released during apoptosis (3-8). HtrA2 is produced as a 50 kDa zymogen that is cleaved to generate a 36 kDa mature protein that exposes an amino terminal motif (AVPS) resembling that of the IAP inhibitor Smac/Diablo (3-8). Like Smac, interaction between HtrA2 and IAP family members, such as XIAP, antagonizes their inhibition of caspase activity and protection from apoptosis (3-8). Interestingly, HtrA2 knock-out mice did not show signs of reduced apoptosis, but rather had a loss of neurons in the striatum and a Parkinson's-like phenotype, suggesting that HtrA2 might have a neuroprotective function (9-11). This activity is associated with the protease activity of HtrA2 (9). Furthermore, research studies have shown that loss of function mutations in the HtrA2 gene are associated with Parkinson's disease (12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: TDP43 (TAR DNA-binding protein 43) is involved in transcriptional regulation and exon splicing (1,2). While normal TDP43 is a nuclear protein, pathological TDP43 is a component of insoluble aggregates in patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In these disorders, TDP43 is abnormally ubiquitinated, phosphorylated and cleaved to generate carboxy-terminal fragments that are sequestered as insoluble aggregates in neuronal nuclei, perikarya, and neurites (3,4). Additionally, TDP43 inhibits the expression of the HIV-1 gene and regulates CFTR gene splicing (1,5).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: The mTORC1 kinase complex is a critical regulator of cell growth (1,2). Its activity is modulated by energy levels, growth factors, and amino acids via signaling through Akt, MAPK, and AMPK pathways (3,4). Recent studies found that the four related GTPases, RagA, RagB, RagC, and RagD, interact with raptor within the mTORC1 complex (1,2). These interactions are both necessary and sufficient for mTORC1 activation in response to amino acid signals (1,2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Eukaryotic release factor 3 (eRF3, GSPT) is an evolutionarily conserved class II release factor and member of the GTPase superfamily that cooperates with eRF1 in polypeptide translation termination (1). Paralogous genes encode a pair of eRF3 proteins (eRF3a/GSPT1, eRF3b/GSPT2) that share a conserved carboxy-terminal GTPase/eRF1-binding domain and a non-conserved amino-terminal PABP1 binding site (2). The eRF3 carboxy-terminal region is involved in translation termination through binding and activation of the eRF1 release factor (1). The amino-terminal region of eRF3 is not required for eRF1 binding and activation, but is implicated in control of mRNA stability (3,4). Expression of eRF3 proteins vary, with eRF3a ubiquitously expressed and proliferation-dependent, while eRF3b expression is more restricted to brain tissue (2,5,6). Research studies demonstrate that eRF3 undergoes caspase-mediated cleavage and degradation related to reduced protein synthesis during DNA damage-induced apoptosis (7). Additional studies indicate that polyglycine expansion of the eRF3a amino terminus is associated with an increased susceptibility to breast and gastric cancer (8,9). It is likely that the polyglycine expansions of amino-terminal eRF3a may affect the ability of eRF3a to undergo caspase-mediated cleavage (9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methyltransferase-like protein 3 (METTL3) and methytransferase-like protein 14 (METTL14) are the two catalytic subunits of an N6-methyltransferase complex that methylates adenosine residues in RNA (1). Methylation of adenosine residues regulates mRNA splicing, processing, translation efficiency, editing and stability, in addition to regulating primary miRNA processing, and is critical for proper regulation of the circadian clock, embryonic stem cell self-renewal, immune tolerance, response to various stimuli, meiosis and mouse fertility (2,3). In this complex, METTL3 functions as the catalytic methyltransferase subunit and METTL14 functions as the target recognition subunit by binding to RNA (4). In addition, the Wilms tumor 1-associated protein (WTAP) functions as a regulatory subunit and is required for accumulation of the complex to nuclear speckles, which are sites of RNA processing (5). Several studies suggest a role for this complex in cancer. METTL3 expression is elevated in lung adenocarcinoma where it promotes growth, survival and invasion of human lung cancer cells (6). In addition, WTAP is over-expressed in a number of different cancers and positively regulates cell migration and invasion in glioblastoma and cholangiocarcinoma (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Drosophila piwi gene was identified as being required for the self-renewal of germline stem cells (1). Piwi homologs are well conserved among various species including Arabidopsis, C. elegans, and Homo sapiens (1). Both Miwi and Mili proteins are mouse homologs of Piwi and contain a C-terminal Piwi domain (2). Miwi and Mili bind to Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) in male germ cells and are essential for spermatogenesis in mice (3-5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Methylation of DNA at cytosine residues in mammalian cells is a heritable, epigenetic modification that is critical for proper regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting and development (1,2). Three families of mammalian DNA methyltransferases have been identified: DNMT1, DNMT2 and DNMT3 (1,2). DNMT1 is constitutively expressed in proliferating cells and functions as a maintenance methyltransferase, transferring proper methylation patterns to newly synthesized DNA during replication. DNMT3A and DNMT3B are strongly expressed in embryonic stem cells with reduced expression in adult somatic tissues. DNMT3A and DNMT3B function as de novo methyltransferases that methylate previously unmethylated regions of DNA. DNMT2 is expressed at low levels in adult somatic tissues and its inactivation affects neither de novo nor maintenance DNA methylation. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B together form a protein complex that interacts with histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, Sin3A), transcriptional repressor proteins (RB, TAZ-1) and heterochromatin proteins (HP1, SUV39H1), to maintain proper levels of DNA methylation and facilitate gene silencing (3-8). Improper DNA methylation contributes to diseased states such as cancer (1,2). Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands within tumor suppressor genes correlates with gene silencing and the development of cancer. In addition, hypomethylation of bulk genomic DNA correlates with and may contribute to the onset of cancer. DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B are over-expressed in many cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias, in addition to colon, breast and stomach carcinomas (9-12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Nucleoporin 98 kDa (NUP98) is a component of the nuclear pore complex. It is expressed as three different precursors that undergo auto-cleavage to generate a common amino-terminal 98 kDa peptide (NUP98) and carboxy-terminal 6, 96 (NUP96) and 88 (p88) kDa peptides (1,2). NUP98 contains FG and GLFG repeat domains at its amino terminus and a RNA-binding domain in its carboxy terminus (3). The NUP98 gene is localized on chromosome 11p15.5, a region frequently rearranged in leukemias. To date, 15 fusion partners have been identified for NUP98 (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Nucleoporin 98 kDa (NUP98) is a component of the nuclear pore complex. It is expressed as three different precursors that undergo auto-cleavage to generate a common amino-terminal 98 kDa peptide (NUP98) and carboxy-terminal 6, 96 (NUP96) and 88 (p88) kDa peptides (1,2). NUP98 contains FG and GLFG repeat domains at its amino terminus and a RNA-binding domain in its carboxy terminus (3). The NUP98 gene is localized on chromosome 11p15.5, a region frequently rearranged in leukemias. To date, 15 fusion partners have been identified for NUP98 (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Emerin is a broadly expressed integral protein of the nuclear inner membrane (1). It contains a LEM domain and binds to several nuclear proteins, such as BAF (barrier-to-autointegration factor) and A- and B-type lamins, which are important in nuclear functions (2-5). Emerin may regulate gene expression through binding to other transcriptional regulators (6,7). Emerin binds to β-catenin and inhibits its nuclear accumulation (8). Recent studies demonstrate that emerin is required for HIV-1 infectivity (9). Mutations in the gene encoding emerin (EMD) are a major cause of Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD), a disorder characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakening (10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TDP43 (TAR DNA-binding protein 43) is involved in transcriptional regulation and exon splicing (1,2). While normal TDP43 is a nuclear protein, pathological TDP43 is a component of insoluble aggregates in patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In these disorders, TDP43 is abnormally ubiquitinated, phosphorylated and cleaved to generate carboxy-terminal fragments that are sequestered as insoluble aggregates in neuronal nuclei, perikarya, and neurites (3,4). Additionally, TDP43 inhibits the expression of the HIV-1 gene and regulates CFTR gene splicing (1,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Pin1, a member of the parvulin family of peptidyl-prolyl isomerases (PPIase), has been implicated in the G2/M transition of the mammalian cell cycle (1-6). Pin1 is a small (18 kDa) protein with two distinct functional domains: an amino-terminal WW domain and a carboxy-terminal PPlase domain. Pin1 interacts with several mitotic phosphoproteins, including Plk1, cdc25C and cdc27, and is thought to act as a phosphorylation-dependent PPlase for these target molecules (7-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Transformation/transcription domain-associated protein (TRRAP) is a highly conserved 434 kDa protein found in various multiprotein complexes, such as SAGA, PCAF, NuA4 and TIP60, which contain histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity (1-4). TRRAP functions as an adaptor protein by binding directly to the transactivation domains of transcriptional activator proteins and facilitating the recruitment of HAT complexes to acetylate histone proteins and activate transcription (1-5). TRRAP is required for the transcriptional activation and cell transformation activities of c-Myc, E2F1, E2F4, p53 and the adenovirus E1A proteins (1,6,7). TRRAP is also essential in early development and is required at the mitotic checkpoint and for normal cell cycle progression (8,9). In addition, TRRAP has been shown to function in DNA repair. As part of the TIP60 complex, TRRAP is required for the acetylation of histone H4 at double-stranded DNA breaks and subsequent DNA repair by homologous recombination (10). In addition, TRRAP associates with the MRN (MRE11, RAD50, NBS1) complex, which lacks intrinsic HAT activity yet functions in the sensing and subsequent repair of double-stranded breaks by non-homologous DNA end-joining (11). TRRAP shows significant homology to the PI-3 kinase domain of the ATM family of kinases; however, amino acids that map to the catalytic site of the kinase domain are not conserved in TRRAP (1).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitin can be covalently linked to many cellular proteins by the ubiquitination process, which targets proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome. Three components are involved in the target protein-ubiquitin conjugation process. Ubiquitin is first activated by forming a thiolester complex with the activation component E1; the activated ubiquitin is subsequently transferred to the ubiquitin-carrier protein E2, and then from E2 to ubiquitin ligase E3 for final delivery to the epsilon-NH2 of the target protein lysine residue (1-3). Combinatorial interactions of different E2 and E3 proteins result in substrate specificity (4). Recent data suggest that activated E2 associates transiently with E3, and that the dissociation is a critical step for ubiqitination (5). UBC3, the mammalian orthologue of yeast Cdc34, and UBC3B, a UBC3 family member, are E2 ubiquitin-carrier proteins. These proteins contain a conserved core domain containing a cysteine residue, which forms the thioester bond with ubiquitin (6). UBC3 in concert with the SCFSkp2 (Skp1, Cullin and F-box protein/Skp2) complex mediates cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase by targeting the CDK inhibitor p27 for proteolysis (7). UBC3B in concert with the SCFb-Trcp (Skp1, Cullin and F-box protein/b-Trcp) complex mediates degradation of b-catenin (6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Lipin 1 was identified as a nuclear protein required for adipose tissue development (1). The expression of Lipin 1 is induced during adipocyte differentiation (1). The abnormal development of adipose tissues caused by mutations in the lipin 1 gene results in lipodystrophy, a condition associated with low body fat, fatty liver, hypertriglyceridemia, and insulin resistance (1). Lipin 1 plays a role in lipid metabolism in various tissues and cell types including liver, muscle, adipose tissues, and neuronal cell lines (2-4). It has dual functions at the molecular level: Lipin 1 serves as a transcriptional coactivator in liver, and a phosphatidate phosphatase in triglyceride and phospholipid biosynthesis pathways (5). Lipin 1 is regulated by mTOR, illustrating a connection between adipocyte development and nutrient-sensing pathways (6). It also mediates hepatic insulin signaling by TORC2/CRTC2 (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: DRB-sensitivity inducing factor (DSIF), a heterodimer composed of SPT4 and SPT5, is capable of both facilitating and inhibiting RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) activity (1-3). DSIF, together with NELF (Negative Elongation Factor), inhibits RNAPII elongation, resulting in promoter proximal pausing of RNAPII as it awaits additional signaling to resume transcription (4). The release of promoter proximal pausing is signaled through phosphorylation of the RNAPII C-terminal domain (CTD) and NELF by positive transcription elongation factor (P-TEFb) (5). P-TEFb also phosphorylates SPT5 at Thr4 within the evolutionarily conserved heptapeptide repeat motif. This phosphorylation event switches DSIF from a transcriptional repressor to an activator where it becomes a critical factor for transcriptional elongation (6,7).

$260
100 µl
$630
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Translation repressor protein 4E-BP1 (also known as PHAS-1) inhibits cap-dependent translation by binding to the translation initiation factor eIF4E. Hyperphosphorylation of 4E-BP1 disrupts this interaction and results in activation of cap-dependent translation (1). Both the PI3 kinase/Akt pathway and FRAP/mTOR kinase regulate 4E-BP1 activity (2,3). Multiple 4E-BP1 residues are phosphorylated in vivo (4). While phosphorylation by FRAP/mTOR at Thr37 and Thr46 does not prevent the binding of 4E-BP1 to eIF4E, it is thought to prime 4E-BP1 for subsequent phosphorylation at Ser65 and Thr70 (5).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Translation repressor protein 4E-BP1 (also known as PHAS-1) inhibits cap-dependent translation by binding to the translation initiation factor eIF4E. Hyperphosphorylation of 4E-BP1 disrupts this interaction and results in activation of cap-dependent translation (1). Both the PI3 kinase/Akt pathway and FRAP/mTOR kinase regulate 4E-BP1 activity (2,3). Multiple 4E-BP1 residues are phosphorylated in vivo (4). While phosphorylation by FRAP/mTOR at Thr37 and Thr46 does not prevent the binding of 4E-BP1 to eIF4E, it is thought to prime 4E-BP1 for subsequent phosphorylation at Ser65 and Thr70 (5).

$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Translation repressor protein 4E-BP1 (also known as PHAS-1) inhibits cap-dependent translation by binding to the translation initiation factor eIF4E. Hyperphosphorylation of 4E-BP1 disrupts this interaction and results in activation of cap-dependent translation (1). Both the PI3 kinase/Akt pathway and FRAP/mTOR kinase regulate 4E-BP1 activity (2,3). Multiple 4E-BP1 residues are phosphorylated in vivo (4). While phosphorylation by FRAP/mTOR at Thr37 and Thr46 does not prevent the binding of 4E-BP1 to eIF4E, it is thought to prime 4E-BP1 for subsequent phosphorylation at Ser65 and Thr70 (5).