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Polyclonal Antibody Cell Redox Homeostasis

Also showing Polyclonal Antibody Western Blotting Cell Redox Homeostasis

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Ape1 (Apurinic/Apyrimidic eEndonuclease 1), also known as Ref1 (Redox effector factor 1), is a multifunctional protein with several biological activities. These include roles in DNA repair and in the cellular response to oxidative stress. Ape1 initiates the repair of abasic sites and is essential for the base excision repair (BER) pathway (1). Repair activities of Ape1 are stimulated by interaction with XRCC1 (2), another essential protein in BER. Ape1 functions as a redox factor that maintains transcription factors in an active, reduced state but can also function in a redox-independent manner as a transcriptional cofactor to control different cellular fates such as apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation (3). Increased expression of Ape1 is associated with many types of cancers including cervical, ovarian, prostate, rhabdomyosarcomas and germ cell tumors (4). Ape1 has been shown to stimulate DNA binding of several transcription factors known to be involved in tumor progression such as Fos, Jun, NF-κB, PAX, HIF-1, HLF and p53 (4). Mutation of the Ape1 gene has also been associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Secretory proteins translocate into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during synthesis where they are post-translationally modified and properly folded. To reach their native conformation, many secretory proteins require the formation of intra- or inter-molecular disulfide bonds (1). This process is called oxidative protein folding. Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) has two thioredoxin homology domains and catalyzes the formation and isomerization of these disulfide bonds (2). Other ER resident proteins that possess thioredoxin homology domains, including ER stress protein 72 (ERp72), constitute the PDI family (3,4). ERp72 contains three thioredoxin homology domains (3) and plays a role in the formation and isomerization of disulfide bonds (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: TRXR1 (thioredoxin reductase 1) is a selenocysteine-containing protein that is involved in redox homeostasis (1-6). Its canonical target is thioredoxin, another redox protein (1). Together, they are involved in many functions such as antioxidant regulation (3-6), cell proliferation (2,3,5), DNA replication (2,3), and transcription (3,5). TRXR1 is also capable of reducing a wide array of cellular proteins (1,3). Selenium deficiency, either by diet modification (2,6) or introduction of methylmercury (4), hinders proper expression and function of TRXR1. It is possible that this effect, which results in a higher oxidative state, is a result of the selenocysteine codon (UGA) being read as a STOP codon in the absence of adequate selenium (4). The functions of TRXR1 in cell proliferation and antioxidant defense make it a potential therapeutic target.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Secretory proteins translocate into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) after their synthesis where they are post-translationally modified and properly folded. To reach their native conformation, many secretory proteins require the formation of intra- or inter-molecular disulfide bonds (1). This process is called oxidative protein folding. Disulfide isomerase (PDI) has two thioredoxin homology domains and catalyzes the formation and isomerization of these disulfide bonds (2). Other ER resident proteins that possess the thioredoxin homology domains, including endoplasmic reticulum stress protein 57 (ERp57), constitute the PDI family (2). ERp57 interacts with calnexin and calreticulin (3) and is suggested to play a role in the isomerization of disulfide bonds on certain glycoproteins (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Secretory proteins translocate into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) after their synthesis where they are post-translationally modified and properly folded. To reach their native conformation, many secretory proteins require the formation of intra- or inter-molecular disulfide bonds (1). This process is called oxidative protein folding. Disulfide isomerase (PDI) has two thioredoxin homology domains and catalyzes the formation and isomerization of these disulfide bonds (2). Other ER resident proteins that possess the thioredoxin homology domains, including endoplasmic reticulum stress protein 57 (ERp57), constitute the PDI family (2). ERp57 interacts with calnexin and calreticulin (3) and is suggested to play a role in the isomerization of disulfide bonds on certain glycoproteins (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF, PDCD8) is a ubiquitously expressed flavoprotein that plays a critical role in caspase-independent apoptosis (reviewed in 1,2). AIF is normally localized to the mitochondrial intermembrane space and released in response to apoptotic stimuli (3). Treatment of isolated nuclei with recombinant AIF leads to early apoptotic events, such as chromatin condensation and large-scale DNA fragmentation (3). Studies of AIF knockout mice have shown that the apoptotic activity of AIF is cell type and stimuli-dependent. Also noted was that AIF was required for embryoid body cavitation, representing the first wave of programmed cell death during embryonic morphogenesis (4). Structural analysis of AIF revealed two important regions, the first having oxidoreductase activity and the second being a potential DNA binding domain (3,5). While AIF is redox-active and can behave as an NADH oxidase, this activity is not required for inducing apoptosis (6). Instead, recent studies suggest that AIF has dual functions, a pro-apoptotic activity in the nucleus via its DNA binding and an anti-apoptotic activity via the scavenging of free radicals through its oxidoreductase activity (2,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Thioredoxin is a small redox protein found in many eukaryotes and prokaryotes. A pair of cysteines within a highly conserved, active site sequence can be oxidized to form a disulfide bond that is then reduced by thioredoxin reductase (1). Multiple forms of thioredoxin have been identified, including cytosolic thioredoxin 1 (TRX1) and mitochondrial thioredoxin 2 (TRX2). Thioredoxin participates in many cellular processes including redox signaling, response to oxidative stress, and protein reduction (1). A potential role of thioredoxin in human disorders such as cancer, aging, and heart disease is currently under investigation (2). Thioredoxin can play a key role in cancer progression, because it acts as a negative regulator of the proapoptotic kinase ASK1 (3). Changes in thioredoxin expression have been associated with meningococcal septic shock and acute lung injury (4,5).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Secretory proteins translocate into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) after their synthesis where they are post-translationally modified and properly folded. To reach their native conformation, many secretory proteins require the formation of intra- or inter-molecular disulfide bonds (1). This process is called oxidative protein folding. Disulfide isomerase (PDI) has two thioredoxin homology domains and catalyzes the formation and isomerization of these disulfide bonds (2). Other ER resident proteins that possess the thioredoxin homology domains, including endoplasmic reticulum resident protein 44 (ERp44), constitute the PDI family (2). ERp44 is induced upon ER stress and is linked to Ero1-Lα and Ero1-Lβ through mixed disulfide bonds (3). ERp44 was shown to mediate the ER localization of Ero1-Lα (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) is a cytosolic selenoprotein which reduces hydrogen peroxide to water (1). GPX1 is the most abundant and ubiquitous among the five GPX isoforms identified so far (2). It is an important component in the anti-oxidative defense in cells and is associated with a variety of disease conditions, such as colon cancer (3), coronary artery disease (4) and insulin resistance (1).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Secretory proteins translocate into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) after their synthesis where they are post-translationally modified and properly folded. To reach their native conformation, many secretory proteins require the formation of intra- or inter-molecular disulfide bonds (1). This process is called oxidative protein folding. Several oxidoreductases of the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family essential for disulfide formation and isomerization are localized to the ER (2). Studies have found that the ER-residing protein endoplasmic oxidoreductin-1 (Ero1) provides the oxidizing potential to the ER in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (3). In vitro experiments demonstrated that Ero1 is oxidized by molecular oxygen in a FAD-dependent manner and the oxidized Ero1 in turn serves as an oxidant for PDI (4). Two human homologs of Ero1, Ero1-like (Ero1-Lα and β) have been identified (2,5). Ero1-Lα is an ER membrane-associated N-glycoprotein that promotes oxidative protein folding and has been shown to be expressed in several cell lines and tissues (2).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: During their synthesis, secretory proteins translocate into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where they are post-translationally modified and properly folded. To reach their native conformation, many secretory proteins require the formation of intra- or inter-molecular disulfide bonds (1). This process is called oxidative protein folding. Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) catalyzes the formation and isomerization of these disulfide bonds (2). Studies on mechanisms of oxidative folding suggest that molecular oxygen oxidizes the ER-protein Ero1, which in turn oxidizes PDI through disulfide exchange (3). This event is then followed by PDI-catalyzed disulfide bond formation in folding proteins (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Thioredoxin is a small redox protein found in many eukaryotes and prokaryotes. A pair of cysteines within a highly conserved, active site sequence can be oxidized to form a disulfide bond that is then reduced by thioredoxin reductase (1). Multiple forms of thioredoxin have been identified, including cytosolic thioredoxin 1 (TRX1) and mitochondrial thioredoxin 2 (TRX2). Thioredoxin participates in many cellular processes including redox signaling, response to oxidative stress, and protein reduction (1). A potential role of thioredoxin in human disorders such as cancer, aging, and heart disease is currently under investigation (2). Thioredoxin can play a key role in cancer progression, because it acts as a negative regulator of the proapoptotic kinase ASK1 (3). Changes in thioredoxin expression have been associated with meningococcal septic shock and acute lung injury (4,5).