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Polyclonal Antibody Flow Cytometry Protein Oligomerization

Also showing Polyclonal Antibody Flow Cytometry Regulation of Protein Oligomerization

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) is a member of the dynamin superfamily of GTPases. Members of this family have diverse cellular functions including vesicle scission, organelle fission, viral resistance, and intracellular trafficking (reviewed in 1). DRP1 affects mitochondrial morphology and is important in mitochondrial and peroxisomal fission in mammalian cells (2-5). The yeast ortholog of DRP1 clusters into a spiral-shaped structure on the mitochondrial membrane at the site of fission (reviewed in 6), and this structure is likely conserved in mammalian cells (3). The division of the mitochondria, which is required for apoptosis, as well as normal cell growth and development is controlled, in part, by the phosphorylation of DRP1 at Ser616 by Cdk1/cyclin B and at Ser637 by protein kinase A (PKA) (reviewed in 6). When phosphorylated at Ser616, DRP1 stimulates mitochondrial fission during mitosis. Conversely, fission is inhibited when DRP1 is phosphorylated at Ser637 (reviewed in 6). Dephosphorylation at Ser637 by calcineurin reverses this inhibition (7). In addition to phosphorylation, sumoylation of DRP1 is also an enhancer of mitochondrial fission (8). Balancing fission and fusion events is essential for proper mitochondrial function. Research studies have demonstrated mitochondrial defects in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease (reviewed in 6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Nucleophosmin (NPM; also known as B23, numatrin or NO38) is an abundant phosphoprotein primarily found in nucleoli. It has been implicated in several distinct cellular functions, including assembly and transport of ribosomes, cytoplasmic/nuclear trafficking, regulation of DNA polymerase α activity, centrosome duplication and molecular chaperoning activities (1,2). The NPM gene is also known for its fusion with the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) receptor tyrosine kinase. The NPM portion contributes to transformation by providing a dimerization domain, which results in activation of the fused kinase (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Frozen), Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin)

Background: The maintenance of glucose homeostasis is an essential physiological process that is regulated by hormones. An elevation in blood glucose levels during feeding stimulates insulin release from pancreatic β cells through a glucose sensing pathway (1). Insulin is synthesized as a precursor molecule, proinsulin, which is processed prior to secretion. A- and B-peptides are joined together by a disulfide bond to form insulin, while the central portion of the precursor molecule is cleaved and released as the C-peptide. Insulin stimulates glucose uptake from blood into skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Insulin deficiency leads to type 1 diabetes mellitus (2).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).