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Polyclonal Antibody Hair Cycle Process

Also showing Polyclonal Antibody Western Blotting Hair Cycle Process

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cadherins are a superfamily of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain cadherin repeats of approximately 100 residues in their extracellular domain. Cadherins mediate calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion and play critical roles in normal tissue development (1). The classic cadherin subfamily includes N-, P-, R-, B-, and E-cadherins, as well as about ten other members that are found in adherens junctions, a cellular structure near the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells. The cytoplasmic domain of classical cadherins interacts with β-catenin, γ-catenin (also called plakoglobin), and p120 catenin. β-catenin and γ-catenin associate with α-catenin, which links the cadherin-catenin complex to the actin cytoskeleton (1,2). While β- and γ-catenin play structural roles in the junctional complex, p120 regulates cadherin adhesive activity and trafficking (1-4). Investigators consider E-cadherin an active suppressor of invasion and growth of many epithelial cancers (1-3). Research studies indicate that cancer cells have upregulated N-cadherin in addition to loss of E-cadherin. This change in cadherin expression is called the "cadherin switch." N-cadherin cooperates with the FGF receptor, leading to overexpression of MMP-9 and cellular invasion (3). Research studies have shown that in endothelial cells, VE-cadherin signaling, expression, and localization correlate with vascular permeability and tumor angiogenesis (5,6). Investigators have also demonstrated that expression of P-cadherin, which is normally present in epithelial cells, is also altered in ovarian and other human cancers (7,8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Cyclooxygenase1 (Cox1) and cyclooxygenase2 (Cox2), family members with 60% homology in humans, catalyze prostaglandin production from arachidonic acid (1,2). While Cox1 expression is constitutive in most tissues, Cox2 expression is induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and peptidoglycan (PGN) (3). PGN activates Ras, leading to phosphorylation of Raf at Ser338 and Erk1/2 at Tyr204. The activation of MAP kinase signaling results in subsequent activation of IKKα/β, phosphorylation of IκBα at Ser32/36, and NF-κB activation. Finally, activation of the transcription factor NF-κB is responsible for the induction of Cox2 expression (4). Investigators have shown that LPS and PGN induce the clinical manifestations of arthritis and bacterial infections, such as inflammation, fever, and septic shock (5). Research studies have indicated that Cox1 and Cox2 may also play a role in the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease by potentiating γ-secretase activity and β-amyloid generation (6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Circadian rhythms govern many key physiological processes that fluctuate with a period of approximately 24 hours. These processes include the sleep-wake cycle, glucose, lipid and drug metabolism, heart rate, hormone secretion, renal blood flow, and body temperature, as well as basic cellular processes such as DNA repair and the timing of the cell division cycle (1,2). The mammalian circadian system consists of many individual tissue-specific clocks (peripheral clocks) that are controlled by a master circadian pacemaker residing in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the brain (1,2). The periodic circadian rhythm is prominently manifested by the light-dark cycle, which is sensed by the visual system and processed by the SCN. The SCN processes the light-dark information and synchronizes peripheral clocks through neural and humoral output signals (1,2).The cellular circadian clockwork consists of interwoven positive and negative regulatory loops, or limbs (1,2). The positive limb includes the CLOCK and BMAL1 proteins, two basic helix-loop-helix-PAS containing transcription factors that bind E box enhancer elements and activate transcription of their target genes. CLOCK is a histone acetyltransferase (HAT) protein, which acetylates both histone H3 and H4 (3). BMAL1 binds to CLOCK and enhances its HAT activity (3). The CLOCK/BMAL1 dimer exhibits a periodic oscillation in both nuclear/cytoplasmic localization and protein levels, both of which are regulated by phosphorylation (4,5). CLOCK/BMAL1 target genes include the Cry and Per genes, whose proteins form the negative limb of the circadian clockwork system (1,2). CRY and PER proteins (CRY1, CRY2, PER1, PER2 and PER3) form oligomers that also periodically shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. When in the nucleus, CRY/PER proteins inhibit CLOCK/BMAL1-mediated transcriptional activation, thus completing the circadian transcriptional loop (1,2). In tissues, roughly six to eight percent of all genes exhibit a circadian expression pattern (1,2). This 24-hour periodicity in gene expression results from coordination of the positive and negative regulatory limbs of the cellular clockwork system, and is fine-tuned by outside signals received from the SCN.

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Western Blotting

Background: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily members are critical regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation, developmental patterning and morphogenesis, and disease pathogenesis (1-4). TGF-β elicits signaling through three cell surface receptors: type I (RI), type II (RII), and type III (RIII). Type I and type II receptors are serine/threonine kinases that form a heteromeric complex. In response to ligand binding, the type II receptors form a stable complex with the type I receptors allowing phosphorylation and activation of type I receptor kinases (5). The type III receptor, also known as betaglycan, is a transmembrane proteoglycan with a large extracellular domain that binds TGF-β with high affinity but lacks a cytoplasmic signaling domain (6,7). Expression of the type III receptor can regulate TGF-β signaling through presentation of the ligand to the signaling complex. The only known direct TGF-β signaling effectors are the Smad family proteins, which transduce signals from the cell surface directly to the nucleus to regulate target gene transcription (8,9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) tumor suppressor gene is mutated in most familial and sporadic colorectal cancers and encodes a large cytoplasmic protein that is implicated in cell migration, cell adhesion, and proliferation (1). APC binds directly to microtubules and lack of APC leads to defective mitotic spindles and aneuploidy due to missegregation of chromosomes (2). APC is well characterized as a scaffolding protein, binds to β-catenin, and is involved in the regulation of its intracellular concentration. In the absence of a Wnt signal, GSK-3β phosphorylates all three members of the APC-β-catenin-axin complex and this phosphorylation of β-catenin creates a recognition site for ubiquitin, the signal for proteasome-mediated degradation. In the presence of a Wnt signal, dishevelled inactivates GSK-3β and β-catenin coordinates gene transcription of proteins important for the control of cell cycle progression and proliferation, such as cyclin D1 and c-Myc (3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Dicer is a member of the RNase III family that specifically cleaves double-stranded RNAs to generate microRNAs (miRNAs) (1). After long primary transcript pri-miRNAs are processed to stem-looped pre-miRNAs by Drosha (2), pre-miRNAs are transported to the cytoplasm and further processed by Dicer to produce 22-nucleotide mature miRNAs (3). The mature miRNA then becomes a part of the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) and can bind to the 3' UTR of the target mRNA (3).