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Polyclonal Antibody Immunofluorescence Immunocytochemistry Actin Dynamics

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Cortactin is a cortical actin binding protein. Its amino-terminal acidic domain (NTA) associates with the Arp2/3 and WASP complex at F-actin branches. The central region of the protein contains six repeats of 37 amino acids that are important in F-actin binding and cross-linking. The carboxy-terminus contains a proline-rich region and an SH3 domain that can interact with numerous scaffolding proteins, such as CortBP1 and Shank3 (1,2). Cortactin is involved in signaling events that coordinate actin reorganization during cell movement. The human cortactin homologue EMS1 is overexpressed in numerous cancers with poor patient prognosis (3). Cortactin may also play an important role in the organization of transmembrane receptors at postsynaptic densities (PSD) and tight junctions by linking scaffolding proteins to the actin network (4).Cortactin is phosphorylated at tyrosine residues 421, 466, and 482. Tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin regulates cell motility (5), rac1-mediated actin dynamics (6), cadherin-dependent adhesion (7), chemokine trafficking and chemokine-dependent chemotaxis (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The dynamic polymerization and depolymerization of actin filaments, a process governed by external and internal signaling events, is vital for cell motility (immune cell function, migration, invasion, metastasis, angiogenesis), cell division and adhesion. Among the many regulators of actin dynamics are profilins. Profilins are conserved actin binding proteins that affect the rate of actin polymerization by binding actin monomers and promoting the exchange of ADP for ATP (reviewed in 1). Profilins bind to proteins involved in the regulation of actin dynamics including palladin (2), dynamin-1 (3), VASP (4) and N-WASP (5). In mice, knockout of the ubiquitously expressed profilin-1 indicates that the protein is essential for embryonic development (6). Profilin-2 is primarily expressed in brain and functions in the regulation of neurite outgrowth (7), membrane trafficking and endocytosis (3). The recently cloned profilin-3 is expressed in kidney and testes (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, which includes Src, Lyn, Fyn, Yes, Lck, Blk, and Hck, are important in the regulation of growth and differentiation of eukaryotic cells (1). Src activity is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation at two sites, but with opposing effects. While phosphorylation at Tyr416 in the activation loop of the kinase domain upregulates enzyme activity, phosphorylation at Tyr527 in the carboxy-terminal tail by Csk renders the enzyme less active (2).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is one of the earliest events in a cascade that controls a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, gene expression, proliferation, and muscle contraction (1,2). PKC isoforms belong to three groups based on calcium dependency and activators. Classical PKCs are calcium-dependent via their C2 domains and are activated by phosphatidylserine (PS), diacylglycerol (DAG), and phorbol esters (TPA, PMA) through their cysteine-rich C1 domains. Both novel and atypical PKCs are calcium-independent, but only novel PKCs are activated by PS, DAG, and phorbol esters (3-5). Members of these three PKC groups contain a pseudo-substrate or autoinhibitory domain that binds to substrate-binding sites in the catalytic domain to prevent activation in the absence of cofactors or activators. Control of PKC activity is regulated through three distinct phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation occurs in vivo at Thr500 in the activation loop, at Thr641 through autophosphorylation, and at the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic site Ser660 (2). Atypical PKC isoforms lack hydrophobic region phosphorylation, which correlates with the presence of glutamic acid rather than the serine or threonine residues found in more typical PKC isoforms. The enzyme PDK1 or a close relative is responsible for PKC activation. A recent addition to the PKC superfamily is PKCμ (PKD), which is regulated by DAG and TPA through its C1 domain. PKD is distinguished by the presence of a PH domain and by its unique substrate recognition and Golgi localization (6). PKC-related kinases (PRK) lack the C1 domain and do not respond to DAG or phorbol esters. Phosphatidylinositol lipids activate PRKs, and small Rho-family GTPases bind to the homology region 1 (HR1) to regulate PRK kinase activity (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) activates cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA or cAPK) in mammalian cells and controls many cellular mechanisms such as gene transcription, ion transport, and protein phosphorylation (1). Inactive PKA is a heterotetramer composed of a regulatory subunit (R) dimer and a catalytic subunit (C) dimer. In this inactive state, the pseudosubstrate sequences on the R subunits block the active sites on the C subunits. Three C subunit isoforms (C-α, C-β, and C-γ) and two families of regulatory subunits (RI and RII) with distinct cAMP binding properties have been identified. The two R families exist in two isoforms, α and β (RI-α, RI-β, RII-α, and RII-β). Upon binding of cAMP to the R subunits, the autoinhibitory contact is eased and active monomeric C subunits are released. PKA shares substrate specificity with Akt (PKB) and PKC, which are characterized by an arginine at position -3 relative to the phosphorylated serine or threonine residue (2). Substrates that present this consensus sequence and have been shown to be phosphorylated by PKA are Bad (Ser155), CREB (Ser133), and GSK-3 (GSK-3α Ser21 and GSK-3β Ser9) (3-5). In addition, combined knock-down of PKA C-α and -β blocks cAMP-mediated phosphorylation of Raf (Ser43 and Ser259) (6). Autophosphorylation and phosphorylation by PDK-1 are two known mechanisms responsible for phosphorylation of the C subunit at Thr197 (7).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Myosin is composed of six polypeptide chains: two identical heavy chains and two pairs of light chains. Myosin light chain 2 (MLC2), also known as myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC), RLC, or LC20, has many isoforms depending on its distribution. In smooth muscle, MLC2 is phosphorylated at Thr18 and Ser19 by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner (1). This phosphorylation is correlated with myosin ATPase activity and smooth muscle contraction (2). ROCK also phosphorylates Ser19 of smooth muscle MLC2, which regulates the assembly of stress fibers (3). Phosphorylation of smooth muscle MLC2 at Ser1/Ser2 and Ser9 by PKC and cdc2 has been reported to inhibit myosin ATPase activity (4,5). Phosphorylation by cdc2 controls the timing of cytokinesis (5). Transgenic mice lacking phosphorylation sites on the cardiac muscle isoform show morphological and functional abnormalities (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Integrins are α/β heterodimeric cell surface receptors that play a pivotal role in cell adhesion and migration, as well as in growth and survival (1,2). The integrin family contains at least 18 α and 8 β subunits that form 24 known integrins having distinct tissue distribution and overlapping ligand specificities (3). Integrins not only transmit signals to cells in response to the extracellular environment (outside-in signaling), but also sense intracellular cues to alter their interaction with extracellular environment (inside-out signaling) (1,2).The αVβ5 integrin is expressed in various tissues and cell types, including endothelia, epithelia and fibroblasts (4). It plays a role in matrix adhesion to VN, FN, SPARC and bone sialoprotein (5) and functions in the invasion of gliomas and metastatic carcinoma cells (6,7). αVβ5 integrin plays a major role in growth-factor-induced tumor angiogenesis, where cooperative signaling by the αVβ5 integrin and growth factors regulates endothelial cell proliferation and survival (8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) activates cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA or cAPK) in mammalian cells and controls many cellular mechanisms such as gene transcription, ion transport, and protein phosphorylation (1). Inactive PKA is a heterotetramer composed of a regulatory subunit (R) dimer and a catalytic subunit (C) dimer. In this inactive state, the pseudosubstrate sequences on the R subunits block the active sites on the C subunits. Three C subunit isoforms (C-α, C-β, and C-γ) and two families of regulatory subunits (RI and RII) with distinct cAMP binding properties have been identified. The two R families exist in two isoforms, α and β (RI-α, RI-β, RII-α, and RII-β). Upon binding of cAMP to the R subunits, the autoinhibitory contact is eased and active monomeric C subunits are released. PKA shares substrate specificity with Akt (PKB) and PKC, which are characterized by an arginine at position -3 relative to the phosphorylated serine or threonine residue (2). Substrates that present this consensus sequence and have been shown to be phosphorylated by PKA are Bad (Ser155), CREB (Ser133), and GSK-3 (GSK-3α Ser21 and GSK-3β Ser9) (3-5). In addition, combined knock-down of PKA C-α and -β blocks cAMP-mediated phosphorylation of Raf (Ser43 and Ser259) (6). Autophosphorylation and phosphorylation by PDK-1 are two known mechanisms responsible for phosphorylation of the C subunit at Thr197 (7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Calcineurin, also known as protein phosphatase 2B (PP2B), is a calmodulin-dependent, calcium-activated, serine/threonine protein phosphatase composed of a catalytic subunit (calcineurin A) and a tightly bound regulatory subunit (calcineurin B) (1). Calcineurin A is highly homologous to protein phosphatases 1 and 2A. Calcineurin B, like calmodulin, contains four EF-hand, calcium-binding motifs.Calcineurin signaling has been implicated in a broad spectrum of cellular processes including cell-cycle regulation, stress response and apoptosis and is required for proper cardiovascular and skeletal muscle development (2,3). Calcineurin-mediated dephosphorylation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factor is essential for NFAT activation and nuclear translocation and early gene expression in T lymphocytes (2,3). Calcineurin is the target of the immunosuppressive drugs Cyclosporin A and FK506, both of which block the activation of quiescent T cells after T cell receptor engagement (2,3). Cyclosporin A and FK506 bind to the immunophilins, cyclophilin and FKBP respectively and the immunophilin-drug complex binds to calcineurin and blocks substrate binding.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: MEK1 and MEK2, also called MAPK or Erk kinases, are dual-specificity protein kinases that function in a mitogen activated protein kinase cascade controlling cell growth and differentiation (1-3). Activation of MEK1 and MEK2 occurs through phosphorylation of two serine residues at positions 217 and 221, located in the activation loop of subdomain VIII, by Raf-like molecules. MEK1/2 is activated by a wide variety of growth factors and cytokines and also by membrane depolarization and calcium influx (1-4). Constitutively active forms of MEK1/2 are sufficient for the transformation of NIH/3T3 cells or the differentiation of PC-12 cells (4). MEK activates p44 and p42 MAP kinase by phosphorylating both threonine and tyrosine residues at sites located within the activation loop of kinase subdomain VIII.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Pig, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Paxillin is a multidomain protein that localizes primarily to focal adhesion sites in the extracellular matrix (1). Paxillin is one of the key components of integrin signaling, and tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin is required for integrin-mediated cytoskeletal reorganization (2). Paxillin is phosphorylated by another focal adhesion component, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), at Tyr118 (3,4). Phospho-Paxillin (Tyr118) may provide a docking site for recruitment of other signaling molecules to focal adhesions. It has been shown that the SH2 domain of Crk binds to the phosphorylated Tyr118 of paxillin (5).