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Polyclonal Antibody Immunofluorescence Immunocytochemistry Cell Division

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Ribosomal protein S3 (rpS3) is a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit and is involved in translation. HSP90 interacts with both the amino-terminus and carboxy-terminus of rpS3, preventing its ubiquitination and degradation and thereby retaining the integrity of the ribosome (1). rpS3 has also been shown to function as an endonuclease during DNA damage repair (2,3). Furthermore, overexpression of rpS3 sensitizes lymphocytic cells to cytokine-induced apoptosis, indicating a third role for rpS3 during apoptosis (4). The functions of rpS3 during DNA damage repair and apoptosis have been mapped to two distinct domains (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). In addition to p53, mammalian cells contain two p53 family members, p63 and p73, which are similar to p53 in both structure and function (2). While p63 can induce p53-responsive genes and apoptosis, mutation of p63 rarely results in tumors (2). Research investigators frequently observe amplification of the p63 gene in squamous cell carcinomas of the lung, head and neck (2,3). The p63 gene contains an alternative transcription initiation site that yields a truncated ΔNp63 lacking the transactivation domain, and alternative splicing at the carboxy-terminus yields the α, β, and γ isoforms (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB1) belongs to a family of evolutionarily conserved, multifunctional Y-box proteins that bind single-stranded DNA and RNA and function as regulators of transcription, RNA metabolism, and protein synthesis (1). YB1 binds to Y-box sequences (TAACC) found in multiple gene promoters and can positively or negatively regulate transcription. YB1 activates genes associated with proliferation and cancer, such as cyclin A, cyclin B1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), and the multi-drug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene (2-4). YB1 represses genes associated with cell death, including the Fas cell death-associated receptor and the p53 tumor suppressor gene (5-7). It also interacts with the RNA-splicing factor SRp30c and stabilizes interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA upon induction of T lymphocytes by IL-2 (8,9). The majority of YB1 protein localizes to the cytoplasm, with a minor pool found in the nucleus; however, nuclear localization appears to be critical for its role in promoting proliferation. Nuclear translocation is cell cycle regulated, with YB1 protein accumulating in the nucleus during G1/S phase (2). In addition, nuclear translocation is induced in response to extracellular stimuli such as hyperthermia and UV irradiation, or treatment of cells with thrombin, interferons, or insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) (2,10). Treatment of the MCF7 breast cancer cell line with IGF-I results in Akt-mediated phosphorylation of YB1 at Ser102, which is required for nuclear translocation of YB1 and its ability to promote anchorage-independent growth (10). Research studies have shown that YB1 is overexpressed in many malignant tissues, including breast cancer, non-small cell lung carcinoma, ovarian adenocarcinomas, human osteosarcomas, colorectal carcinomas, and malignant melanomas. Investigators have shown that nuclear YB1 expression correlates with high levels of proliferation, drug resistance, and poor tumor prognosis (2,7,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: TIAR is a member of the RNA-recognition motif (RRM) family of RNA-binding proteins (1,2). It functions as a translational repressor under conditions of cellular damage (3,4). In response to cellular stress, TIAR associates with eIF1, eIF3, and the 40S ribosomal subunit and forms noncanonical preinitiation complexes that are translationally inactive (3,4). TIAR then aggregates with its family member TIA1 and facilitates the accumulation of the translationally inactive preinitiation complexes into discrete cytoplasmic foci called stress granules. The two major isoforms of TIAR are the products of alternative mRNA splicing (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The Ras family small GTPase Ran is involved in nuclear envelope formation, assembly of the mitotic spindle, and nuclear transport (1,2). Like other small GTPases, Ran is active in its GTP-bound form and inactive in its GDP-bound form. Nuclear RanGTP concentration is maintained through nuclear localization of guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity, which catalyzes the exchange of bound GDP for GTP. Regulator of chromatin condensation 1 (RCC1) is the only known RanGEF (3). RCC1 is dynamically chromatin-bound throughout the cell cycle, and this localization is required for mitosis to proceed normally (4,5). Appropriate association of RCC1 with chromatin is regulated through amino-terminal phosphorylation (5,6) and methylation (7). RCC1 regulation of RanGTP levels in response to histone modifications regulates nuclear import during apoptosis (8). In mitosis RCC1 is phosphorylated at Ser11, possibly by cyclin B/cdc2 (9-11). This phosphorylation may play a role in RCC1 interaction with chromatin and RCC1 RanGEF activity (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Chromatin IP, Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Oct-4 (POU5F1) is a transcription factor highly expressed in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells and embryonic germ cells (1). A network of key factors that includes Oct-4, Nanog, and Sox2 is necessary for the maintenance of pluripotent potential, and downregulation of Oct-4 has been shown to trigger cell differentiation (2,3). Research studies have demonstrated that Oct-4 is a useful germ cell tumor marker (4). Oct-4 exists as two splice variants, Oct-4A and Oct-4B (5). Recent studies have suggested that the Oct-4A isoform has the ability to confer and sustain pluripotency, while Oct-4B may exist in some somatic, non-pluripotent cells (6,7).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: RCC2/TD-60 is a member of the RCC1 (regulator of chromosome condensation 1) family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors. RCC2/TD-60 is associated with the chromosome passenger complex (CPC), which also consists of aurora B kinase, borealin, INCENP (inner centromere protein) and survivin. The CPC acts at various stages of mitosis, interacts with microtubules and is required for proper chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. Regulation of aurora B kinase is key in the regulation of the CPC (reviewed in 1,2). In late mitosis, RCC2/TD-60 is required for spindle assembly and recruitment of survivin and aurora B (3). RCC2/TD-60 is also required for aurora B activation in vitro and localization of the CPC to centromeres (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) is a coiled coil protein involved in the formation and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. NuMA plays a role in chromatin organization during interphase, which influences mammary epithelial differentiation (1,2). During apoptosis, carboxy-terminal cleavage of NuMA may amplify signaling in the cell death pathway (2). NuMA is phosphorylated at numerous sites, with phosphorylation at Ser395 occurring in an ATM/ATR-dependent manner in response to DNA damage (3,4).Phosphorylation at Thr2055 by CDK1 is required for spindle pole association of NuMA at the onset of mitosis. Dephosphorylation by PPP2CA leads to enhancement of NuMA at the cell cortex in anaphase and proper cell-cycle progression (5,6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Structural maintenance of chromosomes 1 (SMC1) protein is a chromosomal protein member of the cohesin complex that enables sister chromatid cohesion and plays a role in DNA repair (1,2). ATM/NBS1-dependent phosphorylation of SMC1 occurs at Ser957 and Ser966 in response to ionizing radiation (IR) as part of the intra-S-phase DNA damage checkpoint (3). SMC1 phosphorylation is ATM-independent in cells subjected to other forms of DNA damage, including UV light and hydroxyurea treatment (4). While phosphorylation of SMC1 is required for activation of the IR-induced intra-S-phase checkpoint, the precise mechanism is not well understood and may involve a conformational change that affects SMC1-SMC3 interaction (3).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The cohesin complex consists of a heterodimer between SMC1 (SMC1A or B) and SMC3, bound by additional RAD21 and STAG proteins (STAG1, 2, or 3) (1,2). These proteins form a ring-like structure that mediates the cohesion of two sister chromatids after DNA replication in S phase (1,2). RAD21 and STAG2 are phosphorylated by Polo-like kinase (PLK) during prophase, which leads to the dissociation of cohesin complexes from the chromosome arms; however, cohesin remains bound to centromeres until anaphase (3,4). RAD21 is cleaved by separin/ESPL1 in anaphase, which leads to dissociation of the remaining cohesin from centromeres, enabling sister chromatids to segregate during mitosis (5). RAD21 is also cleaved by caspase-3 and caspase-7 during apoptosis, resulting in a 64 kDa carboxy-terminal cleavage product that translocates to the cytoplasm and may help to trigger apoptosis (6,7). In addition to mediating cohesion of sister chromatids, the cohesin complex plays important roles in gene regulation and DNA repair, as SMC1 and SMC3 are both phosphorylated by ATM and ATR kinases upon DNA damage (1,2).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
$717
300 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Chk2 is the mammalian orthologue of the budding yeast Rad53 and fission yeast Cds1 checkpoint kinases (1-3). The amino-terminal domain of Chk2 contains a series of seven serine or threonine residues (Ser19, Thr26, Ser28, Ser33, Ser35, Ser50, and Thr68) each followed by glutamine (SQ or TQ motif). These are known to be preferred sites for phosphorylation by ATM/ATR kinases (4,5). After DNA damage by ionizing radiation (IR), UV irradiation, or hydroxyurea treatment, Thr68 and other sites in this region become phosphorylated by ATM/ATR (5-7). The SQ/TQ cluster domain, therefore, seems to have a regulatory function. Phosphorylation at Thr68 is a prerequisite for the subsequent activation step, which is attributable to autophosphorylation of Chk2 at residues Thr383 and Thr387 in the activation loop of the kinase domain (8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Cyclins are a family of proteins that activate specific cyclin-dependent kinases required for progression through the cell cycle. The entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by activation of cdc2/cdk1 at the G2/M transition. This activation is a multi-step process that begins with the binding of the regulatory subunit, cyclin B1, to cdc2/cdk1 to form the mitosis-promoting factor (MPF). MPF remains in the inactive state until phosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr161 by cdk activating kinase (CAK) (1,2) and dephosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr14/Tyr15 by cdc25C (3-5). Five cyclin B1 phosphorylation sites (Ser116, 126, 128, 133, and 147) are located in the cytoplasmic retention signal (CRS) domain and are thought to regulate the translocation of cyclin B1 to the nucleus at the G2/M checkpoint, promoting nuclear accumulation and initiation of mitosis (6-9). While MPF itself can phosphorylate Ser126 and Ser128, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) phosphorylates cyclin B1 preferentially at Ser133 and possibly at Ser147 (6,10). At the end of mitosis, cyclin B1 is targeted for degradation by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), allowing for cell cycle progression (11). Research studies have shown that cyclin B1 is overexpressed in breast, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers (12-14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: CD2AP is a scaffolding protein that is thought to link membrane proteins to the cytoskeleton (1-3). It plays a role in formation of tight junctions in specialized cell types such as the slit diaphragm in the kidney glomerulus (4). CD2AP is also involved in the immunological synapse between CD2 expressing T cells and antigen presenting cells (5). It has been shown that interaction between CD2AP and other cytoskeletal proteins may regulate the endocytosis of EGFR (3).