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Polyclonal Antibody Immunofluorescence Immunocytochemistry Dna Replication Initiation

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) 2-7 proteins are a family of six related proteins required for initiation and elongation of DNA replication. MCM2-7 bind together to form the heterohexameric MCM complex that is thought to act as a replicative helicase at the DNA replication fork (1-5). This complex is a key component of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC) (reviewed in 1). Cdc6 and CDT1 recruit the MCM complex to the origin recognition complex (ORC) during late mitosis/early G1 phase forming the pre-RC and licensing the DNA for replication (reviewed in 2). Licensing of the chromatin permits the DNA to replicate only once per cell cycle, thereby helping to ensure that genetic alterations and malignant cell growth do not occur (reviewed in 3). Phosphorylation of the MCM2, MCM3, MCM4, and MCM6 subunits appears to regulate MCM complex activity and the initiation of DNA synthesis (6-8). CDK1 phosphorylation of MCM3 at Ser112 during late mitosis/early G1 phase has been shown to initiate complex formation and chromatin loading in vitro (8). Phosphorylation of MCM2 at serine 139 by cdc7/dbf4 coincides with the initiation of DNA replication (9). MCM proteins are removed during DNA replication, causing chromatin to become unlicensed through inhibition of pre-RC reformation. Studies have shown that the MCM complex is involved in checkpoint control by protecting the structure of the replication fork and assisting in restarting replication by recruiting checkpoint proteins after arrest (reviewed in 3,10).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) 2-7 proteins are a family of six related proteins required for initiation and elongation of DNA replication. MCM2-7 bind together to form the heterohexameric MCM complex that is thought to act as a replicative helicase at the DNA replication fork (1-5). This complex is a key component of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC) (reviewed in 1). Cdc6 and CDT1 recruit the MCM complex to the origin recognition complex (ORC) during late mitosis/early G1 phase forming the pre-RC and licensing the DNA for replication (reviewed in 2). Licensing of the chromatin permits the DNA to replicate only once per cell cycle, thereby helping to ensure that genetic alterations and malignant cell growth do not occur (reviewed in 3). Phosphorylation of the MCM2, MCM3, MCM4, and MCM6 subunits appears to regulate MCM complex activity and the initiation of DNA synthesis (6-8). CDK1 phosphorylation of MCM3 at Ser112 during late mitosis/early G1 phase has been shown to initiate complex formation and chromatin loading in vitro (8). Phosphorylation of MCM2 at serine 139 by cdc7/dbf4 coincides with the initiation of DNA replication (9). MCM proteins are removed during DNA replication, causing chromatin to become unlicensed through inhibition of pre-RC reformation. Studies have shown that the MCM complex is involved in checkpoint control by protecting the structure of the replication fork and assisting in restarting replication by recruiting checkpoint proteins after arrest (reviewed in 3,10).

$122
20 µl
$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). In addition to p53, mammalian cells contain two p53 family members, p63 and p73, which are similar to p53 in both structure and function (2). While p63 can induce p53-responsive genes and apoptosis, mutation of p63 rarely results in tumors (2). Research investigators frequently observe amplification of the p63 gene in squamous cell carcinomas of the lung, head and neck (2,3). The p63 gene contains an alternative transcription initiation site that yields a truncated ΔNp63 lacking the transactivation domain, and alternative splicing at the carboxy-terminus yields the α, β, and γ isoforms (3,4).