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Polyclonal Antibody Immunofluorescence Immunocytochemistry Mitotic Cell Cycle

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 20S proteasome is the major proteolytic enzyme complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. PA700, PA28, and PA200 are three major protein complexes that function as activators of the 20S proteasome. There are three evolutionarily conserved subunits of PA28: PA28α (PSME1), PA28β (PSME2), and PA28γ (PSME3) (1,2). PA28α and PA28β form a heteroheptameric complex and function by binding to the 20S complex at its opening site(s). The PA28α/β complex is present throughout the cell and participates in MHC class I antigen presentation by promoting the generation of antigenic peptides from foreign proteins (2). PA28γ exists in the form of a homoheptamer and is mainly located in the nucleus. The PA28γ complex exerts its function by binding and guiding specific nuclear target proteins to the 20S proteasome for further degradation (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The 20S proteasome is the major proteolytic enzyme complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. It consists of four stacked rings, each with seven distinct subunits. The two outer layers are identical rings composed of α subunits (called PSMAs), and the two inner layers are identical rings composed of β subunits. While the catalytic sites are located on the β rings (1-3), the α subunits are important for assembly and as binding sites for regulatory proteins (4). Seven different α and ten different β proteasome genes have been identified in mammals (5). PA700, PA28, and PA200 are three major protein complexes that function as activators of the 20S proteasome. PA700 binds polyubiquitin with high affinity and associates with the 20S proteasome to form the 26S proteasome, which preferentially degrades poly-ubiquitinated proteins (1-3). The proteasome has a broad substrate spectrum that includes cell cycle regulators, signaling molecules, tumor suppressors, and transcription factors. By controlling the degradation of these intracellular proteins, the proteasome functions in cell cycle regulation, cancer development, immune responses, protein folding, and disease progression (6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The 20S proteasome is the major proteolytic enzyme complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. It consists of four stacked rings, each with seven distinct subunits. The two outer layers are identical rings composed of α subunits (called PSMAs), and the two inner layers are identical rings composed of β subunits. While the catalytic sites are located on the β rings (1-3), the α subunits are important for assembly and as binding sites for regulatory proteins (4). Seven different α and ten different β proteasome genes have been identified in mammals (5). PA700, PA28, and PA200 are three major protein complexes that function as activators of the 20S proteasome. PA700 binds polyubiquitin with high affinity and associates with the 20S proteasome to form the 26S proteasome, which preferentially degrades poly-ubiquitinated proteins (1-3). The proteasome has a broad substrate spectrum that includes cell cycle regulators, signaling molecules, tumor suppressors, and transcription factors. By controlling the degradation of these intracellular proteins, the proteasome functions in cell cycle regulation, cancer development, immune responses, protein folding, and disease progression (6-9).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) is a coiled coil protein involved in the formation and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. NuMA plays a role in chromatin organization during interphase, which influences mammary epithelial differentiation (1,2). During apoptosis, carboxy-terminal cleavage of NuMA may amplify signaling in the cell death pathway (2). NuMA is phosphorylated at numerous sites, with phosphorylation at Ser395 occurring in an ATM/ATR-dependent manner in response to DNA damage (3,4).Phosphorylation at Thr2055 by CDK1 is required for spindle pole association of NuMA at the onset of mitosis. Dephosphorylation by PPP2CA leads to enhancement of NuMA at the cell cortex in anaphase and proper cell-cycle progression (5,6).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Structural maintenance of chromosomes 1 (SMC1) protein is a chromosomal protein member of the cohesin complex that enables sister chromatid cohesion and plays a role in DNA repair (1,2). ATM/NBS1-dependent phosphorylation of SMC1 occurs at Ser957 and Ser966 in response to ionizing radiation (IR) as part of the intra-S-phase DNA damage checkpoint (3). SMC1 phosphorylation is ATM-independent in cells subjected to other forms of DNA damage, including UV light and hydroxyurea treatment (4). While phosphorylation of SMC1 is required for activation of the IR-induced intra-S-phase checkpoint, the precise mechanism is not well understood and may involve a conformational change that affects SMC1-SMC3 interaction (3).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Cyclins are a family of proteins that activate specific cyclin-dependent kinases required for progression through the cell cycle. The entry of all eukaryotic cells into mitosis is regulated by activation of cdc2/cdk1 at the G2/M transition. This activation is a multi-step process that begins with the binding of the regulatory subunit, cyclin B1, to cdc2/cdk1 to form the mitosis-promoting factor (MPF). MPF remains in the inactive state until phosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr161 by cdk activating kinase (CAK) (1,2) and dephosphorylation of cdc2/cdk1 at Thr14/Tyr15 by cdc25C (3-5). Five cyclin B1 phosphorylation sites (Ser116, 126, 128, 133, and 147) are located in the cytoplasmic retention signal (CRS) domain and are thought to regulate the translocation of cyclin B1 to the nucleus at the G2/M checkpoint, promoting nuclear accumulation and initiation of mitosis (6-9). While MPF itself can phosphorylate Ser126 and Ser128, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) phosphorylates cyclin B1 preferentially at Ser133 and possibly at Ser147 (6,10). At the end of mitosis, cyclin B1 is targeted for degradation by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), allowing for cell cycle progression (11). Research studies have shown that cyclin B1 is overexpressed in breast, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers (12-14).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) is an essential protein serine/threonine phosphatase that is conserved in all eukaryotes. PP2A is a key enzyme within various signal transduction pathways as it regulates fundamental cellular activities such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, metabolism, cell cycle progression, cell division, apoptosis and development (1-3). The core enzyme consists of catalytic C and regulatory A (or PR65) subunits, with each subunit represented by α and β isoforms (1). Additional regulatory subunits belong to four different families of unrelated proteins. Both the B (or PR55) and B' regulatory protein families contain α, β, γ and δ isoforms, with the B' family also including an ε protein. B'' family proteins include PR72, PR130, PR59 and PR48 isoforms, while striatin (PR110) and SG2NA (PR93) are both members of the B''' regulatory protein family. These B subunits competitively bind to a shared binding site on the core A subunit (1). This variable array of holoenzyme components, particularly regulatory B subunits, allows PP2A to act in a diverse set of functions. PP2A function is regulated by expression, localization, holoenzyme composition and post-translational modification. Phosphorylation of PP2A at Tyr307 by Src occurs in response to EGF or insulin and results in a substantial reduction of PP2A activity (4). Reversible methylation on the carboxyl group of Leu309 of PP2A has been observed (5,6). Methylation alters the conformation of PP2A, as well as its localization and association with B regulatory subunits (6-8).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Ubiquitin can be covalently linked to many cellular proteins by the ubiquitination process, which targets proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome. Three components are involved in the target protein-ubiquitin conjugation process. Ubiquitin is first activated by forming a thiolester complex with the activation component E1; the activated ubiquitin is subsequently transferred to the ubiquitin-carrier protein E2 and then from E2 to ubiquitin ligase E3 for final delivery to the epsilon-NH2 of the target protein lysine residue (1-3). Combinatorial interactions of different E2 and E3 proteins result in substrate specificity (4). Recent data suggests that activated E2 associates transiently with E3, and the dissociation is a critical step for ubiquitination (5). S phase kinase-associated protein 1 (Skp1) is a critical scaffold protein of the Skp1/CUL1/F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase protein complex. Various F-box proteins (e.g., β-TrCP, Skp2) mediate an interaction with Skp1, via their defining and conserved domain of 40 amino acids, and with substrates to be ubiquitinated (e.g., β-catenin, p27) (4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The 20S proteasome is the major proteolytic enzyme complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. PA700, PA28, and PA200 are three major protein complexes that function as activators of the 20S proteasome. There are three evolutionarily conserved subunits of PA28: PA28α (PSME1), PA28β (PSME2), and PA28γ (PSME3) (1,2). PA28α and PA28β form a heteroheptameric complex and function by binding to the 20S complex at its opening site(s). The PA28α/β complex is present throughout the cell and participates in MHC class I antigen presentation by promoting the generation of antigenic peptides from foreign proteins (2). PA28γ exists in the form of a homoheptamer and is mainly located in the nucleus. The PA28γ complex exerts its function by binding and guiding specific nuclear target proteins to the 20S proteasome for further degradation (3,4).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Members of the F-box family of proteins are characterized by the approximate 40 amino acid F-box motif named after cyclin F (1,2). F-box proteins constitute one of the four subunits of the Skp1-Cullin-F-box (SCF) ubiquitin ligase complex. The substrate specificity of SCF complexes is determined by the interchangeable F-box proteins, which act as adaptors by associating with phosphorylated substrate proteins and recruiting them to the SCF core. F-box proteins contain two fundamental domains: the F-box motif mediates binding to Skp1 and a leucine rich repeat (LRR) domain mediates substrate interactions.

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: Lamins are nuclear membrane structural components that are important in maintaining normal cell functions such as cell cycle control, DNA replication, and chromatin organization (1-3). Lamin A/C is cleaved by caspase-6 and serves as a marker for caspase-6 activation. During apoptosis, lamin A/C is specifically cleaved into a large (41-50 kDa) and a small (28 kDa) fragment (3,4). The cleavage of lamins results in nuclear dysregulation and cell death (5,6).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) is an essential protein serine/threonine phosphatase that is conserved in all eukaryotes. PP2A is a key enzyme within various signal transduction pathways as it regulates fundamental cellular activities such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, metabolism, cell cycle progression, cell division, apoptosis and development (1-3). The core enzyme consists of catalytic C and regulatory A (or PR65) subunits, with each subunit represented by α and β isoforms (1). Additional regulatory subunits belong to four different families of unrelated proteins. Both the B (or PR55) and B' regulatory protein families contain α, β, γ and δ isoforms, with the B' family also including an ε protein. B'' family proteins include PR72, PR130, PR59 and PR48 isoforms, while striatin (PR110) and SG2NA (PR93) are both members of the B''' regulatory protein family. These B subunits competitively bind to a shared binding site on the core A subunit (1). This variable array of holoenzyme components, particularly regulatory B subunits, allows PP2A to act in a diverse set of functions. PP2A function is regulated by expression, localization, holoenzyme composition and post-translational modification. Phosphorylation of PP2A at Tyr307 by Src occurs in response to EGF or insulin and results in a substantial reduction of PP2A activity (4). Reversible methylation on the carboxyl group of Leu309 of PP2A has been observed (5,6). Methylation alters the conformation of PP2A, as well as its localization and association with B regulatory subunits (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The centrosome is composed of a pair of centrioles surrounded by electron-dense pericentriolar material and functions as the microtubule-organizing center responsible for microtubule nucleation and spindle organization during cell cycle progression (1). Percentriolar material 1 (PCM-1) is a large, 228 kDa protein associated with the centrosome in a cell cycle dependent manner (2). PCM-1 localizes to small cytoplasmic granules called centrosomal satellites (3). PCM-1 is required for the assembly of several centrosomal proteins including centrin, pericentrin, ninein, NEK2, and CEP250 (4-8). Chromosomal translocations involving genes encoding PCM-1 and the tyrosine kinases Ret and Jak2 are associated with some cancers, including papillary thyroid carcinoma and myeloid leukemia (9-11).

$303
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Lamins are nuclear membrane structural components that are important in maintaining normal cell functions such as cell cycle control, DNA replication, and chromatin organization (1-3). Lamin A/C is cleaved by caspase-6 and serves as a marker for caspase-6 activation. During apoptosis, lamin A/C is specifically cleaved into a large (41-50 kDa) and a small (28 kDa) fragment (3,4). The cleavage of lamins results in nuclear dysregulation and cell death (5,6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: RPA70 (HSSB, REPA1, RF-A, RP-A, p70) is a component of a heterotrimeric complex, composed of 70, 32/30 and 14 kDa subunits, collectively known as RPA. RPA is a single stranded DNA binding protein, whose DNA binding activity is believed to reside entirely in the 70 kDa subunit. The complex is required for almost all aspects of cellular DNA metabolism such as DNA replication (1-3), recombination, cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints, and all major types of DNA repair including nucleotide excision, base excision, mismatch and double-strand break repairs (4-7). In response to genotoxic stress in eukaryotic cells, RPA has been shown to associate with the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1) checkpoint complex (8). RPA is hyperphosphorylated upon DNA damage or replication stress by checkpoint kinases including ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) (9-11). Phosphorylation of RPA32 occurs at serines 4, 8 and 33 (11). Hyperphosphorylation may alter RPA-DNA and RPA-protein interactions. In addition to the checkpoint partners, RPA interacts with a wide variety of protein partners, including proteins required for normal replication such as RCF, PCNA and Pol α, and also proteins involved in SV40 replication, such as DNA polymerase I and SV40 large T antigen (10,12).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: The Ras family small GTPase Ran is involved in nuclear envelope formation, assembly of the mitotic spindle, and nuclear transport (1,2). Like other small GTPases, Ran is active in its GTP-bound form and inactive in its GDP-bound form. Nuclear RanGTP concentration is maintained through nuclear localization of guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity, which catalyzes the exchange of bound GDP for GTP. Regulator of chromatin condensation 1 (RCC1) is the only known RanGEF (3). RCC1 is dynamically chromatin-bound throughout the cell cycle, and this localization is required for mitosis to proceed normally (4,5). Appropriate association of RCC1 with chromatin is regulated through amino-terminal phosphorylation (5,6) and methylation (7). RCC1 regulation of RanGTP levels in response to histone modifications regulates nuclear import during apoptosis (8). In mitosis RCC1 is phosphorylated at Ser11, possibly by cyclin B/cdc2 (9-11). This phosphorylation may play a role in RCC1 interaction with chromatin and RCC1 RanGEF activity (6).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Hamster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) 2-7 proteins are a family of six related proteins required for initiation and elongation of DNA replication. MCM2-7 bind together to form the heterohexameric MCM complex that is thought to act as a replicative helicase at the DNA replication fork (1-5). This complex is a key component of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC) (reviewed in 1). Cdc6 and CDT1 recruit the MCM complex to the origin recognition complex (ORC) during late mitosis/early G1 phase forming the pre-RC and licensing the DNA for replication (reviewed in 2). Licensing of the chromatin permits the DNA to replicate only once per cell cycle, thereby helping to ensure that genetic alterations and malignant cell growth do not occur (reviewed in 3). Phosphorylation of the MCM2, MCM3, MCM4, and MCM6 subunits appears to regulate MCM complex activity and the initiation of DNA synthesis (6-8). CDK1 phosphorylation of MCM3 at Ser112 during late mitosis/early G1 phase has been shown to initiate complex formation and chromatin loading in vitro (8). Phosphorylation of MCM2 at serine 139 by cdc7/dbf4 coincides with the initiation of DNA replication (9). MCM proteins are removed during DNA replication, causing chromatin to become unlicensed through inhibition of pre-RC reformation. Studies have shown that the MCM complex is involved in checkpoint control by protecting the structure of the replication fork and assisting in restarting replication by recruiting checkpoint proteins after arrest (reviewed in 3,10).

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Human, Monkey

Application Methods: Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Western Blotting

Background: Members of the F-box family of proteins are characterized by the approximate 40 amino acid F-box motif named after cyclin F (1,2). F-box proteins constitute one of the four subunits of the Skp1-Cullin-F-box (SCF) ubiquitin ligase complex. The substrate specificity of SCF complexes is determined by the interchangeable F-box proteins, which act as adaptors by associating with phosphorylated substrate proteins and recruiting them to the SCF core. F-box proteins contain two fundamental domains: the F-box motif mediates binding to Skp1 and a leucine rich repeat (LRR) domain mediates substrate interactions.

$111
20 µl
$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
D. melanogaster, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Immunoprecipitation, Western Blotting

Background: Protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) is an essential protein serine/threonine phosphatase that is conserved in all eukaryotes. PP2A is a key enzyme within various signal transduction pathways as it regulates fundamental cellular activities such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, metabolism, cell cycle progression, cell division, apoptosis and development (1-3). The core enzyme consists of catalytic C and regulatory A (or PR65) subunits, with each subunit represented by α and β isoforms (1). Additional regulatory subunits belong to four different families of unrelated proteins. Both the B (or PR55) and B' regulatory protein families contain α, β, γ and δ isoforms, with the B' family also including an ε protein. B'' family proteins include PR72, PR130, PR59 and PR48 isoforms, while striatin (PR110) and SG2NA (PR93) are both members of the B''' regulatory protein family. These B subunits competitively bind to a shared binding site on the core A subunit (1). This variable array of holoenzyme components, particularly regulatory B subunits, allows PP2A to act in a diverse set of functions. PP2A function is regulated by expression, localization, holoenzyme composition and post-translational modification. Phosphorylation of PP2A at Tyr307 by Src occurs in response to EGF or insulin and results in a substantial reduction of PP2A activity (4). Reversible methylation on the carboxyl group of Leu309 of PP2A has been observed (5,6). Methylation alters the conformation of PP2A, as well as its localization and association with B regulatory subunits (6-8).

$260
100 µl
APPLICATIONS
REACTIVITY
Bovine, Human, Monkey, Mouse, Rat, Zebrafish

Application Methods: Flow Cytometry, Immunofluorescence (Immunocytochemistry), Immunohistochemistry (Paraffin), Western Blotting

Background: The cytoskeleton consists of three types of cytosolic fibers: microtubules, microfilaments (actin filaments), and intermediate filaments. Globular tubulin subunits comprise the microtubule building block, with α/β-tubulin heterodimers forming the tubulin subunit common to all eukaryotic cells. γ-tubulin is required to nucleate polymerization of tubulin subunits to form microtubule polymers. Many cell movements are mediated by microtubule action, including the beating of cilia and flagella, cytoplasmic transport of membrane vesicles, chromosome alignment during meiosis/mitosis, and nerve-cell axon migration. These movements result from competitive microtubule polymerization and depolymerization or through the actions of microtubule motor proteins (1).